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I made a change to some code and it got 4.5x faster. I'm wondering why. It used to be essentially:

def doThing(queue: Queue[(String, String)]): Queue[(String, String)] = queue match {
  case Queue((thing, stuff), _*) => doThing(queue.tail)
  case _ => queue
}

and I changed it to this to get a huge speed boost:

def doThing(queue: Queue[(String, String)]): Queue[(String, String)] = queue.headOption match {
  case Some((thing, stuff)) => doThing(queue.tail)
  case _ => queue
}

What does _* do and why is it so expensive compared to headOption?

share|improve this question
    
Is this the mutable Queue or the immutable one? – huynhjl Jul 31 '13 at 4:38
    
@huynhjl, immutable – kelloti Jul 31 '13 at 4:39
2  
What is your compiler version? – senia Jul 31 '13 at 5:08
    
Scala version is 2.10.2 – kelloti Jul 31 '13 at 13:43
up vote 3 down vote accepted

My guess after running scalac with -Xprint:all is that at the end of patmat in the queue match { case Queue((thing, stuff), _*) => doThing(queue.tail) } example I see the following methods being called (edited for brevity):

val o9 = scala.collection.immutable.Queue.unapplySeq[(String, String)](x1);
if (o9.isEmpty.unary_!)
  if (o9.get.!=(null).&&(o9.get.lengthCompare(1).>=(0)))
    {
      val p2: (String, String) = o9.get.apply(0);
      val p3: Seq[(String, String)] = o9.get.drop(1);

So lengthCompare compare the length of the collection in a possibly optimized way. For Queue, it creates an iterator and iterates one time. So that should be somewhat fast. On the other hand drop(1) also constructs an iterator, skips one element and adds the rest of the elements to the result queue, so that would be linear in the size of the collection.

The headOption example is more straightforward, it checks if the list is empty (two comparisons), and if not returns a Some(head), which then just has its _1 and _2 assigned to thing and stuff. So no iterators are created and nothing linear in the length of the collection.

share|improve this answer
    
What is your compiler version? I'm using 2.10.1 and 2.11.0-M3 and there is no p3. – senia Jul 31 '13 at 5:08
    
@senia, 2.10.0. Are you checking the immutable queue? – huynhjl Jul 31 '13 at 5:11
    
@senia, I see what you mean, I do see o9.get.apply(0) with a more recent version and no drop. – huynhjl Jul 31 '13 at 5:15
1  
pastebin. I guess it's an improvement in versions > 2.10.0. – senia Jul 31 '13 at 5:17

There should be no significant difference between your code samples.

case Queue((thing, stuff), _*) is actually translated by compiler to call of head (apply(0)) method. You could use scalac -Xprint:patmat to investigate this:

<synthetic> val p2: (String, String) = o9.get.apply(0);
if (p2.ne(null))
  matchEnd6(doThing(queue.tail))

The cost of head and cost of headOption are almost the same.

Methods head, tail and dequeue could cause reverce on internal List of Queue (with cost O(n)). In both you code samples there will be at most 2 reverce calls. You should use dequeue like this to get at most a single reverce call:

def doThing(queue: Queue[(String, String)]): Queue[(String, String)] =
  if (queue.isEmpty) queue
  else queue.dequeue match {
    case (e, q) => doThing(q)
  }

You could also replace (thing, stuff) with _. In this case compiler will generate only call of lengthCompare without head or tail:

if (o9.get != null && o9.get.lengthCompare(1) >= 0)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I'll try that too. But why the discrepancy in my examples? – kelloti Jul 31 '13 at 4:39
    
@kelloti: are you sure performance is not the same in both examples? Your code could be optimized as useless by jit. As I can see from scalac -Xprint:patmat there is no significant difference between your 2 code samples. – senia Jul 31 '13 at 5:03
    
@senia, I don't think head and tail are O(n). See github.com/scala/scala/blob/v2.10.2/src/library/scala/…. It really leverages structural sharing and it seems O(1) to me. Sorry I take the O(1) back, there is a in.reverse in there. But that is also true of dequeue. – huynhjl Jul 31 '13 at 5:19
    
You are correct, it's O(1). I can see the only option: your benchmark is not correct. – senia Jul 31 '13 at 5:27
    
There will be at most 2 in.reverse in your examples, and 1 with dequeue. It's not a significant performance difference. – senia Jul 31 '13 at 5:30

_* is used to specify varargs arguments, so what you are doing in the first version is deconstructing the Queue into a pair of Strings, and an appropriate number of further pairs of Strings - ie you are deconstructing the whole Queue even though you only care about the first element.

If you just remove the asterisk, giving

def doThing(queue: Queue[(String, String)]): Queue[(String, String)] = queue match {
  case Queue((thing, stuff), _) => doThing(queue.tail)
  case _ => queue
}

then you are only deconstructing the Queue into a pair of Strings, and a remainder (which thus does not need to be fully deconstructed). This should run in comparable time to your second version (haven't timed it myself, though).

share|improve this answer
    
Queue((thing, stuff), _) is a pattern for collection of 2 elements. – senia Jul 31 '13 at 4:12
    
@senia Oops, you're right - I was thinking Queue was constructed like List. Nevertheless, the deconstruction argument around why _* takes so long would still apply (but stick with using headOption or dequeue or similar for the method). – Shadowlands Jul 31 '13 at 4:24
    
Queue is actually constructed using 2 lists. But List(a, b) is also a pattern for list of 2 elements. – senia Jul 31 '13 at 4:27

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