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In my WindowsCE / Compact Framework (.NET1.1) project, I need to create a new table in code. I thought I could do it this way:

if (! TableExists("table42"))
{
    CreateTable42();
}

public static bool TableExists(string tableName)
{
    try
    {
        using (SqlCeConnection sqlConn = new SqlCeConnection(@"Data Source=\my documents\Platypus.SDF"))
        {
            sqlConn.Open();
            string qryStr = "SELECT COUNT(*) FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES WHERE TABLE_NAME = ?";
            SqlCeCommand cmd = new SqlCeCommand(qryStr, sqlConn);
            cmd.Parameters[0].Value = tableName;
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
            int retCount = (int)cmd.ExecuteScalar();
            return retCount > 0;
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("TableExists ex.Message == " + ex.Message);
        MessageBox.Show("TableExists ex.ToString() == " + ex.ToString());
        MessageBox.Show("TableExists ex.GetBaseException() == " + ex.GetBaseException());
        return false;
    }
}

...but the call to TableExists() fails; and shows me:

TableExists ex.Message ==
TableExists ex.ToString() == System.Data.SqlServerCe.SqlCeException at System.Data.SqlServerCe.SqlConnection.ProcessResults(Int32 hr) at ...at Open(boolean silent) ...
TableExists ex.GetBaseException() == [same as ex.ToString() above]

"Int32 hr" ... ??? What the Hec Ramsey is that?

As documented previously in these environs, I can't step through this projct, so I rely on those calls to MessageBox.Show().

The rest of the related code, if it may be of interest, is:

public static void CreateTable42()
{
    try
    {
        using (SqlCeConnection con = new SqlCeConnection(@"Data Source=\my documents\Platypus.SDF"))
        {
            con.Open();
            using (SqlCeCommand com =  new SqlCeCommand(


"create table table42 (setting_id INT IDENTITY NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,  setting_name varchar(40) not null, setting_value(63) varchar not null)", con))
                {
                    com.ExecuteNonQuery();
                    WriteSettingsVal("table42settingname","table42settingval");
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("CreateTable42 " + ex.Message);
        }
    }

public static void WriteSettingsVal(string settingName, string settingVal)
{
    using (SqlCeConnection sqlConn = new SqlCeConnection(@"Data Source=\my documents\Platypus.SDF"))
    {
        sqlConn.Open();
        string dmlStr = "insert into tabld42 (setting_name, setting_value) values(?, ?)";
        SqlCeCommand cmd = new SqlCeCommand(dmlStr, sqlConn);
        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text; 
        cmd.Parameters[0].Value = settingName;
        cmd.Parameters[1].Value = settingVal;
        try
        {
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("WriteSettingsVal " + ex.Message);
        }
    }
}

UPDATE

Answer to Brad Rem's comment:

I don't think it's necessary to encase the param in quotes, as other working code is like:

cmd.Parameters.Add("@account_id", Dept.AccountID);

-and:

cmd.Parameters[0].Value = Dept.AccountID;

(it does it one way the first time when in a loop, and the other way thereafter (don't ask me why).

Anyway, just for grins, I did change the TableExists() parameter code from this:

cmd.Parameters[0].Value = tableName;

...to this:

cmd.Parameters.Add("@TABLE_NAME", tableName);

...but I still get the exact same result.

UPDATE 2

Here (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa237891(v=SQL.80).aspx) I found this: "Caution You must specify the SQL Server CE provider string when you open a SQL Server CE database."

They give this example:

cn.ConnectionString = "Provider=Microsoft.SQLSERVER.OLEDB.CE.2.0; data source=\Northwind.sdf"

I'm not doing that; my conn str is:

using (SqlCeConnection sqlConn = new SqlCeConnection(@"Data Source=\my documents\CCRDB.SDF"))

Could that be my problem?

