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Given this dataset:

ID  type_id  Position
1   2        7
2   1        2
3   3        5
4   1        1
5   3        3
6   2        4
7   2        6
8   3        8

(There are only 3 different possible type_ids) I'd like to return a dataset with one of each type_id in groups, ordered by position.

so it would be grouped like so:

Results (ID): [4, 6, 5], [2, 7, 3], [null, 1, 8]

So the first group would consist of each of the entries type_id's with the highest (Relative) position score, the second group would have the second highest score, the third would only consist of two entries (and a null) because there are not three more of each type_id

Does this make sense? And is it possible?

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Why the mysql and postgresql tags? Confused as to why I'm suddenly seeing this burst of generic Rails and SQL questions tagged both MySQL and PostgreSQL. –  Craig Ringer Jul 31 '13 at 17:18
    
@CraigRinger well because I am using rails on postgres (for heroku of course) but I know mysql a lot better. –  johnnyPando Jul 31 '13 at 17:48
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

something like that:

with CTE as (
  select
      row_number() over (partition by type_id order by Position) as row_num,
      *
  from test
)
select array_agg(ID order by type_id)
from CTE
group by row_num

SQL FIDDLE

of, if you absolutely need nulls in your arrays:

with CTE as (
    select
        row_number() over (partition by type_id order by Position) as row_num,
        *
    from test
)
select array_agg(c.ID order by t.type_id)
from (select distinct row_num from CTE) as a
    cross join (select distinct type_id from test) as t
    left outer join CTE as c on c.row_num = a.row_num and c.type_id = t.type_id
group by a.row_num

SQL FIDDLE

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