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I'm designing a (hopefully) simple GUI application using PyQt4 that I'm trying to make scalable. In brief, the user inputs some basic information and sends it into one of n queues (implementing waiting lists). Each of these n queues (QTableviews) are identical and each have controls to pop, delete from and rearrange its queue. These, along with some labels etc. form a 'module'. Currently my application is hardcoded to 4 queue modules, so there's elements named btn_table1_pop, btn_table2_pop...etc; four copies of every single module widget. This is obviously not very good UI design if you always assume your clients have four people that need waiting lists! I'd like to be able to easily modify this program so 8 people could use it, or 3 people could use it without a chunk of useless screen-estate!

The really naive solution to programming my application is duplicating the code for each module, but this is really messy, unmaintainable, and bounds my application to always four queues. A better thought would be to write functions for each button that sets an index and calls a function that implements the common logic, but I'm still hardcoded to 4, because the branch logic and the calling functions still have to take into account the names of the elements. If there was a way to 'vectorize' the names of the elements so that I could for example write

    btn_table[index]_pop.setEnabled(False)

...I could eliminate this branch logic and really condense my code. But I'm way too new at Python/PyQt to know if this is 1) even possible? or 2) how to even go about it/if this is even the way to go?

Thanks again, SO.

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In case anyone is interested I was able to get it working with dummybutton = getattr(self,'btn_table{}'.format(i)) and calling the button's methods on dummybutton.

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