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When I try to run my code, it causes segmentation fault on malloc on 89th line with "s1 = malloc(65536);" which persist even if I change it to calloc or realloc and also it causes this to be written if I have my function to free memory on line 82 or 86:

*** glibc detected *** /home/purlox/whaat: free(): invalid next size (normal): 0x00000000017b32b0 ***
======= Backtrace: =========
/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6(+0x7eb96)[0x7ff4f61aeb96]
/home/purlox/whaat[0x400904]
/home/purlox/whaat[0x4024de]
/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xed)[0x7ff4f615176d]
/home/purlox/whaat[0x400699]
======= Memory map: ========
00400000-00404000 r-xp 00000000 00:15 524713                             /home/purlox/whaat
00603000-00604000 r--p 00003000 00:15 524713                             /home/purlox/whaat
00604000-00605000 rw-p 00004000 00:15 524713                             /home/purlox/whaat
01793000-017b4000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0                                  [heap]
7ff4f5f18000-7ff4f5f2d000 r-xp 00000000 08:05 4066792                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1
7ff4f5f2d000-7ff4f612c000 ---p 00015000 08:05 4066792                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1
7ff4f612c000-7ff4f612d000 r--p 00014000 08:05 4066792                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1
7ff4f612d000-7ff4f612e000 rw-p 00015000 08:05 4066792                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1
7ff4f6130000-7ff4f62e5000 r-xp 00000000 08:05 4067023                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.15.so
7ff4f62e5000-7ff4f64e4000 ---p 001b5000 08:05 4067023                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.15.so
7ff4f64e4000-7ff4f64e8000 r--p 001b4000 08:05 4067023                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.15.so
7ff4f64e8000-7ff4f64ea000 rw-p 001b8000 08:05 4067023                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.15.so
7ff4f64ea000-7ff4f64ef000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
7ff4f64f0000-7ff4f6512000 r-xp 00000000 08:05 4067008                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/ld-2.15.so
7ff4f6712000-7ff4f6713000 r--p 00022000 08:05 4067008                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/ld-2.15.so
7ff4f6713000-7ff4f6715000 rw-p 00023000 08:05 4067008                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/ld-2.15.so
7ff4f6715000-7ff4f671b000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
7fffa991c000-7fffa993f000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0                          [stack]
7fffa9a00000-7fffa9a01000 r-xp 00000000 00:00 0                          [vdso]
ffffffffff600000-ffffffffff601000 r-xp 00000000 00:00 0                  [vsyscall]
Aborted (core dumped)

gdb says that the "free(str->string);" caused that, but I'm not sure how. The error with allocating memory only happens on one specific place and I tried changing the size of the memory allocated to more or less than it is there now (e.g. I tried allocating only 8 bytes or I tried allocating 100 times as much as now), but it still caused the same segmentation fault.

whaat.c

#include "sstring.h"
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    char* s1,
                s2;

// 12 byte long strings
    char s3[8] = "Nequeou",
             s4[8] = "quisqua";

// 256 byte long strings
    char s5[256] = "Pellentesque venenatis rhoncus urna id tincidunt. Quisque blandit rhoncus nisi, vel facilisis odio ornare nec. Maecenas id tellus sit amet nunc auctor commodo. Proin egestas molestie malesuada. Vestibulum in lacus quis nisl ultricies cursus non ac nullam.",
             s6[256] = "Sed tristique porta lorem. Ut elementum est in magna laoreet, in lacinia ante blandit. Vestibulum condimentum sem vel ligula feugiat, vel venenatis ante placerat. Phasellus nec turpis viverra sapien vehicula sagittis vitae tincidunt lectus. Fusce posuere.";

// 65 536 byte long strings
    char s7[65536],
             s8[65536];

    s_string ss1,
                     ss2,

                     ss3,
                     ss4,

                     ss5,
                     ss6,

                     ss7,
                     ss8;

    FILE *LoremIpsum;
    int i;

    s_init(&ss3, "Nequeou ", 8);
    s_init(&ss4, "quisqua ", 8);
    s_init(&ss5, "Pellentesque venenatis rhoncus urna id tincidunt. Quisque blandit rhoncus nisi, vel facilisis odio ornare nec. Maecenas id tellus sit amet nunc auctor commodo. Proin egestas molestie malesuada. Vestibulum in lacus quis nisl ultricies cursus non ac nullam. ", 256);
    s_init(&ss6, "Sed tristique porta lorem. Ut elementum est in magna laoreet, in lacinia ante blandit. Vestibulum condimentum sem vel ligula feugiat, vel venenatis ante placerat. Phasellus nec turpis viverra sapien vehicula sagittis vitae tincidunt lectus. Fusce posuere. ", 256);
    s_init(&ss7, NULL, 65536);
    s_init(&ss8, NULL, 65536);

