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I have a piping scheme using subprocess where one process p2 takes the output of another process p1 as input:

p1 = subprocess.Popen("ls -al", shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)
p2 = subprocess.Popen("grep mytext - ", shell=True, stdin=p1.stdout, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
result = p2.communicate()

p1 or p2 could fail for various reasons, like wrong inputs or malformed commands.

This code works fine when p1 does not fail. How can I do this but also check whether p1 specifically or p2 specifically failed? Example:

# p1 will fail since notafile does not exist
p1 = subprocess.Popen("ls notafile", shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)
p2 = subprocess.Popen("grep mytext - ", shell=True, stdin=p1.stdout, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
result = p2.communicate()

I can check p2.returncode and see that it's not 0, but that could mean that p2 failed or p1 failed. How can I specifically check whether p1 failed or p2 failed in cases where this pipe goes wrong?

I don't see how I can use p1.returncode for this which would be the ideal and obvious solution. ex:

p1 = subprocess.Popen("ls foo", shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)
p2 = subprocess.Popen("grep mytext - ", shell=True, stdin=p1.stdout, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
# here, p2.returncode not defined yet since we didn't communicate()
assert(p2 is None)
r = p2.communicate()
# now p2 has a returncode
assert(p2.returncode is not None)
# ... but p1 does not!
assert(p1.returncode is None)

so I don't see how returncode helps here?

The full solution thanks to @abarnert is something like this:

p1 = subprocess.Popen("ls -al", shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)
p2 = subprocess.Popen("grep mytext - ", shell=True, stdin=p1.stdout, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
result = p2.communicate()
if p2.returncode != 0:
  # something failed
  if p1.wait() != 0:
     # p1 failed...
  else: 
     # p2 failed...

p.s. I know the caveats of shell=True for security.

share|improve this question
    
Forget about the caveats of shell=True for security for a moment; it also makes things more complicated, because you're not actually piping ls to grep at all; you're piping one sh to another sh. Is there a reason you're doing that? –  abarnert Jul 31 '13 at 20:31
    
in my application ls and grep are more interesting command line programs (which use shell features in file input etc so need shell=True). what's wrong with the above way of doing it? i'm piping the output of ls from shell to grep, which achieves the right result of grepping the output of ls –  user248237dfsf Jul 31 '13 at 20:33
    
Also, result doesn't have a returncode; it's p1 and p2 that do. –  abarnert Jul 31 '13 at 20:34
    
@abarnet: yes that was typo, fixed –  user248237dfsf Jul 31 '13 at 20:36
2  
A couple of problems remain. (1) call p1.wait() even if p2 succeeds because that clears the zombie process from the process table. (2) if p1 writes too much to stderr, it will hang because you aren't reading it. Look at the Popen.communicate code and see how it creates theads to read pipes and do that yourself for p1.stderr. –  tdelaney Jul 31 '13 at 21:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I can check result.returncode and see that it's not 0, but that could mean that p2 fail.

No, you can't; result is just a tuple (stdoutdata, stderrdata).

It's the Popen objects that have returncode values.

And that's your answer here:

How can I specifically check whether p1 failed or p2 failed in cases where this pipe goes wrong?

Just check p1.returncode.

However, be aware that while p2.communicate does guarantee that p2 has been waited on, it does not guarantee the same for p1. Fortunately, it should guarantee that p1 is at least waitable, it not waited, so:

if p2.returncode:
    if p1.wait():
        # p2 failed, probably because p1 failed
    else:
        # p2 failed for some other reason

Except that you almost definitely want to do a p1.stdout.close() right before the communicate. Otherwise, it's possible for an error in process 2 to leave process 1 blocked, and therefore your p1.wait() could block forever. (You could work around that by using p1.poll() here and then killing it if it's not finished, but really, it's better to not create the problem than to work round it.)

One last thing: You've set p1.stderr to subprocess.PIPE, which never gets attached to anything, so it's also possible for process 1 to block trying to write to an overflowing stderr pipe. You may want to fix that as well.

share|improve this answer
    
returncode checking would be the ideal solution but I don't see how it would work, I edited my answer to reflect the problem. any thoughts? maybe I misunderstood your answer –  user248237dfsf Jul 31 '13 at 20:43
    
@user248237dfsf: My answer already explains that. Did you actually try the code using p1.wait()? –  abarnert Jul 31 '13 at 20:45
    
@abarnet: I don't understand still sorry -- if I use wait(), I get the same result. I setup p1,p2 and then do: p2.wait() which makes p1.returncode be None rather than a return code value –  user248237dfsf Jul 31 '13 at 20:47
1  
@user248237dfsf: Why would you expect p2.wait() to do anything? Process 2 has already been waited by communicate, and you already have its return code. It's process 1 that may not have been reaped. Which is why I wrote p1.wait() in both the answer and the comment. –  abarnert Jul 31 '13 at 20:50
3  
@user248237dfsf: When creating p1 you have stderr=subprocess.PIPE. That creates a new pipe (different from the one created for stdout=subprocess.PIPE). Someone or something must read the stderr data at some point if the pipe "fills up". If no one reads it, you can throw away the data but only as long as the pipe did not fill up completely. You probably want to not set p1's stderr at all, or possibly, send it through the stdout pipe (a la foo 2>&1 | bar in sh). To do the latter, use stderr=subprocess.STDOUT. –  torek Jul 31 '13 at 21:09

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