UPDATE 3

I took this gent's advice (http://www.codeproject.com/Answers/629613/Why-is-my-SQLServer-CE-code-failing?cmt=487657#answer1) and added a catch for SqlCeExcpetions so that it is now:

public static bool TableExists(string tableName)
{
    try
    {
        using (SqlCeConnection sqlConn = new SqlCeConnection(@"Data Source=\my documents\CCRDB.SDF"))
        {
            sqlConn.Open();
            string qryStr = "SELECT COUNT(*) FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES WHERE TABLE_NAME = @TABLE_NAME";
            SqlCeCommand cmd = new SqlCeCommand(qryStr, sqlConn);
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@TABLE_NAME", tableName);
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
            int retCount = (int)cmd.ExecuteScalar();
            return retCount > 0;
        }
    }
    catch (SqlCeException sqlceex)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("TableExists sqlceex.Message == " + sqlceex.Message);
        MessageBox.Show("TableExists sqlceex.ToString() == " + sqlceex.ToString());
        return false;
        . . .

The SqlCeException message is: "There is a file sharing violation. A different process might be using the file [,,,,,]" then "...processresults ... open ... getinstance ..."

UPDATE 4

Trying to use ctacke's sample code, but: Is Transaction absolutely necessary? I had to change the code to the following for my scenario/milieu, and don't know what Transaction should be or how to build it:

public static bool TableExists(string tableName)
{
    string sql = string.Format("SELECT COUNT(*) FROM information_schema.tables WHERE table_name = '{0}'", tableName);
    try
    {
        using (SqlCeConnection sqlConn = new SqlCeConnection(@"Data Source=\my documents\HHSDB.SDF"))
        {
            SqlCeCommand command = new SqlCeCommand(sql, sqlConn);
            //command.Transaction = CurrentTransaction as SqlCeTransaction;
            command.Connection = sqlConn;
            command.CommandText = sql;
            int count = Convert.ToInt32(command.ExecuteScalar());
            return (count > 0);
        }
    }
    catch (SqlCeException sqlceex)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("TableExists sqlceex.Message == " + sqlceex.Message);
        return false;
    }
}

UPDATE 5

With this code, the err msg I get is, "An err msg is available for this exception but cannot be displayed because these messages are optional and are not currently insallted on this device. Please install ... NETCFv35.Messages.EN.cab"

UPDATE 6

All too typically, this legacy, ancient-technology project is giving me headaches. It seems that only one connection is allowed to be open at a time, and the app opens one from the outset; so, I have to use that connection. However, it is a DBConnection, not a SqlCeConnection, so I can't use this code:

using (SqlCeCommand com =  new SqlCeCommand(
       "create table hhs_settings (setting_id int identity (1,1) Primary key,  setting_name varchar(40) not null, setting_value(63) varchar not null)", frmCentral.dbconn))
{
    com.ExecuteNonQuery();
    WriteSettingsVal("beltprinter", "ZebraQL220");
}

...because the already-open connection type passed as an arg to the SqlCeCommand constructor is DBCommand, not the expected/required SqlCeConneection.

The tentacles of this code are far too wide and entrenched to rip out by the roots and refactor to make it more sensible: a single tentative step in the foothills causes a raging avalanche on Everest.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried surrounding your parameter with single quotes? Or, according to the documentation, it still looks like you need to call Parameters.Add and 'Prepare'. –  Brad Rem Jul 31 '13 at 23:41
    
For UPDATE 5: stackoverflow.com/q/12282697/153923 –  jp2code Aug 1 '13 at 17:43
    
@Brad Rem: I feel like surrounding my perimeter with a Rube Goldberg filter (the code I'm dealing with often reminds me of a Kafkaesque Rube Goldberg contraption). –  B. Clay Shannon Aug 1 '13 at 18:14
    
A SqlCeConnection inherits from a DbConnection so simply cast it back to the SqlCeConnection (or use frmCentral.dbconn as SqlCeConnection) –  ctacke Aug 1 '13 at 22:01
    
I tried that, but actually the reason why it didn't work is this DBConnection is a home-grown animal (object) that creates a connection, etc. So, I'm having to use our internal API to do this...it's not pretty... –  B. Clay Shannon Aug 1 '13 at 22:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For fun I'd try two things. First, replace the '?' parameter with a named parameter like '@tablename' and see if that changes things. Yes, I know '?' should work, but it's a confusing, ugly precedent and maybe since it's a system table it's wonky. Yes, it's a stretch, but worth a try just to know.

