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I have got one method say Login in "First class". Now in my "Second class" again Login is needed to be done, so can anyone tell me what's the easiest way to do this task ?

  1. Should i create object of first class in second class and call to methods of first class.
  2. Should i create base class and extend it ?

Please provide any example if possible Thanks

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If the Login of First and Second class is the same then just create it in the base class and use it in both classes... Also you can override this method if it changes in the Child class... Go by the second approach which will involve better inheritance... –  NREZ Aug 1 '13 at 5:40
    
Hey thanks, for quick reply :). Can you tell me if i can mention any order of execution when extended the base class. E.g : I wrote the "login" method in Base class and extended in "First Class", now i have got another method in "First Class" say(addtest), so can i mention any execution order that it should first(login) and then (addtest) –  user2376425 Aug 1 '13 at 5:53
    
@user2376425: What are the two classes? Are they classes containing junit tests, or are they something different? –  vincebowdren Aug 6 '13 at 14:04
    
@vincebowdren : Yes they contain junit tests –  user2376425 Aug 7 '13 at 3:54
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Alright let me answer this here:

class MyBase
{
    void Login()
    {
        // TODO base defined login here
    }
}

class FirstClass extends MyBase
{
    // Define your methods in any order it is fine

    void Login()
    {
        // TODO firstclass defined login here
    }

    void addTest()
    {
        // Addtest code here
    }
}

int main()
{
    MyBase base;
    FirstClass firstClass;

    base.Login() // Will call the MyBase method for Login
    firstClass.Login() // Will call the FirstClass method for Login
}

So the order of defining methods isn't important as long as you are doing them nicely. If possible read about Inheritance in Java to be more clear with your approach.

Do you understand this completely now..? If yes then start coding and if not then let me know and we'll go more deeper...

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Well thanks for the answer, it have kindoff solved my query :) –  user2376425 Aug 1 '13 at 7:11
    
@NREZ - How does that help? You've defined something you've called 'MyBase', but you're not using it as a base class because nothing is inheriting from it. And you've got two different Login() methods defined, which is the problem the OP was trying to get away from. –  vincebowdren Aug 6 '13 at 14:01
    
Thanks for pointing it out @vincebowdren... I forgot to extend MyBase class, though somehow the OP and I understood it... Also I've tried to keep it as a very simple prototype... –  NREZ Aug 6 '13 at 14:49
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I would recommend implementing a Page Object Model, and refactor the login code to be a method of the object representing the login screen. That way, the login code will be most easily available to any testcase which needs to perform a login. The code will look something like this simplified version:

public class LogInScreen {

    public void LogIn(String username, String password) {
        userNameTextField.sendKeys(username);
        passwordTextField.sendKeys(password);
        loginButton.click();
    }

public class MyTests {

    @Test
    public void testLoginNormalUser() {
        String username = "userA";
        String password = "badg3rs";
        publicscreen.LogIn(username, password);
        // carry on with the rest of the test.
    }

    @Test
    public void testLoginAdminUser() {
        String username = "userB";
        String password = "3lk";
        publicscreen.LogIn(username, password);
        // carry on with the rest of the test.
    }

Notice the benefits you get from this:

  1. The code which interacts with the login controls is in a class representing the login screen; the testcase code doesn't need to concern itself with the UI details too much, so each @test can just concern itself with test logic.
  2. Any testcase can call the login() method.
  3. It's simple: there's no need for inheritance or overloading.
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Yup this can certainly be a better implementation... @user2376425 you should try this out... –  NREZ Aug 7 '13 at 9:17
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