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I have two arrays:

  1. @array1 contains blah1 through blah100.
  2. @array2 contains Name: creating "blah1" through Name: creating "blah100".

I need to check that each element from @array1 is in @array2 but the Name: creating part is getting in the way.

What is the best route to make sure that all elements from @array1 are in @array2?

Maybe the use of regexes for matching while looping through @array1 against @array2?
Is there another faster way?

Do array_diff, intersect, or unique work when there is a noisy string in one of the arrays?

OR

maybe manipulate @array2 so that it gets rid of Name: creating part for each data?

Which way would be faster?

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Do you have any control over creating of these arrays? Or you get them from somewhere. –  user4035 Jul 31 '13 at 21:13
    
What result do you want? Is a boolean meaning "matches" or "not matching" enough, or what else is wanted? –  AdrianHHH Jul 31 '13 at 21:17
    
no control on the creation of those arrays. @user4035 –  ealeon Jul 31 '13 at 21:17
    
@AdrainHHH Boolean of "all" (not just a few) of the array1 data is in array2 –  ealeon Jul 31 '13 at 21:19
    
@ealeon Unfurtunately, there is no other way, then comparing them element by element, using a regexp. And checking, that their lengths are equal. –  user4035 Jul 31 '13 at 21:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
die if @array1 != @array2;
for (0..$#array1) {
   die if $array2[$_] ne qq{Name: creating "$array1[$_]"};
}

or if the Name part is variable,

die if @array1 != @array2;
for (0..$#array1) {
   die if $array2[$_] !~ /: creating "\Q$array1[$_]\E"$/;
}
share|improve this answer
    
If they are sorted. Otherwise can just sort them. –  Qtax Jul 31 '13 at 21:30
1  
@Joseph Myers, The OP didn't specify what he wants done, but 1) he did imply it's an error if they are different. ("What is the best route to make sure that all elements ...", emphasis mine), and 2) it's very easy to identify what needs to be changed if it needs to be changed (e.g. s/die/return 0/). –  ikegami Jul 31 '13 at 21:43
1  
@Joseph Myers, Re " If I wanted to use it in a program [...], I would have to rewrite it first." I wrote it for the OP, not you. As I already explained, your changes would not meet the OP's stated requirements. If you have different requirements than the OP and you need some help adapting the code, let me know. –  ikegami Jul 31 '13 at 23:29
2  
@Joseph Myers, Adapted to ignore the "Name" part. –  ikegami Jul 31 '13 at 23:30
1  
@ikegami And thank you, but no, I don't need any help with this. I've been a perl hacker and package writer for ~15 years, expert in almost all versions of it, even MacPerl for Mac OS 8. I am trying to be helpful to the community, which includes people who can't understand how to adapt your code with die into logic that works within their program. (And I suspect with about 100% certainty that Name is no more a literal value than blah1 & blah2.) –  Joseph Myers Jul 31 '13 at 23:47

I'd use map to filter the needed parts from the second array and then compare the two with the smart matching operator (~~):

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @arr1 = qw(blah1 blah2 blah3);
my @arr2 = ('Name: creating "blah1"','Name: creating "blah2"','Name: creating "blah3"');

my @compare = map { local $_ = $_; s/^.+\: creating "([a-zA-Z0-9]+)"/$1/; $_ } @arr2;

if (@arr1 ~~ @compare){
    print "all blahs there\n";
}

In this example its assumed both arrays are sorted already, if not just use "sort".

share|improve this answer
    
what a neat trick! im still debating whether to go with this route because this would pass if arr2 "just contains" arr1 ie arr2 can have whats in arr1 AND more. –  ealeon Aug 1 '13 at 4:02
    
What's local $_ = $_; for? I don't think it's necessary –  doubleDown Aug 1 '13 at 4:09
    
The local $_ = $_; is necessary because I didnt want to change @arr2! –  marderh Aug 1 '13 at 5:12
    
It's described in detail here: Using regex in Map function –  marderh Aug 1 '13 at 8:05