The second thing I'd do is something like this method from the SQLCE implementation of the OpenNETCF ORM:

    public override bool TableExists(string tableName)
    {
        var connection = GetConnection(true);
        try
        {
            using (var command = GetNewCommandObject())
            {
                command.Transaction = CurrentTransaction as SqlCeTransaction;
                command.Connection = connection;
                var sql = string.Format("SELECT COUNT(*) FROM information_schema.tables WHERE table_name = '{0}'", tableName);
                command.CommandText = sql;
                var count = Convert.ToInt32(command.ExecuteScalar());

                return (count > 0);
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            DoneWithConnection(connection, true);
        }
    }

Note that I didn't even bother parameterizing, largely because I doubt it will provide any perf benefit (queue the hordes whining about SQL injection). This way definitely works - we've got it deployed and in use in many live solutions.

EDIT

For completeness (though I'm not sure it adds to clarity).

    protected virtual IDbConnection GetConnection(bool maintenance)
    {
        switch (ConnectionBehavior)
        {
            case ConnectionBehavior.AlwaysNew:
                var connection = GetNewConnectionObject();
                connection.Open();
                return connection;
            case ConnectionBehavior.HoldMaintenance:
                if (m_connection == null)
                {
                    m_connection = GetNewConnectionObject();
                    m_connection.Open();
                }
                if (maintenance) return m_connection;
                var connection2 = GetNewConnectionObject();
                connection2.Open();
                return connection2;
            case ConnectionBehavior.Persistent:
                if (m_connection == null)
                {
                    m_connection = GetNewConnectionObject();
                    m_connection.Open();
                }
                return m_connection;
            default:
                throw new NotSupportedException();
        }
    }

    protected virtual void DoneWithConnection(IDbConnection connection, bool maintenance)
    {
        switch (ConnectionBehavior)
        {
            case ConnectionBehavior.AlwaysNew:
                connection.Close();
                connection.Dispose();
                break;
            case ConnectionBehavior.HoldMaintenance:
                if (maintenance) return;
                connection.Close();
                connection.Dispose();
                break;
            case ConnectionBehavior.Persistent:
                return;
            default:
                throw new NotSupportedException();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Have you got the "GetConnection()" and "DoneWithConnection()" code handy? –  B. Clay Shannon Aug 1 '13 at 15:51
    
Updates 4 and 5 specifically relate to this code. –  B. Clay Shannon Aug 1 '13 at 16:34
    
Use object o = command.ExecuteScalar(); then if ((o != null) && (o != DBNull.Value)) { var count = Convert.ToInt32(o); ... } else return false; –  jp2code Aug 1 '13 at 17:46
    
Bleh! Is that readable? –  jp2code Aug 1 '13 at 17:47
    
@jp2code: Readable enough, but my problem - at least at present - is the file sharing violation. –  B. Clay Shannon Aug 1 '13 at 18:16

wow... still struggling... I did too when I first got started on a handheld device SQL-CE. My current project is running with C#.Net 3.5 but I think the principles you are running into are the same. Here is what is working for my system in it's close parallels to yours.

First, the connection string to the handheld. It is just

string myConnString  = @"Data Source=\MyFolder\MyData.sdf";

no reference to the sql driver

Next, the TableExists

SqlCeCommand oCmd = new SqlCeCommand( "select * from INFORMATION_SCHEME.TABLES "
   + " where TABLE_NAME = @pTableName" );
oCmd.Parameters.Add( new SqlCeParameter( "pTableName", YourTableParameterToFunction ));

The "@pTableName" is to differentiate between the "TABLE_NAME" column and to absolutely prevent any issues about ambiguity. The Parameter does NOT get the extra "@". In SQL, the @ indicates to look for a variable... The SqlCeParameter of "pTableName" must match as it is in the SQL Command (but without the leading "@").

Instead of issuing a call to ExecuteScalar, I am actually pulling the data down into a DataTable via

DataTable oTmpTbl = new DataTable();
SqlCeDataAdapter da = new SqlCeDataAdapter( oCmd );
da.Fill( oTmpTbl );
bool tblExists = oTbl.Rows.Count > 0;

This way, I either get records back or I dont... if I do, the number of records should be > 0. Since I'm not doing a "LIKE", it should only return the one in question.

