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I have a form with a button, a label and a progress bar, so that when I click the button it creates an instance of class b to run a process. Once the process is done it will call an EventHandler to show "done" in the main form's label!

I created an event (SetStatusEvent) of a delegate (SetStatus) to do this. And it seems fine when I call this event outside the EventHandler (usbforProcessExited) but when I call it from usbforProcessExited it gives an error -

object reference not set to an instance of an object

main form

public partial class main : Form
{
    b rsSet = new b();

    public main()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        rsSet.SetStatusEvent += new RemoteS.SetStatus(updateStatus);
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        rsSet.FormatUSB();
    }

    private delegate void UpdateStatus(int i, string str, Color clr);

    private void SetStatus(int i, string str, Color clr)
    {
        this.progressBar1.Value = i;
        this.lbl_status.ForeColor = clr;
        this.lbl_status.Text = str;
    }

    private void updateStatus(int i, String msg, Color color)
    {
        object[] p = GetInokerPara(i, msg, color);
        BeginInvoke(new UpdateStatus(SetStatus), p);
    }

    private object[] GetInokerPara(int progress, string msg, Color color)
    {
        object[] para = new object[3];
        para[0] = progress;
        para[1] = msg;
        para[2] = color;

        return para;
    }
}

class b

class b
{
    public delegate void SetStatus(int i, string msg, Color color);
    public event SetStatus SetStatusEvent;

    System.Diagnostics.Process usbfor = new System.Diagnostics.Process();

    public void FormatUSB()
    {

        usbfor.StartInfo.FileName = @"usbformat.bat";
        usbfor.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
        usbfor.Exited += new EventHandler(usbforProcessExited);
        usbfor.Start();
    }

    public void usbforProcessExited(object sender, EventArgs f)
    {
        SetStatusEvent(100, "DONE", Color.Green); //ERROR HERE! (object reference not set to an instance of an object
    }
}

Where is the problem?

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You should learn to produce minimal working examples. Your code contains lots of stuff that's not relevant to this question. –  CodesInChaos Jul 31 '13 at 7:36
    
I don't think it's the cause of your problem, but don't you need "usbfor.EnableRaisingEvents = true" for the process to raise the Exited event? –  Chris Spicer Jul 31 '13 at 7:48
    
@ChrisSpicer OPS! actually I do have that line! I was just trying to minimize the amount of code I post. Thanks for mentioning that part. –  daygoor Jul 31 '13 at 7:53
1  
You could consider replacing your b class and its events by a Task<T>. –  CodesInChaos Jul 31 '13 at 7:59
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have a race condition:

usbforProcessExited gets subscribed in the constructor of b and might be invoked before you called rsSet.SetStatusEvent += new RemoteS.SetStatus(updateStatus).

You should only call usbfor.Start() after you subscribed to SetStatusEvent.

A related problem is that the event will run on another thread. You should set rsSet.SynchronizingObject before starting the process so your event handler can modify the form without manually calling Invoke/BeginInvoke.

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The event is null, if there are no subscribers.

There are two solutions:

  1. Initialize the event when declaring (dummy subscriber doing nothing):

    public event SetStatus SetStatusEvent = delegate { };
    
  2. Check the event for null before raising (in a thread-safe way):

    public void usbforProcessExited(object sender, EventArgs f)
    {
        SetStatus setStatus = SetStatusEvent;
        if (setStatus != null)
        {
            setStatus(100, "DONE", Color.Green);
        }
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
The null check (even when done correctly) leads to a lost event in the OPs code. So it's not the solution here. –  daygoor Jul 31 '13 at 7:49
    
The null check would in this case only hide the symptom. –  Torbjörn Kalin Jul 31 '13 at 7:52
    
@daygoor You should still use this pattern when writing your Raise event methods. As you say in your own words (which is interesting since you are the OP), "when done correctly". –  Default Jul 31 '13 at 7:58
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The event is null, if noone subscribed to it yet. So it's a good practice to control on null equality, like:

    public void usbforProcessExited(object sender, EventArgs f)
    {
        if(SetStatusEvent!=null)
            SetStatusEvent(100, "DONE", Color.Green);
    }

That's why outside it works well, as you have, this line:

 rsSet.SetStatusEvent += new RemoteS.SetStatus(updateStatus);

so subscription and initilizaton of the event.

When you call it from inside, there is no any subscription made, so event is null.

EDIT

Following the comments let's provide more thread safe approach of handling null reference check on event:

   public void usbforProcessExited(object sender, EventArgs f)
    {
        var ev = SetStatusEvent; //[1]
        if(ev!=null) //[2]
            ev(100, "DONE", Color.Green);
    }

Remember that assignment operation ia atomic in CLR, so even in between lines [1] and [2] someone else reset event to null, your ev will be still valid and code will execute without crashing. IF this is desired behaviour or not it depends on your concrete case, so this is just another option to manage null reference control on event in thread-safe way.

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2  
Except that's not thread-safe - if the last subscriber unsubscribes between the check and the call, you'll end up with a NullReferenceException. That may or may not be a problem, depending on what threading you want to support. –  Jon Skeet Jul 31 '13 at 7:34
    
I normally do var handler = SetStatusEvent; first (although I cannot find the reference for why) –  Default Jul 31 '13 at 7:34
    
The null check (even when done correctly) leads to a lost event in the OPs code. So it's not the solution here. –  CodesInChaos Jul 31 '13 at 7:37
    
@CodesInChaos: he talks about "inside" and "outside", I believe he means calling that function from the "b" class and from "main" form respectively. Don't think there is any raise condition involvedhere, but simple wrong understanding of events intialization- –  Tigran Jul 31 '13 at 7:39
    
@CodesInChaos Even though it might not fix the current problem, it should still be coded correctly. –  Default Jul 31 '13 at 7:54
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