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I have object Reports and ReportSubscriber and I want to count number of subscribers of a Report.

One solution is annotating. I have lots of reports so annotating all of them takes ~6 seconds, so I thought maybe it's better to annotate after paginating:

filter_search = ReportFilter(request.GET, queryset=Report.objects.filter(
        created_at__gt=start_date,
        created_at__lte=end_date,
        is_confirmed__exact=True,
    ).annotate(sub_count=Count("reportsubscriber")).order_by('-sub_count'))

paginator = Paginator(filter_search, 20)

result = paginator.page(1).object_list.annotate(
                sub_count=Count("reportsubscriber"))

It worked, but it took the same time and when I checked queries, it actually still went through all rows in report_subscriber table. So I tried using .extra()

filter_search = ReportFilter(request.GET, queryset=Report.objects.filter(
            created_at__gt=start_date,
            created_at__lte=end_date,
            is_confirmed__exact=True,
        ))

paginator = Paginator(filter_search, 20)
paged_reports = paginator.page(1)

result = filter_search.qs.extra(
            select={
                'sub_count': 'SELECT COUNT(*) FROM reports LEFT OUTER JOIN report_subscribers  \
                             ON (reports.id = report_subscribers.id) \
                             WHERE reports.id = report_subscribers.id \
                             AND report_subscribers.report_id IN %s \
                            ' % "(%s)" % ",".join([str(r.id) for r in paged_reports.object_list])
            },
            order_by=['sub_count']
        )

But this still didn't worked. I got one static number of subscribers for all reports. What am I missing, and maybe there are better ways to accomplish this? Thanks

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3 Answers 3

I can't give you a definitive answer, I believe your problem is that even when paginated, your entire query must be executed so that the paginator knows how many pages there are. I should think you'll be better off getting rid of the annotation before pagination:

filter_search = ReportFilter(request.GET, queryset=Report.objects.filter(
        created_at__gt=start_date,
        created_at__lte=end_date,
        is_confirmed__exact=True,
    ).order_by('-sub_count'))

paginator = Paginator(filter_search, 20)

result = paginator.page(1).object_list.annotate(
                sub_count=Count("reportsubscriber"))

I trust from your example that object_list is a queryset that you can annotate, but if it's just a list of objects, you can annotate each page of results with something like:

pageIds = [report.id for report in paginator.page(1).object_list]
result = Report.objects.filter(id__in=pageIds).annotate(
                sub_count=Count("reportsubscriber"))

But this is all shooting in the dark. Nothing you're doing looks too crazy, so unless your dataset is huge, I can only imagine that your problem is a poorly indexed query. You really will want to profile the actual query that's being generated. You can get the SQL by executing from your project Django shell for a given start_date and end_data:

Report.objects.filter(
        created_at__gt=start_date,
        created_at__lte=end_date,
        is_confirmed__exact=True,
    ).order_by('-sub_count').query

And then run the same query from the PSQL command line on your database using EXPLAIN. You'll have to do a bit of reading to figure out how to interpret the results.

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OK, got it. I was selecting wrong table.

So I changed .extra() and it's only COUNTing per page now:

result = filter_search.qs.extra(
            select={
                'sub_count': 'SELECT COUNT(*) FROM report_subscribers \
                             WHERE report_subscribers.report_id = reports.id\
                             AND report_subscribers.report_id IN %s \
                            ' % "(%s)" % ",".join([str(r.id) for r in paged_reports.object_list])

            }
        )

But now I can't sort by sub_count since I don't have all values. Well, perhaps there's no any other way of doing it without counting all or actually storing counts in a database

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This is how I used the Paginator with filtering and a class based view:

from django.core.paginator import Paginator, EmptyPage, InvalidPage

class BaseTemplateView(TemplateView):
    """
    Abstract View to populate NavBar context
    """
    def get_context_data(self, **kwargs):
        context = super(BaseTemplateView, self).get_context_data(**kwargs)
        context['ideas'] = Idea.objects.all()
        return context

class IdeaView(BaseTemplateView):

    template_name = 'products/idea.html'

    def get(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
        ideas = Idea.objects.all()
        idea = get_object_or_404(Idea, slug=kwargs['slug'])
        products = Product.objects.filter(ideas=idea)
        products_list = products
        paginator = Paginator(products_list, 12)
        try:
            page = int(request.GET.get('page', '1'))
        except:
            page = 1

        try:
            products = paginator.page(page)
        except(EmptyPage, InvalidPage):
            products = paginator.page(paginator.num_pages)

        return render_to_response(self.template_name,
            {'ideas': ideas, 'idea': idea, 'products': products},
            context_instance=RequestContext(request))
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