Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've been for more than 3 hours trying to solve this problem, but it doesn't work 100%. Please help me.

Problem: Create a function that receives two strings (A and B) and show the number of times the word of string B appears in the A, without using any function that belong to the library. For example:

  • String A: house houuse househousehous
  • String B: house

It needs to show that the word house appears 3x in string A.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h> 
#include <conio.h> 
#include <string.h>

void count_string_b_a(char *a, char *b){
   int i,j,k=0,size_a,size_b,equal=0,cont=0;
   size_a = strlen(a); 
   size_b = strlen(b);
   j=0;
   for(i = 0; i < size_b; i++){ 
     for(j = 0; j < size_a; j++){ 
        k=0;
        equal=0;
        for(k=0; k<size_b; k++){
           if(a[j+k] == b[i+k]) equal++;
           if(equal==size_b) cont++;
        } 
      } 
   }    
   printf("B %s appears %d times in A %s",b,cont,a);
}

int main(){
   int i;
   char a[40], b[10];
   scanf("%[^\n]s",&a); getchar();
   scanf("%[^\n]s",&b);
   count_string_b_a(a,b);
   getch();
 }
share|improve this question
6  
Why not step through the code in your debugger until you see the problem ? – Paul R Jul 31 '13 at 7:32
3  
"without using any function that belong to the library" What could possibly be the motivation for avoiding library functions explicitly designed for working with strings? If the goal is to understand how those functions work, you can investigate the source code of popular implementations, but it's arguably more important to be able to use them than to be able to write them. – Cody Gray Jul 31 '13 at 7:36
2  
Isn't strlen() a function in the standard library? I have to assume you're allowed the I/O functions...But maybe the requirement is not to use any of the string search functions. The assignment k=0 before the for (k = 0; ...) loop is redundant. – Jonathan Leffler Jul 31 '13 at 7:36
1  
One reason for not using the debugger is that the algorithm is wrong. This is better resolved by thinking than debugging. You have two strings, a needle and a haystack. For each position in the haystack, you need to check whether the needle matches at the current position. For that, you need two nested loops, not three. – Jonathan Leffler Jul 31 '13 at 7:39
    
I think use strstr can be easily than implement by yourself, strstr is standard function of C language. – Yigang Wu Jul 31 '13 at 8:21
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well this is my approach at this problem of calculating how many times a word appears in a certain string. A custom mystrlen() function imitates the strlen function of C. The only header file you need is stdio.h



    #include <stdio.h>

    int mystrlen(char *s)
    {
        int length = 0;

        while(*s != '\0')
        {
            length++;
            s++;
        }
        return length;
    }

    void match(char *haystack, char* needle)
    {
            int j = 0;

            int i,counter=0;

            for(i = 0;i < mystrlen(haystack);i++)
            {

                if(haystack[i] == needle[j])
                {
                    if(j == mystrlen(needle)-1)
                    {
                        counter++;
                        j = 0;
                        continue;
                    }       
                }
                else{
                    j = 0;
                    continue;
                }
                j++;

            }
            printf("%d the counter shows",counter);
    }
    int main()
    {

        char *haystack = "house houuse househousehous";

        char *needle = "house";

        match(haystack,needle);


    }

share|improve this answer
    
Your solution is working almost 100%, i'll try to understand and find the error. For example if i write: char *haystack = "pencil pencil penciil pen penc pe pen55cil penci9llppencil55 pencillip peplic pencilrpencilpe"; and char *needle = "pencil"; The counter will show 5, and should be 6. Thank you very much – Roni Castro Jul 31 '13 at 21:45
    
The problem pattern for the pencil code is ppencil. The code does not count that correctly. It is also surprising to see only one explicit loop — that complicates the analysis. – Jonathan Leffler Jul 31 '13 at 22:14
if(equal==size_b) cont++;

needs in my opinion:

if(equal==size_b) {cont++;equal=0;}

to reset your counter to find a next match.

share|improve this answer

You should probably read the scanf manual, carefully. In fact, this goes for all standard library functions. %[^\n]s is not a derivative of the %s format specifier; It's a %[^\n] followed by an attempt to read (and discard) a literal 's' character. I suggest fixing it by removing the s from the end, and reading the manual before using any C standard library function for the first time. Don't forget to check the return value.

