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In visual studio and other code editors it is possible to view the white space characters. These would appear as small ellipses in the line.

Is it possible to mimic this feature in html. I have been able to use the pre tag to display the text but I am at a loss on how to display the white space characters.

Is it possible via CSS or javascript to show the white space characters?

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3  
I would think that you would have to replace the white space character with a visible character such as a small ellipses. CSS has no character translation feature, but PHP and other languages do. –  Marc Audet Jul 31 '13 at 15:14
1  
I guess the solution would be to replace spaces with dots (i.e.) with javascript. –  Brewal Jul 31 '13 at 15:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can wrap each space in your pre elements in a span with background, so the spaces become visible, but you could copy the text as usually. Here is a JSFiddle example.

Example script (assuming there are no nested tags in the pre):

var pres = document.querySelectorAll('pre');

for (var i = 0; i < pres.length; i++) {
    pres[i].innerHTML = pres[i].innerHTML.replace(/ /g, '<span> </span>')
}

CSS:

pre > span {
    display: inline-block;
    background: radial-gradient(circle, #cc0, rgba(192,192,0,0) 2px);
}

Alternatively, you can use a custom font for pre elements, in which the whitespace characters are replaced with something visible.

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I went with this approach, as I could use the span tags to change the font for spaces. Instead of radial-gradient, I used &middot; as this is what I wanted. Thanks for pushing me in the right direction. I also, managed to use &para; for end of line indicators. –  Kami Aug 1 '13 at 14:24

you could replace whitespace chars with the ellipsis symbol, like

jsstring.replace(/[\s]/g, "\u2026");

where jsstring denotes a javascript variable with the text to alter. note that you can get and set the textual representation of an html tag including its contentby means of the jquery html() function.

in case you wish to keep line breaks, use

jsstring.replace(/[ \t]/g, "\u2026");

(example available on jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/collapsar/ARu7b/3/).

in fact, [\s] is just a shorthand for [ \t\r\n]. you may define your own character class containing exactly what you consider to be a whitespace character.

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2  
That does not preserve line breaks. See : jsfiddle.net/ARu7b/1 –  Brewal Jul 31 '13 at 15:22
    
But surely if you're using pre it makes sense to keep \ns in place. Could you edit to just have spaces? –  Ian Clark Jul 31 '13 at 15:25
    
Also, I prefer \u00B7 - the middle dot Character, as they use a similar thing on Sublime –  Ian Clark Jul 31 '13 at 15:33
    
@IanClark: sure, choose whatever replacement string suits your needs best. a sequence of center dots is easier to count than ellipses, which might be of advantages in some contexts. –  collapsar Jul 31 '13 at 15:36

It's impossible to do that by CSS but in Javascript you can do something like this. Note that I used jQuery; if you are not loading jQuery in your project let me know to change my code to plain JavaScript.

for example you have something like:

<pre>
    ul.nav-menu { list-style: none; }
    ul.nav-menu li:last-child { border: none; }
    ul.nav-menu li a { color: #b3b3b3; display: block;  }
</pre>

You can do:

<script>
    var text = $("pre").html();
    $("pre").empty()
    words = text.split(" ");
    for (i = 0; i < words.length; i++) {
        $("pre").append(words[i] + '%');
    }
</script>

And it will replace spaces with any characters like '%' or whatever.
Result will be:

ul.nav-menu%{%list-style:%none;%}
ul.nav-menu%li:last-child%{%border:%none;%}
ul.nav-menu%li%a%{%color:%#b3b3b3;%display:%block;%%}
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