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In my (admittedly limited) experience, most of the functions I've seen for packing/serializing C structures into byte arrays (for transmission over a network or saving to a file) have an API that looks like this:

#include <stddef.h>
#include <stdint.h>

struct foo;
struct bar;

/*!
 * \brief convert a <tt>struct foo</tt> to its network
 * representation
 *
 * \param[out] buf
 *     Where the packed representation of \a foo should be placed.
 *     This must not be NULL unless \a buflen is 0.
 *
 * \param[in] buflen
 *     Length of the buffer at \a buf.  No more than this number
 *     of bytes will be written to \a buf.  If 0, \a buf may be
 *     NULL (this can be useful for determining the length of the
 *     packed representation of \a foo).  If this is less than the
 *     length of the packed representation of \a foo, the packed
 *     representation will be truncated.
 *
 * \param[out] packedlenp
 *     The value at this location will be set to the packed length
 *     of \a foo, which might be greater than \a buflen.  This may
 *     be NULL.
 *
 * \param[in] foo
 *     The location of the structure to pack into \a buf.  This
 *     must not be NULL.
 *
 * \return
 *     0 on success, non-zero otherwise
 */
int foo_pack(
    uint8_t *buf,
    size_t buflen,
    size_t *packedlenp,
    const struct foo *foo);

/*! \see foo_pack() */
int bar_pack(
    uint8_t *buf,
    size_t buflen,
    size_t *packedlenp,
    const struct bar *bar);

These functions would be used like this:

/*! \return 0 on success, non-zero otherwise */
int
send_foo_and_bar(struct foo *foo, struct bar *bar)
{
    uint8_t bufstorage[MAX_MSG_LEN]
    uint8_t *buf = bufstorage;
    size_t buflen = sizeof(bufstorage);
    size_t tmp;
    size_t packedlen = 0;

    if (foo_pack(buf, buflen, &tmp, foo)) return -1;
    packedlen += tmp;
    if (tmp > buflen) tmp = buflen;
    buf += tmp;
    buflen -= tmp;

    if (bar_pack(buf, buflen, &tmp, bar)) return -1;
    packedlen += tmp;
    if (tmp > buflen) tmp = buflen;
    buf += tmp;
    buflen -= tmp;

    assert(packedlen <= sizeof(bufstorage));
    if (send_message(bufstorage, packedlen)) return -1;
    return 0;
}

Adjusting buf and buflen after each call seems awkward, especially since the following API style avoids the awkwardness:

/*!
 * \brief convert a <tt>struct foo</tt> to its network
 * representation
 *
 * \param[out] buf
 *     Buffer to contain the packed representation of \a foo.
 *     This may be NULL only if \a buflen is less than or equal to
 *     the value at \a offsetp.
 *
 * \param[in] buflen
 *     Length of the buffer at \a buf.  No more than <tt>buflen -
 *     *offsetp</tt> bytes will be written to \a buf.  If
 *     <tt>buflen <= *offsetp</tt>, no bytes will be written to \a
 *     buf and \a buf may be NULL.  (This can be useful for
 *     determining what the packed length of \a foo will be.)  If
 *     <tt>buflen - *offsetp</tt> is less than the length of the
 *     packed representation of \a foo, the packed representation
 *     will be truncated.
 *
 * \param[in,out] offsetp
 *     When this function is called, the value at this location
 *     indicates the offset into \a buf where the packed
 *     representation of \a bar should start.  On return, the
 *     value at this location will be set to the offset into \a
 *     buf that is right after the packed representation of \a
 *     foo, assuming \a buflen is big enough.  If NULL, an offset
 *     of 0 is assumed.  The length of the packed representation
 *     of \a foo can be determined by subtracting the value at
 *     this location before calling this function from the value
 *     at this location after calling this function (even if \a
 *     buflen is too small to store the packed represenation).
 *
 * \param[in] foo
 *     The structure to pack into \a buf.  This must not be NULL.
 *
 * \return
 *     0 on success, non-zero otherwise
 */
int foo_pack(
    uint8_t *buf,
    size_t buflen,
    size_t *offsetp,
    const struct foo *foo);

/*! \see foo_pack() */
int bar_pack(
    uint8_t *buf,
    size_t buflen,
    size_t *offsetp,
    const struct bar *bar);

These functions would be used like this:

/*! \return 0 on success, non-zero otherwise */
int
send_foo_and_bar(struct foo *foo, struct bar *bar)
{
    uint8_t buf[MAX_MSG_LEN];
    const size_t buflen = sizeof(buf);
    size_t offset = 0;

    if (foo_pack(buf, buflen, &offset, foo)) return -1;
    if (bar_pack(buf, buflen, &offset, bar)) return -1;

    assert(offset <= buflen);
    if (send_message(buf, offset)) return -1;
    return 0;
}

Notice how much simpler the code is, and how much harder it is to make a mistake.

My questions:

  • Am I correct that the former approach is more common/idiomatic?
  • If so, why isn't the latter approach used more often?
  • What are the advantages/disadvantages of each approach?
share|improve this question
    
Why would you pack two structures of different type??? –  meaning-matters Jul 31 '13 at 5:29
1  
@meaning-matters: Imagine struct foo and struct bar are members of a larger struct -- they're different pieces of a complete message. For example, foo could contain a header while bar contains the payload, both of which need to be sent over the network together. Or, perhaps foo contains game level state and bar contains the player state, both of which need to be saved together into the save file. –  Richard Hansen Jul 31 '13 at 5:47

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