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I am currently trying to figure out a good way to sort my elements with LINQ and C#, but I am kinda failing to do so.

For the problem let assume you have the following Table

---TempTable
ID (int)
ParentID (int)
Name (varchar)
SortOrder (int)

The ID and ParentID are related to each other and give me a self hierachical data structure. The root elements have a null in the ID Field. The SortOrder is only a portion of the whole table and based on the ParentID, so the elements that share the same ParentID do have 1, 2, 3 in it.

Lets further assume the following data:

ID = 1
ParentID = null
Name = Test 1
SortOrder = 1

ID = 2
ParentID = 1
Name = Test 2
SortOrder = 1

ID = 3
ParentID = 1
Name = Test 3
SortOrder = 2

ID = 4
ParentID = 2
Name = Test 4
SortOrder = 1

My desired flat list should have the following order:

Test 1 //root element with sort order 1 = very top
Test 2 //child element of root with sort order 1
Test 4 //child element of test 2 with sort order 1
Test 3 //child element of root with sort order 2

Also I like to get the object itself without only getting a portion of information threw the usage of select new ...

This is one of my failed tries:

from x in EntityModel.TempTables //DbSet<TempTable> by EntityFramework - which already holds all elements
   orderby x.SortOrder
   from y in x.TempTableChildren //Navigation Property by EntityFramework
   orderby y.SortOrder
   select y

Thanks in advance for your help.

Edit:

The order with the ParentID maybe helpfull, with the given TestData since the ID, ParentIDs are in perfect order but this isnt the case in a real live application since its data driven, someone could delete a entry create a new one and place it in a certain order under a parent and you would have something like :

ID = 193475037
ParentID = 2
Name = Test 192375937
SortOrder = 25

Now in the application it would be possible to move this one and the ParentID and SortOrder would change randomly to something like:

ID = 193475037
ParentID = 456798424
Name = Test 192375937
SortOrder = 4

To furhter explain the problem here is some code - how I would do it without 1 beautifull Linq Query but with 2 and some yield return:

public class LinqTestDemo
{
    Random rand = new Random();
    List<TempTable> list = new List<TempTable>();

    public List<TempTable> GetFlatData()
    {
        list = GetTestData();

        var rootElement = (from x in list
                            where x.ParentID == null
                            orderby x.SortOrder
                            select x).ToList();

        var flatList = OrderChilds(rootElement).ToList();

        foreach (var tempTable in flatList)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("ID = {0} - ParentID = {1} - Name = {2} - SortOrder = {3}", tempTable.ID, tempTable.ParentID, tempTable.Name, tempTable.SortOrder));
        }

        return flatList;
    }

    private IEnumerable<TempTable> OrderChilds(List<TempTable> enumerable)
    {
        foreach (var tempTable in enumerable)
        {
            yield return tempTable;

            TempTable table = tempTable;
            var childs = OrderChilds((from x in list
                                        where x.ParentID == table.ID
                                        orderby x.SortOrder
                                        select x).ToList());

            foreach (var child in childs)
            {
                yield return child;
            }
        }
    }

    public List<TempTable> GetTestData()
    {
        var returnValue = new List<TempTable>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
        {
            var tempTable = new TempTable();
            tempTable.ID = i;
            if (i == 0)
                tempTable.ParentID = null;
            else
                tempTable.ParentID = rand.Next(0, i);

            var maxSortOrder = (from x in returnValue
                                where x.ParentID == tempTable.ParentID
                                select (int?)x.SortOrder).Max();

            if (maxSortOrder.HasValue)
                tempTable.SortOrder = maxSortOrder.Value + 1;
            else
                tempTable.SortOrder = 1;

            tempTable.Name = string.Format("Test {0:00}", i);
            returnValue.Add(tempTable);
        }

        return returnValue;
    }

    public class TempTable
    {
        public int ID { get; set; }
        public int? ParentID { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public int SortOrder { get; set; }
    }
}

@ Breadth-First vs Depth-First Traversal: After some reading I would say my desired result would be Depth-First Traversal, where the elements at the same level depth should be ordered by the property SortOrder.

share|improve this question
3  
Your table-structure defines a tree structure - and therefore, there are two ways to "traverse" the tree in order to produce a flat structure. Depth first: cs.bu.edu/teaching/c/tree/breadth-first Breadth First: brpreiss.com/books/opus4/html/page551.html It's not clear from your example which traversal type you're referring to. –  Dave Bish Jul 31 '13 at 10:50
    
After some reading I would say my desired result would be Depth-First Traversal, where the elements at the same level depth should be ordered by the property SortOrder. –  Rand Random Jul 31 '13 at 12:41
    
How many levels of depth are there? If you can have unlimited depth then it is not possible in single query. Also the way entity framework works, it fails on queries of recursive nature. The only solution is tree traversal. –  Akash Kava Aug 9 '13 at 8:48
    
It can have unlimited depth, there should be no restrictions. –  Rand Random Aug 9 '13 at 13:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50
  public lEnumerable<TempTable> GetList( int? parentID = null){

     foreach ( var item in Context.TempTables
        .Where( x => x.ParentID == parentID )
        .OrderBy( x=> x.SortOrder)
        .ToList() {

        yield return item;

        foreach( var child in GetList( item.ID))
        {
            yield return child;
        }

     }
  }


  var sortedList = GetList();

It is similar to your method but it is smaller & recursive. And works for many depth levels. I prefer calling ToList because it will close resultset before querying next query.

There is no way to do this in single query as of now.

