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I'm creating a program that will create a file and save it to the directory with the filename sample.xml. Once the file is saved when i try to run the program again it overwrites the old file into the new one because they do have the same file name. How do I increment the file names so that whenever I try to run the code again it will going to increment the file name. and will not overwrite the existing one. I am thinking of checking the filename first on the directory and if they are the same the code will generate a new filename:

fh = open("sample.xml", "w")
rs = [blockresult]
fh.writelines(rs)
fh.close()
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4 Answers 4

I would iterate through sample[int].xml for example and grab the next available name that is not used by a file or directory.

import os

i = 0
while os.path.exists("sample%s.xml" % i):
    i += 1

fh = open("sample%s.xml" % i, "w")
....

That should give you sample0.xml initially, then sample1.xml, etc.

Note that the relative file notation by default relates to the file directory/folder you run the code from. Use absolute paths if necessary. Use os.getcwd() to read your current dir and os.chdir(path_to_dir) to set a new current dir.

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Kindly asking what is non-useful or unconstructive here? Voting down without leaving a (constructive) comment seems to be more unconstructive to me. –  bossi Aug 1 '13 at 5:18
    
isfile() is not correct: a directory will match. You want exists() instead, but this is @Eiyrioü von Kauyf's answer. Furthermore, relative paths are not exactly "relative to the directory where the code is run from". They are instead more generally relative to the "current directory" (which is by default the directory that the code is run from). The current directory can be changed within the program, for instance. –  EOL Aug 1 '13 at 5:24
    
The fact that os.path.isfile() matches directories is new to me (and doesn't do as you describe for me on Python 3.3/win), isn't that why there is os.path.isdir() in place to differentiate between the two? In regards to the comment in my post towards the relative path notation neither Oliver Ven Quilnet's nor my example explicitly changes the current directory and I thought I briefly point it out to make it clear for the given context. –  bossi Aug 1 '13 at 5:48
1  
You are right, I should have been clearer. I meant that isfile() will make your loop exit when the name matches a directory, and your code tries then to open the directory in write mode, which fails with IOError. This is why isfile() is not the correct test, and should be replaced by the exists() of @Eiyrioü von Kauyf. As for relative paths, I really think that the current "the relative file notation always relates to the file directory/folder you run the code from" is misleading (because of "always"). –  EOL Aug 1 '13 at 6:41
    
@EOL: That's a good point, I honestly wasn't aware that identical names between a file and a folder in the same directory are illegal under Windows; thanks for pointing that out. I agree with you, the remark about the relative path did sound misleading, it should sound clearer now. –  bossi Aug 1 '13 at 7:52

Try setting a count variable, and then incrementing that variable nested inside the same loop you write your file in. Include the count loop inside the name of the file with an escape character, so every loop ticks +1 and so does the number in the file.

Some code from a project I just finished:

numberLoops = #some limit determined by the user
currentLoop = 1
while currentLoop < numberLoops:
    currentLoop = currentLoop + 1

    fileName = ("log%d_%d.txt" % (currentLoop, str(now())))

For reference:

from time import mktime, gmtime

def now(): 
   return mktime(gmtime()) 

which is probably irrelevant in your case but i was running multiple instances of this program and making tons of files. Hope this helps!

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2  
Python has for loops for this, they are much faster to read and comprehend than the while loops that emulate them. Furthermore, the % operator is deprecated. No downvote, though, because it does the job—it just does not do it in the preferred Python way. –  EOL Aug 1 '13 at 5:19
    
There is a problem with your format string: you format a string with %d, and this raises an exception. –  EOL Aug 1 '13 at 5:31
    
Thanks for catching that. It should be a %s, I retyped this rather hastily instead of copying from my source. Thanks! –  ford Aug 1 '13 at 5:36

Without storing state data in an extra file, a quicker solution to the ones presented here would be to do the following:

from glob import glob
import os

files = glob("somedir/sample*.xml")
files = files.sorted()
cur_num = int(os.path.basename(files[-1])[6:-4])
cur_num += 1
fh = open("somedir/sample%s.xml" % cur_num, 'w')
rs = [blockresult]
fh.writelines(rs)
fh.close()

This will also keep incrementing, even if some of the lower numbered files disappear.

The other solution here that I like (pointed out by Eiyrioü) is the idea of keeping a temporary file that contains your most recent number:

temp_fh = open('somedir/curr_num.txt', 'r')
curr_num = int(temp_fh.readline().strip())
curr_num += 1
fh = open("somedir/sample%s.xml" % cur_num, 'w')
rs = [blockresult]
fh.writelines(rs)
fh.close()
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Your cur_num calculation only works for 1-digit numbers, it is not general enough. –  EOL Aug 1 '13 at 5:21
    
Good point, updated. –  Vorticity Aug 1 '13 at 5:25

The two ways to do it are:

  1. Check for the existence of the old file and if it exists try the next file name +1
  2. save state data somewhere

an easy way to do it off the bat would be:

import os.path as pth
filename = "myfile"
filenum = 1
while (pth.exists(pth.abspath(filename+str(filenum)+".py")):
    filenum+=1
my_next_file = open(filename+str(filenum)+".py",'w')

as a design thing, while True slows things down and isn't a great thing for code readability


edited: @EOL contributions/ thoughts

so I think not having .format is more readable at first glance - but using .format is better for generality and convention so.

import os.path as pth
filename = "myfile"
filenum = 1
while (pth.exists(pth.abspath(filename+str(filenum)+".py")):
    filenum+=1
my_next_file = open("{}{}.py".format(filename, filenum),'w')
# or 
my_next_file = open(filename + "{}.py".format(filenum),'w')

and you don't have to use abspath - you can use relative paths if you prefer, I prefer abs path sometimes because it helps to normalize the paths passed :).

import os.path as pth
filename = "myfile"
filenum = 1
while (pth.exists(filename+str(filenum)+".py"):
    filenum+=1
##removed for conciseness
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The format() method is much more legible than string concatenation, here. I think that the while loop is fine, here. On another topic, why use abspath()? –  EOL Aug 1 '13 at 5:23
    
format is more legible, but then he would have to look at string formatting; this is easier to understand on first glance imho. and abspath because i'm ignoring symlinks :/ .... that could lead to confusing errors –  Eiyrioü von Kauyf Aug 1 '13 at 5:26
    
While I understand your point, I believe that even beginners should be shown Pythonic examples, so that they take good habits. The behavior of format() is really quite simple to understand and even guess: "{}{}.py".format(filename, filenum). It's even simpler than the algorithm presented here. :) –  EOL Aug 1 '13 at 5:29
    
hmm added :) i agree with you on this point. –  Eiyrioü von Kauyf Aug 1 '13 at 5:31
    
@EOL whatcha think ;) do I have your approval –  Eiyrioü von Kauyf Aug 1 '13 at 5:34

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