Example Data

my @array1 = qw(blah1 blah2);
my @array2 = split(';', 'Joe: creating "blah1";Bill: creating "blah2"');

The first two lines following are a solution to your problem

my @check = map { m/:.*?"(.*)"/g } @array2;
if (@array1 == @array2 && "@array1" eq "@check") {
    # note that @array1 == @array2 is only done for efficiency;
    # it would be sufficient to verify only that
    # "@array1" eq "@check"
    print "same\n";
} else {
    print "different\n";
}

Note that it would now be safe to sort @array1 and @check in case your original arrays were not in corresponding order. (Sorting @array and @array2 would only be likely to destroy any order that might have already been there because of the names prefixing the values in @array2.)

my @check = map { m/:.*?"(.*)"/g } @array2;
my $i = 0;
if (@array1 == @array2) {
    for (; $i < @array1; $i++) {
        last if $array1[$i] ne $check[$i];
    }
} else {
    $i = -1;
}
if ($i == @array1) {
    print "same\n";
} else {
    print "different\n";
}

Please note that this longer code is only more efficient if your arrays are not identical. If it is usually the case that you expect your arrays' values to be the same, then there is no benefit in using the longer code.

BTW: That regular expression looks careless, but according to the OP it is exactly what we want, especially if blah1, blah2, etc., may contain additional double quotes. If we are sure that no names contain quotes, then we can remove the :.*? and just do "(.\*)" alone, which would be faster.

share|improve this answer
    
My first suggested solution always works. For my second solution, you are somewhat correct. I correctly compare the length of both arrays in scalar context and correctly compare a sufficient number of elements to determine if they are not identical. However, the shortcut of only comparing $i to @array1 assumes there is data in @array1. I will update to handle the case of @array1 == 0. Note that the OP said "@array1 has data" so in fact, both of my solutions are correct. ;) –  Joseph Myers Aug 1 '13 at 0:02

I would sort both arrays with the same rule and then compare one by one.

use strict;
use warnings;

sub checkall{
my @array1 = @{shift};
my @array2 = @{shift};

my @sorted1 = sort{ $a <=> $b } @array1;
my @sorted2 = sort{ $a <=> $b } @array2;

if( $#sorted1 == $#sorted2){
  for(0 .. $#sorted1)
  {
    #print $sorted1[$_] ."->". $sorted2[$_] ."\n"; #uncomment to see the comparison
    return "doesn't match!" if not $sorted1[$_] eq $sorted2[$_];
  }
  return "ok!";
}else
  {
    return "not same size!";
  }
}

my @array1 = (4,2,3,1);
my @array2 = (1,2,3,4);
print checkall(\@array1,\@array2);

Another version closer to the question requirements:

sub checkall{
    my @array1 = @{shift};
    my @array2 = @{shift};
    my $aux;

    my @sorted1 = sort ( map{ ($aux) = $_ =~ /Name\: creating \"(.*)\"/g } @array1 );
    my @sorted2 = sort @array2;

    if( $#sorted1 == $#sorted2){
      for(0 .. $#sorted1)
      {
        #print $sorted1[$_] ."->". $sorted2[$_] ."\n"; #uncomment to see the comparison
        return "doesn't match!" if not $sorted1[$_] eq $sorted2[$_];
      }
      return "ok!";
    }else
      {
        return "not same size!";
      }
    }

The difference is in the creation of a new list with a map and a pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
It's an example, just put your own sorting rules and comparisons. –  alfa64 Jul 31 '13 at 23:36

This should be fastest but only by very little margin compared to ikegami's solution

die if @array1 != @array2;
my $i;
for my $e (@array1) {
   die if $array2[$i++] ne qq{Name: creating "$e"};
}

Edit:

If Name part of string is variable:

die if @array1 != @array2;
my $i;
for my $e (@array1) {
   die if $array2[$i++] !~ m/: creating "\Q$e\E"/;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please note that "Name" cannot be assumed to be a literal value any more than "blah1" and "blah2." Solutions assuming otherwise are almost certainly wrong. –  Joseph Myers Jul 31 '13 at 23:49

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