Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for an easy way to convert a simple binary file into a text-representation of its binary, where encoding doesn't matter. I know that the programmatic solution is straightforward, but I feel that there must be some arcane string of unix commands to accomplish this.

Am I off base? Is there a simpler solution than the programmatic?

share|improve this question
add comment

8 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

for example, to display a binary file as a sequence of hex codes:

od -t x1 file|cut -c8-
share|improve this answer
add comment
base64 -e filename>xxx

on the other side

base64 -d xxx>filename
share|improve this answer
    
Yep. Stefan, assuming you want to be able to reverse this conversion, you want base64 or uuencode, which were actually designed for this task. –  Jason Orendorff Nov 25 '09 at 17:42
add comment

Use od. For example:

$ od -t x1 -An /bin/ls | head
 7f 45 4c 46 02 01 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
 02 00 3e 00 01 00 00 00 e0 26 40 00 00 00 00 00
 40 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 30 b6 01 00 00 00 00 00
 00 00 00 00 40 00 38 00 09 00 40 00 1d 00 1c 00
 06 00 00 00 05 00 00 00 40 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
 40 00 40 00 00 00 00 00 40 00 40 00 00 00 00 00
 f8 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 f8 01 00 00 00 00 00 00
 08 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 03 00 00 00 04 00 00 00
 38 02 00 00 00 00 00 00 38 02 40 00 00 00 00 00
 38 02 40 00 00 00 00 00 1c 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
share|improve this answer
    
Is there any way to get rid of that address location output? I'm reading through man od now. –  Stefan Kendall Nov 25 '09 at 16:30
    
Yes! You can use cut as in catwalk's answer or use the -A option to od. –  Greg Bacon Nov 25 '09 at 16:35
add comment

uuencode and uudecode were made for transferring binary content as ASCII characters. See the wikipedia entry.

share|improve this answer
add comment
max@upsight:~$ openssl base64 < /dev/urandom | head -10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...and so on

share|improve this answer
add comment

If the reason you're doing it is to see strings inside the binary data then there's a command called "strings" that will print all the strings in a file for you.

share|improve this answer
    
I was just about to comment on this exact subject. Good thing I read the previous answers first. –  Powerlord Nov 25 '09 at 16:50
    
Nope, not my purpose. –  Stefan Kendall Nov 25 '09 at 17:35
add comment

you can also use hexdump. Look at the man page for more options

$ hexdump binaryfile
share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes, you are off-base, this is nontrivial in the general case. Some commercial solutions exist, one we use is Autonomy Keyview.

I am assuming you mean including (e.g.) MSOffice and PDFs.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.