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I am writing a multi-threaded program to scrape a certain site and collect ID's. It is storing these ID's in a shared static List<string> object.

When any item is added to the List<string>, it is first checked against a HashSet<string> which contains a blacklist of already collected ID's.

I do this as follows:

private static HashSet<string> Blacklist = new HashSet<string>();
private static List<string> IDList = new List<string>();

public static void AddIDToIDList(string ID)
{
    lock (IDList)
    {
        if (IsIDBlacklisted(ID))
            return;
        IDList.Add(ID);
    }
}
public static bool IsIDBlacklisted(string ID)
{
    lock (Blacklist)
    {
        if (Blacklist.Contains(ID))
            return true;
    }
    return false;
 }

The Blacklist is saved to a file after finishing and is loaded every time the program starts, therefore, it will get pretty large over time (up to 50k records). Is there a more efficient way to not only store this blacklist, but also to check each ID against it?

Thanks!

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1  
It should be fairly easy to test this by creating a large, fake Blacklist and using the System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch class to time operations. –  Greg Aug 1 '13 at 3:54
    
Thanks but I'm not sure of a better alternative to test against, hence the question. –  blizz Aug 1 '13 at 3:57
    
possible duplicate of What .NET collection provides the fastest search –  Greg Aug 1 '13 at 4:03
    
When does Blacklist get modified? –  Brian Gideon Aug 1 '13 at 4:15
    
Almost confused myself - this blacklist is not being modified until all operations have ceased. Then it saves to a text file which will be loaded next run. –  blizz Aug 1 '13 at 4:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To improve performance try to use ConcurrentBag<T> collection. Also there is no need to lock BlackList because it's not being modified e.g.:

private static HashSet<string> Blacklist = new HashSet<string>();
private static ConcurrentBag<string> IDList = new ConcurrentBag<string>();

public static void AddIDToIDList(string ID)
{
    if (Blacklist.Contains(ID))
    {
        return;
    }

    IDList.Add(ID);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That's very interesting. This provides better performance than HashSet<T>? Also, is it possible to not allow duplicates with ConcurrentBag<T>? –  blizz Aug 1 '13 at 4:51
    
    
So as I understand I must use sets to obtain a "no duplicates" rule, or write my own collection. If so, this does not achieve my purpose. –  blizz Aug 1 '13 at 5:00
2  
@blizz, This code has completely same behavior as yours but better performance. –  Kirill Polishchuk Aug 1 '13 at 5:36
1  
@blizz Your current code doesn't enforce a "no duplicates" rule either. List<T> is no set. –  CodesInChaos Aug 1 '13 at 6:24

Read operations are thread safe on HashSet, as long as Blacklist is not being modified you don't need to lock on it. Also you should lock inside the blacklist check so the lock is taken less often, this also will increase your performance.

private static HashSet<string> Blacklist = new HashSet<string>();
private static List<string> IDList = new List<string>();

public static void AddIDToIDList(string ID)
{
    if (IsIDBlacklisted(ID))
        return;
    lock (IDList)
    {
        IDList.Add(ID);
    }
}
public static bool IsIDBlacklisted(string ID)
{
    return Blacklist.Contains(ID);
}

If Blacklist is being modified the best way to lock around it is using a ReaderWriterLock (use the slim version if you are using a newer .NET)

private static HashSet<string> Blacklist = new HashSet<string>();
private static List<string> IDList = new List<string>();
private static ReaderWriterLockSlim BlacklistLock = new ReaderWriterLockSlim();

public static void AddIDToIDList(string ID)
{
    if (IsIDBlacklisted(ID))
        return;
    lock (IDList)
    {
        IDList.Add(ID);
    }
}
public static bool IsIDBlacklisted(string ID)
{
    BlacklistLock.EnterReadLock();
    try
    {
        return Blacklist.Contains(ID);
    }
    finally
    {
        BlacklistLock.ExitReadLock();
    }
}

public static bool AddToIDBlacklist(string ID)
{
    BlacklistLock.EnterWriteLock();
    try
    {
        return Blacklist.Add(ID);
    }
    finally
    {
        BlacklistLock.ExitWriteLock();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What is the benefit of using ReaderWriterLockSlim over a static lock object? –  blizz Aug 1 '13 at 5:01
    
ReaderWriterLock allows unlimited concurrent readers, it only acts like a lock when somone wants to write (then it blocks both writers and readers) –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 1 '13 at 5:05
    
But ReaderWriterLock(Slim)s per-call overhead is larger than that of lock, so chances are good that it's slower even in mostly-read scenarios. –  CodesInChaos Aug 1 '13 at 6:24
    
@CodesInChaos Do you have anything to back that up? In a highly contended read-frequently write-infrequently situation I would expect that ReadWriterLock would way out perform as you are never needing to block your threads except on the rare write occasions. I could see in single threaded situations or situations when there is no contention lock would cheaper, but then why are you locking if the resource is never going to be contented? –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 1 '13 at 6:49
1  
@ScottChamberlain I don't remember the source and it might be outdated. But what remember is that for fine-grained locking lock is typically better, since its overhead is smaller. For coarse grained locking, ReadWriterLockSlim pulls ahead if it's a mostly-read scenario. Benchmark your specific scenario with both kinds locks. Don't simply assume one of them is faster. –  CodesInChaos Aug 1 '13 at 6:52

Two considerations - First, if you use the indexer of a .NET dictionary (i.e., System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary) like this (rather than calling the Add() method):

idList[id] = id;

then it will add the item if it doesn't already exist - otherwise, it will replace the existing item at that key. Second, you can use the ConcurrentDictionary (in the System.Collections.Concurrent namespace) for thread-safety so you don't have to worry about the locking yourself. Same comment applies about using the indexer.

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1  
Interesting note - +1. Unfortunately, it doesn't answer my question about efficiency. –  blizz Aug 1 '13 at 5:02
    
Actually, I was saying this is more efficient because you can just call the indexer with 1 line of code rather than doing a Contains() check followed by an Add(). –  Steve Michelotti Aug 1 '13 at 5:06

In your scenario, yes, HashSet is the best option for this since it contains one value to look up unlike a Dictionary which requires a key and a value to do a lookup.

And ofcourse as others have said no need of locking HashSet if it is not being modified. and consider marking it as readonly.

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