When you get into your insert, updates and deletes, I have always tried to prefix my parameters with something like "@pWhateverColumn" and make sure the SqlCeParameter is by the same name but without the "@". I haven't had any issues and this project has been running for years. Yes it's a .net 3.5 app, but the fundamental basics of connecting and querying SHOULD be the same.

If it IS all within your application, I would try something like creating a single global static "Connection" object. Then, a single static method to handle it. Then, instead of doing a NEW connection during every "using" attempt, change it to something like...

public static class ConnectionHandler
{
   static SqlCeConnection myGlobalConnection;

   public static SqlCeConnection GetConnection()
   {
      if( myGlobalConnection == null )
         myGlobalConnection = new SqlCeConnection();

      return myGlobalConnection;
   }

   public static bool SqlConnect()
   {
      GetConnection();   // just to ensure object is created

      if( myGlobalConnection.State != System.Data.ConnectionState.Open)
      {
         try
         {
            myGlobalConnection.ConnectionString = @"Data Source=\MyFolder\MyDatabase.sdf";
            myGlobalConnection.Open();
         }
         catch( Exception ex)
         {
            // optionally messagebox, or preserve the connection error to the user
         }
      }

      if( myGlobalConnection.State != System.Data.ConnectionState.Open )
         MessageBox.Show( "notify user");

      // return if it IS successful at opening the connection (or was already open)
      return myGlobalConnection.State == System.Data.ConnectionState.Open;
   }

   public static void SqlDisconnect()
   {
      if (myGlobalConnection!= null)
      {
         if (myGlobalConnection.State == ConnectionState.Open)
            myGlobalConnection.Close();

         // In case some "other" state, always try to force CLOSE
         // such as Connecting, Broken, Fetching, etc...
         try
         { myGlobalConnection.Close(); }
         catch
         { // notify user if issue}
      }
   }
}

... in your other class / function...

   if( ConnectionHandler.SqlConnect() )
      Using( SqlCeConnection conn = ConnectionHandler.GetConnection )
      {
         // do your stuff
      }

... finally, when your app is finished, or any other time you need to...

ConnectionHandler.SqlDisconnect();

This keeps things centralized, and you don't have to worry about open/close, what the connection string is buried all over the place, etc... If you can't connect, you can't run a query, don't try to run the query if it can't even get that far.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks; I'll implement your suggestions and report back. I'm fearful, though (shaking in my proverbial boots (!)), that only one connection is allowed at a time and that the app gets one at the start and holds on to it like a rabid pitbull. –  B. Clay Shannon Aug 1 '13 at 17:41
    
Yes: I get the following SQL Server CE Exception communique: "There is a file sharing violation. A different process might be using the file [,,,,,,]" –  B. Clay Shannon Aug 1 '13 at 17:53
    
@ClayShannon, Have you tried a hard boot of the device to kill any other tasks that MAY have it opened? And try again. Or... go to the system configuration, check what processes are running and kill them if you can (unless something else has a hold on it). –  DRapp Aug 1 '13 at 17:56
    
I'll look at that, but I think it really is that the code is the culprit (it's very "cleverly" designed - every wheel reinvented, no standards consulted, no conventions respected). –  B. Clay Shannon Aug 1 '13 at 17:59
    
@ClayShannon, check revised answer for option to help via a static class connection handler. –  DRapp Aug 1 '13 at 18:37

I think it may be a permission issue on INFORMATION_SCHEMA system views. Try the following.

GRANT VIEW DEFINITION TO your_user;

See here for more details

share|improve this answer
    
It's SQLCE, not SQL Server –  pdriegen Aug 1 '13 at 14:31
    
@pdriegen Does this not apply to SQL Server CE? –  David Nhim Aug 1 '13 at 15:07
1  
SQLCE isn't a "server" per-se. It's an in-process db engine that has no concept of users and permissions. So - no it unfortunately doesn't apply. –  pdriegen Aug 2 '13 at 15:19
    
Ah, ok. Good to know. Thanks for responding. –  David Nhim Aug 2 '13 at 16:33

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