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I wrote some code to measure cpu cycles per byte. I'm getting negative cpb but dont know why ... It shows me that cpb = -0.855553 cycles/byte

My pseudocode:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

uint64_t rdtsc(){
    unsigned int lo,hi;
    __asm__ __volatile__ ("rdtsc" : "=a" (lo), "=d" (hi));
    return ((uint64_t)hi << 32) | lo;
}

int main()
{
    long double inputsSize = 1024;
    long double counter = 1;

    long double cpuCycleStart = rdtsc();

        while(counter < 3s)
            function(args);

    long double cpuCycleEnd = rdtsc();

        long double cpb = ((cpuCycleEnd - cpuCycleStart) / (counter *  inputsSize));

    printf("%Lf cycles/byte\n", cpb);

    return 0;
}

EDIT, IMPROVED CODE, RESULTS ARE THE SAME (NEGATIVE):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

unsigned long rdtsc( void )
    {
        unsigned long lo, hi;
        asm( "rdtsc" : "=a" (lo), "=d" (hi) );
        return( lo );
    }

int main()
{
    long double counter;
    long double inputsSize = 1024;
    char *buff = createInput(inputsSize);

    long double cpuCycleStart = rdtsc();
        countDownTime(3.0);
    for(counter=1; !secondsElapsed; counter++)
            function(args);
    long cpuCycleEnd = rdtsc();

        long double cpb = ((cpuCycleEnd - cpuCycleStart) / (counter *  inputsSize));

    printf("%Lf cycles/byte\n", cpb);

    return 0;
}

Its really strange. Wrote testing code:

printf("\n%lu cpuCycleEnd \n%lu cpuCycleStart \n", cpuCycleEnd, cpuCycleStart);
    printf("\n%lu counter\n%lu inputsSize \n\n", counter, inputsSize);

        long double cpb = (((long double)cpuCycleEnd - (long double)cpuCycleStart) / ((long double)counter *  (long double)inputsSize));

    printf("%Lf cycles/byte\n", cpb);

which shows:

30534991 cpuCycleEnd 
1139165971 cpuCycleStart 

1273029 counter
1024 inputsSize 

-0.850450 cycles/byte

any ideas?

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3  
Why are you storing a uint64_t into a long double? –  Dan Jul 31 '13 at 12:24
2  
Incidentally, on modern processors, rdtsc is defined to measure real time (wall-clock time), not processor time. Intel changed the specification years ago. It will not measure processor cycles in the presence of processor speed changes or various power states. –  Eric Postpischil Jul 31 '13 at 12:27
1  
Before the existing printf, print the values of cpuCycleEnd, cpuCycleStart, counter, and inputsSize separately. If counter or inputsSize are negative, figure out why and fix them. If cpuCycleEnd is less than cpuCycleStart, figure out why. Did the counter wrap? Are they close to other values returned by rdtsc calls (if you insert more calls to see)? Is unsigned long 64 bits in your C implementation? If you print the value of rdtsc as an unsigned long, is it the same value that is printed after converting it to double? –  Eric Postpischil Jul 31 '13 at 12:37
1  
Note that 64-bit double cannot store all the bits of a 64-bit unsigned long. If the rdtsc values have some of the high nine bits set, you may be getting rounding errors. This should result in losing precision but not negative values (the effects of rounding should be monotonic) in the subtraction, until the counter wraps. In any case, it is better to store rdtsc values as uint64_t until after they are subtracted, then convert the result of subtracting to double if desired. –  Eric Postpischil Jul 31 '13 at 12:40
1  
I get a negative result (often) when I compile and execute for i386 (unsigned long is 32 bits) but not when I compile and execute for x86_64 (unsigned long is 64 bits). Check that your build target is a 64-bit target. Add a statement printf("sizeof(unsigned long) is %zu bytes.\n", sizeof(unsigned long)); and see whether it prints eight. It would be preferable to #include <stdint.h> and use uint64_t instead of unsigned long. Also, I had to make a number of modifications to compile. If the problem persists, please post a self-contained compilable example. –  Eric Postpischil Jul 31 '13 at 12:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are compiling for a target in which unsigned long is 32 bits.

You should #include <stdint.h> and use uint64_t instead of unsigned long. Additionally, you may want to compile for a target in which unsigned long is 64 bits.

(Note: To print a uint64_t, #include <inttypes.h> and use printf("%" PRIu64 "\n", value);.)

share|improve this answer
    
I get: error: impossible register constraint in ‘asm’ when I changed it to uint64_t. –  nullpointer Jul 31 '13 at 12:52
2  
@nullpointer: This works for me: uint64_t lo, hi; __asm__("rdtsc" : "=a" (lo), "=d" (hi)); return hi << 32 | lo; when compiling for -arch x86_64. If you are compiling for -arch i386, then you may need to make lo and hi 32-bit integers (uint32_t) and use return (uint64_t) hi << 32 | lo;. –  Eric Postpischil Jul 31 '13 at 13:04
    
thanks, this worked: pastie.org/private/7n1q6ccagthqo70bvhmcq (hope its finally ok now?). Also, another question. Finally I have non-negative results, take a look: pastie.org/private/4c9taxfaljgft5spbyv3nq. Is everything ok now with variables types? –  nullpointer Jul 31 '13 at 14:53
    
can I use uint64_t and uint32_t also for windows, lets say mingw and visual? –  nullpointer Jul 31 '13 at 15:07
1  
@nullpointer: If you are asking about using uint64_t and uint32_t in this rdtsc and timing code when building for different platforms, then, yes, you should seek to use these types, as long as they do not run into compiler issues (e.g., the use of asm and its operand constraints may be finicky). –  Eric Postpischil Jul 31 '13 at 15:54

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