In what world are you allowed to use strlen, but not strncmp? Get rid of this:

 for(j = 0; j < size_a; j++){ 
    k=0;
    equal=0;
    for(k=0; k<size_b; k++){
       if(a[j+k] == b[i+k]) equal++;
       if(equal==size_b) cont++;
    } 
  }  

Use strncmp(&a[i], b) to determine equality, instead. If you can't use any standard library functions in this exercise, then write your own standard-compliant strlen and strncmp, and inline them manually into your function. You might then realise that your two inner-most loops weren't doing what they were supposed to. I would suggest that this exercise you are doing is a waste of time, because it's teaching you to do things the wrong way. If you must reinvent strncmp and strlen, then do so by writing your own strncmp and strlen.

share|improve this answer

use strstr like this

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int count_string_b_a(const char *a, const char *b){
    int count = 0;
    size_t lenb = strlen(b);
    const char *p = a;
    while(NULL != (p = strstr(p, b))){
        ++count;
        p += lenb;
    }
    return count;
}

int main(){
    int cont;
    char a[40], b[10];

    printf("A>");
    scanf("%39[^\n]", a);
    printf("B>");
    scanf(" %9[^\n]", b);
    cont = count_string_b_a(a, b);
    printf("B \"%s\" appears %d times in A \"%s\"\n", b, cont, a);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
case of A:"howhowhow" B:"howhow" , count 1. shoud be 2? – BLUEPIXY Jul 31 '13 at 9:08
    
Note the requirement 'without using any function that belong[s] to the library'. Obviously, the I/O functions are from 'the library'; we can reasonably interpret it as 'no string manipulation functions from the library'. – Jonathan Leffler Aug 3 '13 at 3:42

This is my simple-minded solution to the problem, using two loops as I suggested in a comment:

#include <stdio.h>

static
int count_occurrences(const char *haystack, const char *needle)
{
    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; haystack[i] != '\0'; i++)
    {
        int j;
        for (j = 0; needle[j] != '\0' && needle[j] == haystack[i+j]; j++)
            ;
        if (needle[j] == '\0')
            count++;
    }
    return count;
}

int main(void)
{
    {
    const char haystack[] = "house houuse househousehous";
    const char needle[] = "house";

    printf("Haystack <<%s>> vs needle <<%s>> = %d\n",
           haystack+0, needle+0, count_occurrences(haystack+0, needle+0));
    printf("Haystack <<%s>> vs needle <<%s>> = %d\n",
           haystack+1, needle+1, count_occurrences(haystack+1, needle+1));
    printf("Haystack <<%s>> vs needle <<%s>> = %d\n",
           haystack+1, needle+0, count_occurrences(haystack+1, needle+0));
    printf("Haystack <<%s>> vs needle <<%s>> = %d\n",
           haystack+1, needle+2, count_occurrences(haystack+1, needle+2));
    printf("Haystack <<%s>> vs needle <<%s>> = %d\n",
           haystack+6, needle+4, count_occurrences(haystack+6, needle+4));
    }

    {
    char *haystack = "pencil pencil penciil pen penc pe pen55cil penci9llppencil55 pencillip peplic pencilrpencilpe";
    char *needle = "pencil"; 
    printf("Haystack <<%s>> vs needle <<%s>> = %d\n",
           haystack+0, needle+0, count_occurrences(haystack+0, needle+0));
    }

    return 0;
}

Note how the calculation of the number of occurrences is done separately from the printing of the number of occurrences. The function that reports the number of occurrences could be generally useful; a function that also prints the data is unlikely to be reusable. Generally, separating I/O from computation is a good idea.

Sample output:

Haystack <<house houuse househousehous>> vs needle <<house>> = 3
Haystack <<ouse houuse househousehous>> vs needle <<ouse>> = 3
Haystack <<ouse houuse househousehous>> vs needle <<house>> = 2
Haystack <<ouse houuse househousehous>> vs needle <<use>> = 4
Haystack <<houuse househousehous>> vs needle <<e>> = 3
Haystack <<pencil pencil penciil pen penc pe pen55cil penci9llppencil55 pencillip peplic pencilrpencilpe>> vs needle <<pencil>> = 6

Better algorithms exist

The algorithm coded above is naïve; there are many better string matching algorithms available (Boyer-Moore, Knuth-Morris-Pratt, for example: see Exact String Matching Algorithms for examples). It does, however, work and is simple to understand. For the example strings, it probably doesn't matter; for bioinformatics and DNA fragment matching, it would matter a lot.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.