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If I have a list containing an arbitrary number of lists, like so:

var myList = new List<List<string>>()
{
    new List<string>() { "a", "b", "c", "d" },
    new List<string>() { "1", "2", "3", "4" },
    new List<string>() { "w", "x", "y", "z" }
};

...is there any way to somehow "zip" or "rotate" the lists into something like this?

{ 
    { "a", "1", "w" },
    { "b", "2", "x" },
    { "c", "3", "y" },
    { "d", "4", "z" }
}

The obvious solution would be to do something like this:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Rotate<T>(this IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> list)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < list.Min(x => x.Count()); i++)
    {
        yield return list.Select(x => x.ElementAt(i));
    }
}

// snip

var newList = myList.Rotate();

...but I was wondering if there was a cleaner way of doing so, using linq or otherwise?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you want to solve it specifically using LINQ? –  Moo-Juice Jul 31 '13 at 17:21
    
@Moo-Juice -- good point, I edited my title. I think I just automatically assumed that the solution would use linq in some way, but I suppose that's not necessarily the case. –  Michael0x2a Jul 31 '13 at 17:29
2  
Your example code is very inefficient if the sequences are not random access. –  Eric Lippert Jul 31 '13 at 17:35
2  
I gave a general answer to another question which was more restricted which utilizes LINQ here and is a more direct answer to your question. –  Jeff Mercado Jul 31 '13 at 17:44

7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can roll your own ZipMany instance which manually iterates each of the enumerations. This will likely perform better on larger sequences than those using GroupBy after projecting each sequence:

public static IEnumerable<TResult> ZipMany<TSource, TResult>(
    IEnumerable<IEnumerable<TSource>> source,
    Func<IEnumerable<TSource>, TResult> selector)
{
   // ToList is necessary to avoid deferred execution
   var enumerators = source.Select(seq => seq.GetEnumerator()).ToList();
   try
   {
     while (true)
     {
       foreach (var e in enumerators)
       {
           bool b = e.MoveNext();
           if (!b) yield break;
       }
       // Again, ToList (or ToArray) is necessary to avoid deferred execution
       yield return selector(enumerators.Select(e => e.Current).ToList());
     }
   }
   finally
   {
       foreach (var e in enumerators) 
         e.Dispose();
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That must have taken ages to type on a phone... :) –  Moo-Juice Jul 31 '13 at 17:49
    
I went and cleaned it up for ya. I believe it captures your intent. –  Jeff Mercado Jul 31 '13 at 17:55
    
@JeffMercado Your beat me to it by literally 5 seconds. I had pretty much the same code (which I tested and it worked). I think it's a good edit. –  Simon Belanger Jul 31 '13 at 17:56
2  
Many thanks to you all. –  Eric Lippert Jul 31 '13 at 18:09
1  
@Oliver: Ah, now I understand the thrust of your question. You are absolutely right; I neglected to dispose the enumerators. I'll fix it. –  Eric Lippert Jan 24 '14 at 17:31

You can do this by using the Select extension taking a Func<T, int, TOut>:

var rotatedList = myList.Select(inner => inner.Select((s, i) => new {s, i}))
                        .SelectMany(a => a)
                        .GroupBy(a => a.i, a => a.s)
                        .Select(a => a.ToList()).ToList();

This will give you another List<List<string>>.

Breakdown

.Select(inner => inner.Select((s, i) => new {s, i}))

For each inner list, we project the list's content to a new anonymous object with two properties: s, the string value, and i the index of that value in the original list.

.SelectMany(a => a)

We flatten the result to a single list

.GroupBy(a => a.i, a => a.s)

We group by the i property of our anonymous object (recall this is the index) and select the s property as our values (the string only).

.Select(a => a.ToList()).ToList();

For each groups, we changed the enumerable to a list and another list for all the groups.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1, but I may be in the minority here in thinking the OPs original method was way more readable. –  Moo-Juice Jul 31 '13 at 17:30
    
I'm in that boat too, but still impressed –  Jonesy Jul 31 '13 at 17:31
    
@Moo-Juice I agree. And it yield better performance. I see this as an edge case where LINQ works, but is far from optimal. –  Simon Belanger Jul 31 '13 at 17:32
1  
+1 great answer. Even if it's just for the sake of the answer, as opposed to efficiency, it's a nice solution. –  keyboardP Jul 31 '13 at 17:33
1  
@SimonBelanger: I revised my comment, assuming you have a sorted order of keys, they IGrouping's will come back in that order. –  user7116 Jul 31 '13 at 17:44

How about using SelectMany and GroupBy with some indexes?

// 1. Project inner lists to a single list (SelectMany)
// 2. Use "GroupBy" to aggregate the item's based on order in the lists
// 3. Strip away any ordering key in the final answer
var query = myList.SelectMany(
    xl => xl.Select((vv,ii) => new { Idx = ii, Value = vv }))
       .GroupBy(xx => xx.Idx)
       .OrderBy(gg => gg.Key)
       .Select(gg => gg.Select(xx => xx.Value));

From LinqPad:

we groupa da items

share|improve this answer
    
+1. This is actually more in line with the method's signature used in the question (IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>>). –  Simon Belanger Jul 31 '13 at 17:39
(from count in Range(myList[0].Count)
select new List<string>(
    from count2 in Range(myList.Count)
    select myList[count2][count])
    ).ToList();

It ain't pretty, but I think it'll work.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this solution works only if there are three lists inside mylist. I was hoping more for a solution which works no matter how many lists there are. –  Michael0x2a Jul 31 '13 at 17:36
    
Okay, I think my edit makes that happen. Not 100% sure, but the basic idea is there. –  Nate Diamond Jul 31 '13 at 17:39

You can condense for loops using Range:

var result = Enumerable.Range(0, myList.Min(l => l.Count))
    .Select(i => myList.Select(l => l[i]).ToList()).ToList();
share|improve this answer

Here's an inefficient variant based on Matrix Transposition:

public static class Ext
{
    public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Rotate<T>(
        this IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> src)
    {
        var matrix = src.Select(subset => subset.ToArray()).ToArray();
        var height = matrix.Length;
        var width = matrix.Max(arr => arr.Length);

        T[][] transpose = Enumerable
            .Range(0, width)
            .Select(_ => new T[height]).ToArray();
        for(int i=0; i<height; i++)
        {        
            for(int j=0; j<width; j++)
            {            
                transpose[j][i] = matrix[i][j];            
            }
        }

        return transpose;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, readable and an extension method. –  Moo-Juice Jul 31 '13 at 17:49
    
@Moo-Juice Not horribly efficient, although it could be improved. Lots of to-arraying going on. :) –  JerKimball Jul 31 '13 at 17:51
    
+1 for mentioning its a matrix transpose –  jk. Jul 31 '13 at 21:17

Take a look at the linqlib project on codeplex, it has a rotate function that does exactly what you need.

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