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While reviewing one of our C++ class through coverity, it showed an error message on a particular class. The class is as follows:

class InputRecord
{
    /* Construtor */
    ...
    InputRecord::RejectRecord();
    ...
    /* Destructor */
}

What is the significance of using an identifier inside the class? Is it a good practice to follow this?

Thanks, Mathew Liju

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

On gcc compilers (v4.1 and above) this would fail to compile with "error: extra qualification". It's therefore good practice not to put it there!

See here which discusses the extra qualification as not legal C++.

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not just gcc, any compiler except visual studio. –  deft_code Nov 25 '09 at 15:36

G'day,

I always thought that sort of identifier was only used in the implementation and wasn't necessary in the class definition.

A class declaration is

class InputRecord;

What you've got there is a class definition.

class InputRecord
{
    /* Construtor */
    ...
    RejectRecord();
    ...
    /* Destructor */
}

then in your .cpp file you have the implementation

InputRecord::RejectRecord()
{
    ...
}
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Even that is my understanding. Before making any decision on changing the program, I just want to confirm my understanding. Anyway thanks for the reply :-) –  Liju Mathew Nov 25 '09 at 12:07

In general, there aren't any cases where the disambiguation provided by the explicit InputRecord:: in your code sample are likely to be anything other than redundant.

If the code is doing complex manipulations where the specific class is relevant (say you're passing it to a base class that has a shadowed version), then it may help code clarity to make it explicit.

It's a bit like using this-> (or this. in C#/Java).

Personally I'd remove any such redundant specifiers and find another way of getting the point across.

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Actually I think both C++ and Java should force people to use this for member variables, so we dont have to name them mValue, m_value, m_Value, value_ etc anymore. –  Viktor Sehr Nov 25 '09 at 14:48
    
We have to name them m... ? :P From an Functional Programming perspective you'd like to be foreced to think before using state/ From an OO perspective it woudl be 'normal'. For certain types of things this would look really ugly. Some programming 'standards' say no prefixing as it should be clear from the code whether it is a member or param - which is fine if you're writing proper code. (I personally dont use Hungarian Notation but cling to prefixing [with '_'] knowing its wrong. I'd detest having to prefix this. everywhere). I think this is a clear case of there being no OSFA solution. –  Ruben Bartelink Nov 25 '09 at 15:10

In the class definition, I only use class identifiers if I have parameters that are named similarly (or the same) to private members of the class. It avoids ambiguity and also makes the code easier to read at the same time. I can't think of another case in which you would need to use it.

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