Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It seems that Python has some limitations regarding instance methods.

  1. Instance methods can't be copied.
  2. Instance methods can't be pickled.

This is problematic for me, because I work on a very object-oriented project in which I reference instance methods, and there's use of both deepcopying and pickling. The pickling thing is done mostly by the multiprocessing mechanism.

What would be a good way to solve this? I did some ugly workaround to the copying issue, but I'm looking for a nicer solution to both problems.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Update:

My use case: I have a tiny event system. Each event has an .action attribute that points to a function it's supposed to trigger, and sometimes that function is an instance method of some object.

share|improve this question
4  
Usually, we provide the code in all locations in which we're working and merely move a representation of the state around. Representation State Transfer is more common and simpler. What's wrong with that? –  S.Lott Nov 25 '09 at 17:15
    
S.Lott, you clearly have more experience with this issue, but please explain it to me in a more dumbed-down way, what exactly are you suggesting, how does it relate, what is "Representation State Transfer", etc. –  Ram Rachum Nov 25 '09 at 17:18
    
You're saying "I want to pickle instance methods", but you're not saying why. It would help us to know what problem you're trying to solve, since there may be a more Pythonic way to do it. It sounds a bit like you're thinking in Ruby... –  Jonathan Feinberg Nov 25 '09 at 17:21
    
Jonathan: I have a tiny event system. Each event has an .action attribute that points to a function it's supposed to trigger, and sometimes that function is an instance method of some object. –  Ram Rachum Nov 25 '09 at 17:29
    
@cool-RR: Please do not comment on your own question. It's your question. You own it. Please update the question with additional information. –  S.Lott Nov 25 '09 at 17:39
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You might be able to do this using copy_reg.pickle. In Python 2.6:

import copy_reg
import types

def reduce_method(m):
    return (getattr, (m.__self__, m.__func__.__name__))

copy_reg.pickle(types.MethodType, reduce_method)

This does not store the code of the method, just its name; but that will work correctly in the common case.

This makes both pickling and copying work!

share|improve this answer
    
Good idea, I think it might be the cleanest solution. Do you have any idea for the other problem, copying? Also, did anyone already implement a copy_reg solution that I can use? –  Ram Rachum Nov 25 '09 at 18:16
    
I edited the answer and added some code. –  Jason Orendorff Nov 25 '09 at 18:24
add comment

REST - Representation State Transfer. Just send state, not methods.

To transfer an object X from A to B, we do this.

  1. A encode the state of X in some handy, easy-to-parse notation. JSON is popular.

  2. A sends the JSON text to B.

  3. B decodes the state of X form JSON notation, reconstructing X.

B must have the class definitions for X's class for this to work. B must have all functions and other class definitions on which X's class depends. In short, both A and B have all the definitions. Only a representation of the object's state gets moved around.

See any article on REST.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Representational%5FState%5FTransfer

http://www.ics.uci.edu/~fielding/pubs/dissertation/top.htm

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please explain how this methodology relates to my problem with the event system? –  Ram Rachum Nov 25 '09 at 17:59
4  
This is a "you're doing it wrong" answer. This view is that pickle is maybe a little too convenient in Python; it's really better to exchange Plain Old Data (as opposed to object graphs) because it results in simpler systems that are saner to reason about. There's something in that, but if it's helpful to you at all it'll be helpful in a long-term way. –  Jason Orendorff Nov 25 '09 at 18:24
add comment

pickle the instance and then access the method after unpickling it. Pickling a method of an instance doesn't make sense because it relies on the instance. If it doesn't, then write it as an independent function.

import pickle

class A:
     def f(self):
         print 'hi'

x = A()
f = open('tmp', 'w')
r = pickle.dump(x, f)
f.close()
f = open('tmp', 'r')
pickled_x = pickle.load(f)
pickled_x.f()
share|improve this answer
1  
A() isn't an instance method. –  Jason Orendorff Nov 25 '09 at 17:54
    
You pickled the object, not the instance method. Try pickling an instance method directly. –  Ram Rachum Nov 25 '09 at 17:57
    
pickle the instance and then access the method after unpickling it. Pickling a method of an instance doesn't make sense because it relies on the instance. If it doesn't, then write it as an independent function. –  prime_number Nov 25 '09 at 18:17
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.