Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a text file like this [End-of-Line-characters in square brackets].

Clearly somethings wrong here and I want to remove the empty lines. How can I do this?

I would prefer a bash solution, but also others are welcome.

717016|2026493|88650639|Agridex|Carrier|NR||V/V||NR|||1||NR||NR||NR[CR][LF]
717016|2026493|88650639|Agridex|Carrier|NR||V/V||NR|||1||NR||NR||NR[CR][LF]
717018|2026494|67685|Sulfinyl bis(methane)|Carrier|NR||NR||NR|||NR||NR||NR||10% OF CARRIER SOLUTION[CR]
[CR][LF]
[CR][LF]
717019|2026494|57556|1,2-Propanediol|Carrier|NR||NR||NR|||NR||NR||NR||40% OF CARRIER SOLUTION[CR][LF]
717016|2026493|88650639|Agridex|Carrier|NR||V/V||NR|||1||NR||NR||NR[CR][LF]

This did not work (dont know why..):

sed -i '/^$/d' file.txt

UPDATE My desired output is

717016|2026493|88650639|Agridex|Carrier|NR||V/V||NR|||1||NR||NR||NR[CR][LF]
717016|2026493|88650639|Agridex|Carrier|NR||V/V||NR|||1||NR||NR||NR[CR][LF]
717018|2026494|67685|Sulfinyl bis(methane)|Carrier|NR||NR||NR|||NR||NR||NR||10% OF CARRIER SOLUTION[CR][LF]
717019|2026494|57556|1,2-Propanediol|Carrier|NR||NR||NR|||NR||NR||NR||40% OF CARRIER SOLUTION[CR][LF]
717016|2026493|88650639|Agridex|Carrier|NR||V/V||NR|||1||NR||NR||NR[CR][LF]

So the third line ends with [CR][LF] and lines 4 + 5 are removed.

share|improve this question
    
I am on Linux, but it is likely that the file is from windows. –  EDi Jul 31 '13 at 10:45

4 Answers 4

Use \r to represent LF:

sed '/^\r$/d' file

Or, run dos2unix on the file to get rid of the linefeeds.

share|improve this answer
    
I believe this works with gnu sed only since sed on OSX doesn't like this command. –  anubhava Jul 31 '13 at 10:34
    
Thanks, this removes one of the two [CR][LF] lines, however in the line before the empty lines I have only a [CR]. See my update. –  EDi Jul 31 '13 at 10:39
    
dos2unix works! –  EDi Jul 31 '13 at 10:46

Try this sed command:

sed -i.bak '/^ *'$'\r''*$/d' file
share|improve this answer

Notepad++ offer (you mention others are welcome!):

SO17967892 example

Edit for clarification to question:

First replace double [CR] with single, then Edit, Line Operations, Remove Empty Lines.

share|improve this answer

try:

grep "|" textfile.txt > output.txt

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.