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I know it's bad to use HTML Tables for everything... and that tables should be used only to present tabular data and not to achieve some style goal.

My question is, how do you make HTML forms with CSS so they look nice and aligned like when using tables?

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5 Answers 5

Nick Rigby wrote an excellent article for A List Apart titled Prettier Accessible Forms

Uses fieldset, legend, label. Highly semantic.

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Take a look at the code used in wufoo forms, they use ul's to format the forms and they look really good.

http://wufoo.com/gallery/templates/

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You can try and strip the form as far back as possible and make do with the <label> and various form input elements as needed with a lean on the clear:left; attribute in the CSS.

This would make sure each line starts anew without having to wrap each line of the form in an extra <div> or <p> or even making a list out of it.

.formlabel{
    clear:left;
    display:block;
    float:left;
    margin:0 0 1em 0;
    padding:0 0.5em 0 0;
    text-align:right;
    width:8em;
}

.forminput{
    float:left;
    margin:0 0.5em 0.5em 0;
}

.formwarning{
    clear:left;
    float:left;
    margin:0 0.5em 1em 0;
}

Here's a sample HTML form showing examples of various input types and an extra validation message that you can hide or style as needed:

<fieldset><legend>Details</legend>
    <label for="name" class="formlabel">Name</label>
      <input id="name" name="name" type="text" class="forminput" />
      <div class="formwarning">Validation error message</div>

    <label for="dob_year" class="formlabel">DOB</label>
      <div class="forminput">
        <input id="dob_year" name="dob_year" type="text" size="4" /> /
        <input id="dob_month" name="dob_month" type="text" size="2" /> /
        <input id="dob_day" name="dob_day" type="text" size="2" />
      </div>

    <label class="formlabel">Sex</label>
      <label for="female" class="forminput">Female</label>
        <input id="female" name="sex" type="radio" class="forminput" />
      <label for="male" class="forminput">Male</label>
        <input id="male" name="sex" type="radio" class="forminput" />

    <label for="state" class="formlabel">State</label>
      <select id="state" name="state" class="forminput">
        <option>ACT</option>
        <option>New South Wales</option>
        <option>Northern Territory</option>
        <option>Queensland</option>
        <option>South Australia</option>
        <option>Tasmania</option>
        <option>Victoria</option>
        <option>Western Australia</option>
      </select>

    <label for="deadseal" class="formlabel">Death certificate</label>
      <input id="deadseal" name="deadseal" type="file" class="forminput" />
</fieldset>

In the above example, the DOB does have an extra <div> cluttering things up. You could get rid of it if you style up the date slashes as part of the :after pseudo-element where needed.

Turns out okay in Opera 11.60, Firefox 11, Google Chrome 18 and Internet Explorer 8.

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I would lookup using the div tag to layout data on a page.

Tables are still very much useful for tabular data, but its frowned upon for laying out a page.

View source here on stackoverflow.com, there's probably some good examples.

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2  
hmm .... page source on SO looks to have lots of tables. :) –  Carlton Jenke Oct 7 '08 at 19:02
    
The <table> tag is used 24 times on this page. –  SSH This Jan 29 at 22:00
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Think about putting field names above the field, rather than beside. I find this works about the best.

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When done right, this makes forms infinitely more readable as your eyes only have to move in one direction instead of scanning back and forth. –  Runscope API Tools Oct 7 '08 at 19:17
    
It doesn't work very well though for complex forms. For me, it just forced me to simplify the forms, which is never a bad thing. –  Runscope API Tools Oct 7 '08 at 19:18
1  
We don't always have the luxury of specifying the design, unfortunately. –  Andrew Hedges Oct 7 '08 at 20:14
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