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I have the following Delete Action method, which mainly perform two separate tasks:-

  1. Delete a record from a Third party application using API call.
  2. Delete a record from the database on our own system using entity framework.

My action method looks as follow:-

[HttpPost, ActionName("Delete")]
public ActionResult DeleteConfirmed(int id)
{
    var message = "";
    var status = "";
    var tag = "";
    Resource resource = new Resource();
    try
    {
        Rack rack = repository.FindRack(id);
        tag = rack.Technology.Tag;
         resource = repository.GetResource(rack.Technology.IT360ID.Value);
    }
    catch (NullReferenceException)
    {
        return Json(new
        {
            IsSuccess = "False"
        }, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
    }
    catch (DbUpdateException)
    {
        return Json(new
        {
            IsSuccess = "AlreadyUsed"
        }, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
    }

    using(var client = new WebClient())
    {
        var query = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(string.Empty);
         query["username"] = "testuser";
        query["assetType"] = resource.ComponentDefinition.ComponentType.COMPONENTTYPENAME;
        query["operation"] = "DeleteAsset";
        query["assetName"] = resource.RESOURCENAME;
        var url = new UriBuilder("http://win-spdev:8400/servlets/AssetServlet");
        url.Query = query.ToString();
        try
        {
            string xml = client.DownloadString(url.ToString());
            XmlDocument doc = new XmlDocument();
            doc.LoadXml(xml);
            status = doc.SelectSingleNode("/operation/operationstatus").InnerText;
            message = doc.SelectSingleNode("/operation/message").InnerText;
        }
        catch (WebException ex)
        {}
    }

    if (status.ToUpper() == "SUCCESS")
    {
        try
        {
            repository.DeleteRack(id, User.Identity.Name);
            repository.Save();
             return Json(new
            {
                IsSuccess = "True", id = id, description = tag
            }, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
        }
        catch (NullReferenceException)
        {
            return Json(new
            {
                IsSuccess = "False"
            }, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
        }
        catch (DbUpdateException)
        {
            return Json(new
            {
                IsSuccess = "AlreadyUsed"
            }, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
        }
    }
     return RedirectToAction("Delete", new
    {
        id = id
    });
}

As since I am using the entity framework to perform the deletion and also a API call, so I ended up with separate try/catch blocks . so does my action method logic consider a poor design since I am having multiple try/catch blocks inside the same action method? And what better approach I can follow?

share|improve this question
    
You should call a service method from your controller's action method instead. Structure your application :-) –  D.R. Jul 31 '13 at 20:48
    
Don't put try catch blocks inside the controller, this kind of logic should be in other application tier –  Daniele Jul 31 '13 at 20:50
    
@Daniele but where i should write the try/catch logic ? all the samples at Microsoft website uses try/catch inside the action methods . –  Asp.netmvc Asp.netmvc Jul 31 '13 at 21:28
    
@D.R. i did not understand your point. the above code is an action method. and which service method you are talking about ? –  Asp.netmvc Asp.netmvc Jul 31 '13 at 21:29
    
at least refactor to several methods Use the SRP rule google.com.au/… –  phil soady Jul 31 '13 at 22:44

3 Answers 3

Separate error cases are certainly not a bad pracice.

What is bad practice, though, is catching unspecific errors. You are returning "AlreadyUsed" for all DbUpdateExceptions. There might be other causes for this than the one you planned for. If that happens you swallow the error and have a silent bug. You might lack the imagination right now what those cases might be but that is just because you never know bugs before they happen. I advise that you catch even more specific than this by either interpreting the exception object (maybe interpret the message, god forbid) or by tightening the region that the catch covers to exactly the statement that can give the error.

In short, don't swallow exceptions indicating bugs. Bugs happen all the time, you want to know about them and fix them.

Also, for the same reason, never ever catch NullReferenceException. They are always bugs by convention. Insert an if already do deal with the null.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the reply, but can you explain why i should not catch a NullReferenceException? –  Asp.netmvc Asp.netmvc Jul 31 '13 at 21:12
1  
Because almost always it is a bug. You don't want to hide bugs. There might be multiple possible places where a nullreferenceexception can occur. You think you are "fixing" one of them but you suppress all. That hides bugs. Just use an if to test for the condition you want to check. –  usr Jul 31 '13 at 21:20

If the code in the try-catch is a "logical-entity", e.g. does an independent functionality that wouldnt affect the remaining code, or it wouldnt cause incorrect logic (incorrect execution) to the following code if it had an error. Then Why not.

But if it would break your program logic then it should be stopped and the error should be handled (scope of your try-catch block. it all depends on your program logic.

share|improve this answer

There is nothing wrong with limiting the try-catch scope(s) to as little as you possibly know.
(I might get flamed for this.)

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