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I have a following query (simplified):

SELECT
    Id
FROM
    dbo.Entity
WHERE
    1 = ALL (
        SELECT
            CASE
                WHEN {Condition} THEN 1
                ELSE 0
            END
        FROM
            dbo.Related
            INNER JOIN dbo.Entity AS TargetEntity ON
                TargetEntity.Id = Related.TargetId
        WHERE
            Related.SourceId = Entity.Id
    )

where {Condition} is a complex dynamic condition on TargetEntity.

In simple terms, this query should return entities for which all related entities match the required condition.

Unfortunately, that does not work quite well, since by SQL standard 1 = ALL evaluates to TRUE when ALL is applied to an empty set. I know I can add AND EXISTS, but that will require me to repeat the whole subquery, which, I am certain, will cause problems for performance.

How should I rewrite the query to achieve the result I need (SQL Server 2008)?

Thanks in advance.

Note: practically speaking, the whole query is highly dynamic, so the perfect solution would be to rewrite only 1 = ALL ( ... ), since changing top-level select can cause problems when additional conditions are added to top-level where.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Couldn't you use a min to achieve this?

EG:

SELECT
    Id
FROM
    dbo.Entity
WHERE
    1 = (
        SELECT
            MIN(CASE
                WHEN {Condition} THEN 1
                ELSE 0
            END)
        FROM
            dbo.Related
            INNER JOIN dbo.Entity AS TargetEntity ON
                TargetEntity.Id = Related.TargetId
        WHERE
            Related.SourceId = Entity.Id
    )

The min should return null if there's no clauses, 1 if they're all 1 and 0 if there's any 0's, and comparing to 1 should only be true for 1.

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Looks great, I am going to try this right now. –  Andrey Shchekin Nov 25 '09 at 13:45
    
Works great, thanks. –  Andrey Shchekin Nov 25 '09 at 13:51

It can be translated to pick Entities where no related entities with unmatched condition exist.

This can be accomplished by:

SELECT
    Id
FROM
    dbo.Entity
WHERE
    NOT EXISTS (
//as far as I have an element which do not match the condition, skip this entity
        SELECT TOP 1 1
        FROM
            dbo.Related
            INNER JOIN dbo.Entity AS TargetEntity ON
                TargetEntity.Id = Related.TargetId
        WHERE
            Related.SourceId = Entity.Id AND
            CASE
                WHEN {Condition} THEN 1
                ELSE 0
            END = 0
    )

EDIT: depending on condition, you can write something like:
WHERE Related.SourceId = Entity.Id AND NOT {Condition} if it doesn't change too much the complexity of the query.

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I think if there are no related entities at all, NOT EXISTS will be TRUE here (which is the same problem that I am having with ALL). –  Andrey Shchekin Nov 25 '09 at 13:28

Instead of using all, change your query to compare the result of the subquery directly:

select Id
  from dbo.Entity
  where 1 = (
      select 
        case 
          when ... then 1
          else 0
        end
        from ...
        where ...
      )
share|improve this answer
    
Subquery returned more than 1 value. This is not permitted when the subquery follows =, !=, <, <= , >, >= or when the subquery is used as an expression. –  Andrey Shchekin Nov 25 '09 at 13:41
    
oh yeah - oops - sorry for the distraction... –  Ray Nov 25 '09 at 13:58

Probably this will work: WHERE NOT 0 = ANY(...)

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No, does not work for an empty set either. 0 = ANY return false for an empty set (which is expected), so NOT 0 = ANY returns TRUE, which is the same as 1 = ALL. –  Andrey Shchekin Nov 25 '09 at 14:22

If I read the query correctly, it can be simplified to something like:

SELECT       e.Id
FROM         dbo.Entity e
INNER JOIN   dbo.Related r ON r.SourceId = e.Id
INNER JOIN   dbo.Entity te ON te.Id = r.TargetId
WHERE        <extra where stuff>
GROUP BY     e.Id
HAVING       SUM(CASE WHEN {Condition} THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) = COUNT(*)

This says the Condition must be true for all rows. It filters the "empty" set case away with the INNER JOINs.

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This does work in the given case. However, see my note. There are situations when top-level where can contain two of such conditions, for example. –  Andrey Shchekin Nov 25 '09 at 14:18
    
@Andrey Shchekin: This one supports WHERE as well (edited). Anyway, fyjham's answer is pretty good –  Andomar Nov 25 '09 at 14:28

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