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I wrote a C# application for a client a couple of years ago, but I no longer have the source code. All I have is the EXE that I deployed on the client's PC. Is there a way I can generate C# source code from the EXE?

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OP asks how to de-compile a program, gets several legitimate and helpful answers, and this is closed as "not constructive"? Please explain how this is not constructive. –  StingyJack Feb 11 '13 at 14:32
    
@StingyJack - If you get 5-6 different answers, that surely sounds not constructive. Which answer is the correct one? –  Bo Persson Feb 11 '13 at 14:56
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All of them. Each solves the posed question with a different answer. Are you telling me there is one and only one legitimate solution to every problem? –  StingyJack Feb 11 '13 at 15:49
    
@StingyJack funny, this last comment has more upvotes than the number of votes it took to close the question... Looks like it was reopened though, and then protected. –  retailcoder Mar 6 '13 at 2:21
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8 Answers

up vote 104 down vote accepted

Reflector and its add-in FileDisassembler.

Reflector will allow to see the source code. FileDisassembler will allow you to convert it into a VS solution.

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Your post on FileDisassembler appeared as the page refreshed when I made my answer on FileDisassembler :-) You win. –  ProfK Oct 7 '08 at 18:33
    
His Reflector link works, too, which is what took it. Thanks for helping me look less stupid to the client. –  MusiGenesis Oct 7 '08 at 18:35
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@musigenesis: No prob, that is what we are here for... I think... –  GEOCHET Oct 7 '08 at 18:37
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My copy of Reflector has an "Export..." option and I have no plug-ins installed. It creates a VS project with all the source code and resources. So why is everyone suggesting FileDisassembler? It is better? –  Lucas Oct 7 '08 at 22:10
    
Lucas: Out of the box, I have not seen reflector able to do this. FileDisassembler has always been the only way. This may have changed in recent history though I guess. I will check it out. –  GEOCHET Oct 8 '08 at 11:49
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When Red Gate said there would no longer be a free version of .Net Reflector, I started using ILSpy and Telerik's JustDecompile. I have found ILSpy to decompile more accurately than JustDecompile (which is still in Beta). Red Gate has changed their decision and still have a free version of .Net Reflector, but now I like ILSpy.

From the ILSpy website (http://www.ilspy.net/):

ILSpy is the open-source .NET assembly browser and decompiler.

ILSpy Features

  • Assembly browsing
  • IL Disassembly
  • Decompilation to C#
  • Supports lambdas and 'yield return'
  • Shows XML documentation
  • Saving of resources
  • Search for types/methods/properties (substring)
  • Hyperlink-based type/method/property navigation
  • Base/Derived types navigation
  • Navigation history
  • BAML to XAML decompiler
  • Save Assembly as C# Project
  • Find usage of field/method
  • Extensible via plugins (MEF)

Update:

April 15, 2012, ILSpy 2.0 was released. New features compared with version 1.0:

  • Assembly Lists
  • Support for decompiling Expression trees
  • Support for lifted operatores on nullables
  • Decompile to Visual Basic
  • Search for multiple strings separated by space (searching for "Assembly manager" in ILSpy.exe would find AssemblyListManager)
  • Clicking on a local variable will highlight all other occurrences of that variable
  • Ctrl+F can be used to search within the decompiled code view

Update:

  • ILSpy 2.1 supports async/await decompilation
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Reflector is no longer free... But a few companies like DevExtras and JetBrains have created free alternatives:

DevExtras CodeReflect

JetBrains DotPeek

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Reflector is like 35$. Breaking the bank I know, but its worth 10x that. –  StingyJack Oct 5 '11 at 16:55
    
actually the alternatives listed here work better than Reflector, at least for some kinds of obfuscation. –  Tener Oct 10 '11 at 11:12
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It's worth adding Telerik JustDecompile to the list of free .NET assembly decompilers, too. telerik.com/justdecompile –  Todd Oct 13 '11 at 21:12
    
@StingyJack: Great, looks like they heard you! It's now actually 10 the price at $368 if you want the VS2012 disassembler. :/ –  DeepSpace101 Feb 9 '13 at 20:13
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I dont hold it against them for making money, but ILSpy (mentioned) in @Daniel's answer is what I am using now. –  StingyJack Feb 11 '13 at 14:29
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Reflector and the File Disassembler add-in from Denis Bauer. It actually produces source projects from assemblies, where Reflector on its own only displays the disassembled source.

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Thanks, but a little late ;) –  GEOCHET Oct 7 '08 at 18:33
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Telerik JustDecompile is free and has a feature to create projects from .NET assemblies.

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You want reflector.

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Best Tool is .Net Reflector for getting source code from .Net Assembly and File Disassembler for converting .Net Assembly to Visual Studio Solution

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ILSpy is simple and helped me to do with my job... not tried reflector though!...

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protected by Raghav Sood Feb 11 '13 at 18:55

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