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I know it's possible to make your app open files by changing the info.plist in xcode

Is it possible to have your app open for example a .properties file, which is a plist containing personal user settings i.e. a login username and password, and get your app to read and import this?

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You shouldn't put a password into a plist file. That's could be a security issue. – Larme Jul 31 '13 at 8:47
    
You mean open it if it was e-mailed to you or something else? – Wain Jul 31 '13 at 8:47
    
Yes it is very possible. You can write/read any plist file even iOS and MAC OSX itself write some app related data by itself in app Sandbox area by UserDefaults but I think Username & Password you shouldn't write in plist because of security reasons. – The Hulk Jul 31 '13 at 8:49
    
@Wain Yes, if it was emailed. – Chris Byatt Jul 31 '13 at 8:51
    
@SuryakantSharma I agree, however the data isn't confidential and the passwords are randomly generated. The way my app works is it stores the manually entered settings in a plist. Are you saying I can overwrite this? – Chris Byatt Jul 31 '13 at 8:52
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes you can.

Your iOS app can handle some file extension you want to, but take care about the security issue!

Take a look to this tutorial:

http://www.raywenderlich.com/1980/how-to-import-and-export-app-data-via-email-in-your-ios-app

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You can always read a plist file and import them, provided the plist is part of your app's sandbox. If you want to have settings and preferences, you can prefer settings bundle which also is a plist file.

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The way my app works is it stores the manually entered settings in a plist. Are you saying I can overwrite this? – Chris Byatt Jul 31 '13 at 8:52
    
Yes you can overwrite it. – Prazad Jul 31 '13 at 9:05

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