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I've got a Cube with one measure, which uses COUNT as aggregation function. The result of MDX queries looks something like this:

            | Germany | USA | Russia | France | Italy |
 ------------------------------------------------------
    2010    |   15    | 20  |  null  |  null  |  null |
    2011    |   20    | 25  |   10   |  null  |  null | 
    2012    |   25    | 30  |   15   |   5    |  null |
 2010 - 2012|   60    | 75  |   25   |   5    |  null |

For me it works just fine, but our customer wants the whole aggreagtion result to be null if one of the dimension elements is null. So the result has to look like this:

            | Germany | USA | Russia | France | Italy |
 ------------------------------------------------------
    2010    |   15    | 20  |  null  |  null  |  null |
    2011    |   20    | 25  |   10   |  null  |  null | 
    2012    |   25    | 30  |   15   |   5    |  null |
 2010 - 2012|   60    | 75  |  null  |  null  |  null |

And to make things more complicated this behavior should be the same, when the time dimension is put on the slice axis. So the Result for the following MDX query

SELECT [Area].[Germany]:[Area].[Italy] on 0
FROM ExampleCube
WHERE ([Year].[2010]:[Year].[2012])

should look like this

            | Germany | USA | Russia | France | Italy |
 ------------------------------------------------------
            |   60    | 75  |  null  |  null  |  null |

Exists a way in SSAS and/or MDX to achieve this behavior?

share|improve this question
    
This is typically the kind of technical challenge which should not happen. I mean, you should really try to understand WHY your customer are expecting this non-standard (and probably useless) behaviour before implementing it. They probably think that there request is smart but it is really not. Show them some samples, argue and they will remove this request. –  Cédric L. Charlier Jan 26 at 15:36
    
First thanks for your reply. –  AlM Jan 28 at 9:39
    
I asked them WHY they need that, its just because out of convenience reasons. They have realy fragmented data and they are to lazy to double check the results. So if a strange result appears they don't want to check, if it's because of the missing data. But also in some cases it would be hard to detect if a result should be investigated more thoroughly. –  AlM Jan 28 at 9:48
    
Nevertheless I came up with an ugly solution. First you need to add a new fact table, that contains two columns the years and a column that contains a 1 for each year you got data and a 0 for each you don't. Create a calculated measure that gets 0 as soon you got 0 within your query result. Make this measure invisible and the first one too. Create a third (visible) measure that shows the count aggregation as long the result of the second measure is 1, otherwise return NULL. This solution works for us, though it's realy ugly and hard to maintain. –  AlM Jan 28 at 10:00
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