With Single Query as Requested

Entity Framework will automatically fill all children.

 public IEnumerable<TempTable> PrepareList(IEnumerable<TempTable> list){
     list = list.OrderBy( x=> x.SortOrder);
     foreach(var item in list){
         yield return item;
         foreach(var child in PrepareList(item.ChildTempTables)){
             yield return child;
         }
     }
 }

 // since EF will automatically fill each children on fetch
 // all we need is just a top level nodes
 // which we will pass to PrepareList method
 var list = Context.TempTables.ToList().Where(x=> x.ParentID == null);
 var sortedList = PrepareList(list).ToList();

 // it is good to create list at the end if you are going to 
 // iterate it many times and logic will not change.
share|improve this answer
    
Could you please modify your code, so that the initial list (in your case Context.TempTables) could be a already queried IEnumerable that gets passed and sorted by the requirement, as you may notice the other 2 "new" answers (by Thomas B. and Roman Pekar) both have a solution for this scenario. How would you do this? Thx for your time. –  Rand Random Aug 9 '13 at 13:04
    
@RandRandom I have added the answer that will do the same job with everything preloaded. –  Akash Kava Aug 9 '13 at 13:34

Try this:

public class Item
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public int? ParentID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int SortOrder { get; set; }
}

public void DoWork()
    {
        Item[] data = new Item[] {
            new Item() { ID = 2, ParentID = 1, Name = "Test 2", SortOrder = 1},
            new Item() { ID = 3, ParentID = 1, Name = "Test 3", SortOrder = 2},
            new Item() { ID = 4, ParentID = 2, Name = "Test 4", SortOrder = 1},
            new Item() { ID = 1, ParentID = null, Name = "Test 1", SortOrder = 1},
        };

        var result = from x in data
                     orderby x.SortOrder, x.ParentID
                     select x;

        foreach (var row in result.ToArray())
        {
            Console.WriteLine(row.Name);
        }
    }

I guess it's all about the proper ordering

share|improve this answer
    
Please have a look at my edit, dont know if you are getting a notification about the edit wihout this comment. –  Rand Random Jul 31 '13 at 12:37

Here's a simple solution:

public class TempTable
{
    public int ID {get;set;}
    public int? ParentID {get;set;}
    public String Name {get;set;}
    public int SortOrder {get;set;}
}

public List<TempTable> GetTempData()
{
    var temp = new List<TempTable>();
    temp.Add(new TempTable { ID = 1, ParentID = null, Name = "Test 1", SortOrder = 1 });
    temp.Add(new TempTable { ID = 2, ParentID = 1, Name = "Test 2", SortOrder = 1 });
    temp.Add(new TempTable { ID = 3, ParentID = 1, Name = "Test 3", SortOrder = 3 });
    temp.Add(new TempTable { ID = 4, ParentID = 2, Name = "Test 4", SortOrder = 1 });
    temp.Add(new TempTable { ID = 5, ParentID = 1, Name = "Test 5", SortOrder = 2 });
    return temp;
}

Usage:

var data = GetTempData();
var result = data.OrderBy(d => d.SortOrder).ThenBy(d => d.ParentID);
//Do something with result
share|improve this answer
    
Please have a look at my edit, dont know if you are getting a notification about the edit wihout this comment. –  Rand Random Jul 31 '13 at 12:38

Here's a non-recursive version. It won't iterate again and again over the initial list. Instead it maintains a dictionary for the parent-to-children relationship and stores the current position of the ongoing pre-order tree traversal in enumerators.

public static IEnumerable<TempTable> PreorderForest(IEnumerable<TempTable> list)
{
    var nodesByParent = list.GroupBy(x => x.ParentID.GetValueOrDefault(-1))
        .ToDictionary(xs => xs.Key, 
                      xs => xs.OrderBy(x => x.SortOrder).GetEnumerator());

    var stack = new Stack<IEnumerator<TempTable>>();
    stack.Push(nodesByParent[-1]);

    while (stack.Count > 0)
    {
        var nodes = stack.Peek();
        if (nodes.MoveNext())
        {
            yield return nodes.Current;
            IEnumerator<TempTable> children;
            if (nodesByParent.TryGetValue(nodes.Current.ID, out children))
                stack.Push(children);
        }
        else
            stack.Pop();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you maybe explain why you did a non-recursive version? Isnt the stack causing an unnessacary overhead? –  Rand Random Aug 9 '13 at 13:12
    
The default (functionn call) stack size for .NET applications is 4MB@64-bit and 1MB@32-bit. The Stack-Datacollection used here resides on the heap and is limited by the .NET object heap size limit of 2GB. So, for very very deep hierarchies a recursive version would throw an exception far before the non-recursive. And in addition: a recursive implementation is usually slower due to the calling-overhead. (Nonetheless: non-recursion is more complex and lacks readability) –  Thomas B. Aug 9 '13 at 13:26

Actually I don't know if it could be made by elegant LINQ query. Here's recursive version of DFS, it builds lookup to speed up search by ParentID

public static IEnumerable<TempTable> SortedList(IEnumerable<TempTable> list = null, int? ParentID = null, ILookup<int?, TempTable> lookup = null)
{
    if (lookup == null)
        lookup = list.ToLookup(x => x.ParentID, x => x);

    foreach (var p in lookup[ParentID].OrderBy(x => x.SortOrder))
    {
        yield return p;
        foreach (var c in SortedList(lookup: lookup, ParentID: p.ID))
            yield return c;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure if a lookup is necessary in a Entity Framework environment, isnt it the case that EF already provides an inbuilt key search for the primary/foreign key values? If thats not the case in what scenarios is it better to do a lookup over a "normal" LINQ query or is it more a gernal thing if you are continously quering an INT value use lookup? –  Rand Random Aug 9 '13 at 13:10
    
Well, it's more general solution with list, not table, can't say about inbuild keys in entity framework. So lookup here helps to not iterated over the whole list for each ID. –  Roman Pekar Aug 9 '13 at 13:26

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