Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

With

public class SuperType {
}

and

public class TestClass<T extends SuperType > {

    public void doSomething() {
        List<T> list = new ArrayList<T>();
        list.add(new SuperType ()); // ERROR
    }
}

it won't compile, giving me

The method add(T) in the type List is not applicable for the arguments (SuperType)

But why?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Assume you have

public class SuperType {
}

public class SubType extends SuperType {
}

and use TestClass<SubType> your code becomes

public class TestClass<SubType> {

    public void doSomething() {
        List<SubType> list = new ArrayList<SubType>();
        list.add(new SuperType ());
    }
}

That has to error because a new SuperType() is not specific enough. It has to be at least a SubType.

share|improve this answer

You should have got something in line of-

SuperType cannot be converted to T by method invocation conversion

Meaning using type declaration in implementation is not valid.

When you say-

T extends SuperType

You are actually saying that the parameter can be a SuperType or any subtype of your SuperType.

Should be-

List<SuperType> list = new ArrayList<SuperType>();
share|improve this answer

The type is only meant for sub classes of SuperType but not the SuperType itself. Instead use

List<SuperType> list = new ArrayList<SuperType>();
list.add(new SuperType ()); 
share|improve this answer

Type only used to express what all type it can be , in your case it can be of anytype that is a subclass of SuperType and Supertype itself.

Thanks

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.