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Is there any actual difference between this

public class OuterClass {
    private class InnerClass {
        public InnerClass() {}
    }
}

and this?

public class OuterClass {
    private class InnerClass {
        private InnerClass() {}
    }
}
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2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Accessing private members from another class is slightly more complicated because the JVM doesn't actually allow this. As a result the compiler injects accessor methods which makes it slightly slower or your stack trace more complicated.

For these reason I leave it as package local.

BTW The constructor of an abstract class doesn't need to be public either. It may as well be protected or package local

private static class A {
    private A() {
        throw new Error();
    }
}
public static void main(String... ignored) {
    new A();
}

prints an extra stack trace element.

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.Error
    at Main$A.<init>(Main.java:8)
    at Main$A.<init>(Main.java:6)
    at Main.main(Main.java:12)

Make the constructor package local and the second one disappears.

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Why the extra line of the stack trace is produced? How it works? I recongnized that the extra line occurs only if I define it private. For protected two lines only. So it means that defining private decreases efficiency? Why JVM compiler allows defining constructor of such classes with visibility >= protected? –  Łukasz Rzeszotarski Sep 25 '13 at 8:05
1  
@ŁukaszRzeszotarski The JVM doesn't allow private access from another class. What the javac does to work around this is to generate synthetic methods which are not private which can be called. These get a line number of the start of the class. The generated method calls the real method. It does this for all private member. While slower in the interpreted mode, once optimised the extra method is inlined and has no impact AFAIK except on JME systems where its not smart enough to do this. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 25 '13 at 13:48
    
Now it's clear. I saw the bytecode of the class and what really surprised me is that the bytecode contains additional method only if you try to instantiate the class (in the main method for instance). –  Łukasz Rzeszotarski Sep 25 '13 at 14:06
1  
@ŁukaszRzeszotarski Try incrementing ++ or += n a private field in another class and it should generate one method. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Sep 25 '13 at 14:12
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As far as other classes are concerned, it shouldn't since the inner class is declared as private. They can't see it at all.

It shouldn't make a difference to the enclosing class since it contains the inner class.

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2  
Just to note, if your class constructor is marked as private, some tool for coding standard verification like checkstyle can suggest to mark the class as final as well. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jul 31 '13 at 17:41
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