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I am designing Android software where I have to listen n-amount of ports, lets say 10. Every 100ms I want to check out if ports have a new UDP-packet. After receiving packet, the data inside should be passed to the UI-thread.

My question is should I use one thread to receive data from all different ports or should I create own thread for every port, each timed to run at 100ms interval? What is the good practice in these cases?

When port has data, it is deserialized to an object, which is then used to update data in Views in the UI-thread.

I'm quite new with socket-programming and more advanced concurrent-programming so I have been hesitating with this for time without finding any good answers from the web.

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If you are going to check each 100ms, you will have to use timers that are threaded anyhow –  bas Jul 31 '13 at 12:10
    
Yeah, I'm just not sure if I should create one timed thread and check inside it each port. –  Tumetsu Jul 31 '13 at 12:27
    
you should create threads for capturing the data and one timer that checks those threads each 100ms –  bas Jul 31 '13 at 12:29
    
Why would you want to use timed polling for UDP messages? Why not just wait for them and handle them as soon an they arrive? –  Martin James Jul 31 '13 at 13:27
    
Eh, wait a second. I could run code always when I receive a new packet without polling? How? –  Tumetsu Aug 1 '13 at 7:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Having a thread per socket seems like overkill and unless the time to de-serialize the object is excessive then you won't see any benefit.

Personally (and like bas pointed out; there's not much in it) I would start out simple and have a single thread checking the 10 ports round-robin and sleeping between the checks. If you start to find that the Thread is taking too much time processing the data and the time between each port being checked is too high then you can add more threads to the pool at that point.

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Thanks. I think that is probably the way I'm going to go now since deserialization shouldn't take too much time. –  Tumetsu Jul 31 '13 at 12:33
    
What? 10 threads is overkill? –  Martin James Jul 31 '13 at 13:25
    
Okay, overkill was the wrong word. Maybe "over-engineering" would be more apt. –  StuPointerException Jul 31 '13 at 13:41
My question is should I use one thread to receive data from all different ports or 
should I create own thread for every port, each timed to run at 100ms interval? 
What is the good practice in these cases?

It does not really matter that much. If you create one thread, you will have to keep track of the different ports. If you create multiple thread you have to keep track of all these threads. Since cpu's are usually multi-threaded nowadays I would go for multiple threads.

As for the 100 ms timer interval, you can create one timer that loops through all threads and collects data from these threads. Make sure you lock it, so that if the timer elapses while the former event is still busy collecting data, these two don't interfere with each other.

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Okay, thanks. I was just wondering if there would be anything to win by using separate threads for each port since imo usually more threads = more complexity, at least in this case. –  Tumetsu Jul 31 '13 at 12:31
    
'more threads = more complexity'? You have to put a '0..9' for loop round the thread create. Doesn't sound all that extra complex to me. –  Martin James Jul 31 '13 at 13:29

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