    LoremIpsum = fopen("Lorem ipsum", "r");
    if(LoremIpsum == NULL) {
        perror("Error opening file ");
        return 1;
    }

    fgets(s7, 65536, LoremIpsum);
    fgets(s8, 65536, LoremIpsum);
    fgets(ss7.string, 65536, LoremIpsum);
    ss7.string[65535] = ' ';
    fgets(ss8.string, 65536, LoremIpsum);
    ss8.string[65535] = ' ';

    if(fclose(LoremIpsum) == EOF) {
        perror("Error closing file ");
        return 2;
    }

    s1 = malloc(8);
    strcpy(s1, "");
    strcat(s1, s3);
    free(s1);

    s_init(&ss1, NULL, 8);
    s_strcat(&ss1, &ss3);
    s_free(&ss1);

    s_init(&ss1, NULL, 8);
    s_strcat2(&ss1, &ss3);
    s_free(&ss1);


    s1 = malloc(256);
    strcpy(s1, "");
    strcat(s1, s5);
    free(s1);

    s_init(&ss1, NULL, 256);
    s_strcat(&ss1, &ss5);
    s_free(&ss1);

    s_init(&ss1, NULL, 256);
    s_strcat2(&ss1, &ss5);
    s_free(&ss1);


    s1 = malloc(65536);
    strcpy(s1, "");
    strcat(s1, s7);
    free(s1);

    s_init(&ss1, NULL, 65536);
    s_strcat(&ss1, &ss7);
    s_free(&ss1);

    s_init(&ss1, NULL, 65536);
    s_strcat2(&ss1, &ss7);
    s_free(&ss1);

    s_free(&ss3);
    s_free(&ss4);
    s_free(&ss5);
    s_free(&ss6);
    s_free(&ss7);
    s_free(&ss8);

    return 0;
}

sstring.h

#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct {
    unsigned int length;
    char *string;
} s_string;

s_string *s_init(s_string *str, char *array, size_t num) {
    int i;

    if(str == NULL) 
        str = malloc(sizeof(s_string));

    if(array == NULL) {
        str->length = num;

        if(num != 0)
            str->string = malloc(num);
        else
            str->string = NULL;
    } else {
        if(num == 0) {
            str->string = NULL;

            for(i = 0; array[i] != '\0'; i++) {
                str->string = realloc((void *)(str->string), i + 1);
                str->string[i] = array[i];
            }

            str->length = i;
        } else {
            str->string = malloc(num);

            str->length = num;

            for(i = 0; i < num; i++)
                str->string[i] = array[i];
        }
    }

    return str;
}

void s_free(s_string* str) {
  if(str != NULL  &&  str->string != NULL) {
    free(str->string);
    str->length = 0;
  }
}

s_string *s_strcat(s_string *destination, const s_string *source) {
    int i,
            j;

    for(i = destination->length, j = 0; j < source->length; i++, j++)
        destination->string[i] = source->string[j];

    destination->length += source->length;

    return destination;
}

// second version
s_string *s_strcat2(s_string *destination, const s_string *source) {
    int i;

    for(i = 0; i < source->length; i++)
        destination->string[i + destination->length] = source->string[i];

    destination->length += source->length;

    return destination;
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Consider one of your first tests with s_strcat():

    s_init(&ss1, NULL, 8);
    s_strcat(&ss1, &ss3);

At the end of s_init(), ss1 is initialized with memory allocated for 8 bytes.

   if(array == NULL) {
        str->length = num;

        if(num != 0)
            str->string = malloc(num);

However, s_strcat() is implemented to go to the end of the allocated memory, and copying the data from ss3:

    for(i = destination->length, j = 0; j < source->length; i++, j++)
        destination->string[i] = source->string[j];

That loop is writing beyond the end of your allocated memory, corrupting the heap data structures used by malloc() and friends.

s_strcat2() has a similar problem, writing beyond destination->length, which represents the size of the allocated memory.

    for(i = 0; i < source->length; i++)
        destination->string[i + destination->length] = source->string[i];

You can debug problems like this more easily by utilizing a memory debugging tool such as valgrind. valgrind can help you identify the lines of code in your software that have memory related bugs, such as writing to unallocated memory, writing beyond allocated memory, and freeing unallocated memory.

share|improve this answer
1  
Mention of memory debuggers such as valgrind would make this answer perfect. +1 from me :) –  undefined behaviour Aug 1 '13 at 7:01
    
@undefinedbehaviour: Ah, perfection. Answer updated, thanks. –  jxh Aug 1 '13 at 7:44
    
Thanks, I didn't realize that, because I assumed that the length of source would be always smaller, which doesn't have to be true, but even after correcting that in both s_strcat and s_strcat2 to check both lengths, it's still causing the same errors it did before, so I don't think this was the problem. I'll try valgrid to see if it can help me find the problem. –  The Red Fox Aug 1 '13 at 12:17
    
Nvm, it's fixed somehow now. Not sure why, but you probably helped. –  The Red Fox Aug 1 '13 at 17:08

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