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When I reverse engineer my classes I get the following:

    public Nullable<bool> Correct { get; set; }
    public Nullable<bool> Response { get; set; }

I coded:

    public bool? Correct { get; set; }
    public bool? Response { get; set; }

Can someone tell me if there is any difference between these two. I have not seen the Nullable<bool> before and I'm not sure why it does not just create a "bool".

Note: I changed my coded to bool? in response to comments by Jon

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marked as duplicate by Jon Skeet, Iridium, shambulator, RAS, Donal Fellows Aug 1 '13 at 12:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I suspect you actually coded public bool? Correct { get; set; }. The compiler doesn't convert bool into bool? automatically. –  Jon Skeet Aug 1 '13 at 6:04
    
You sure you didn't write bool? instead of bool? –  Robert Rouhani Aug 1 '13 at 6:04
    
I noticed that Nullable<bool> requires the System namespace but bool? does not. Anyone know what that is ? –  Alan Aug 1 '13 at 6:11
    
If you use a different tool to reverse engineer your code, it might produce bool? back - this should be a hint to you that there's no difference - the reverse engineering tool cannot know which of the two you wrote. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Aug 1 '13 at 6:14
    
bool? is just an alias the C# compiler defined for your convenience. –  CodesInChaos Aug 1 '13 at 6:19
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

"A Nullable can be assigned the values true false, or null. The ability to assign null to numeric and Boolean types is especially useful when you are dealing with databases and other data types that contain elements that may not be assigned a value. For example, a Boolean field in a database can store the values true or false, or it may be undefined."

Nullable Types

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3  
This doesn't explain what's going on in the OP's situation - which I suspect to be a misdiagnosis. –  Jon Skeet Aug 1 '13 at 6:04
    
I don't follow. –  Iker Ruiz Arnauda Aug 1 '13 at 6:07
    
@Jon - Now I realize that the database allows NULLs and my code does not. The database scripts were done by our DBA and I coded the classes (incorrectly). I still wonder why the reverse engineer does not just specify bool? –  Alan Aug 1 '13 at 6:07
    
Well, at least now you can also do sanity check on your DB. –  Iker Ruiz Arnauda Aug 1 '13 at 6:08
1  
@Alan Nullable<bool> and bool? is similar to int and System.Int32. They are just two ways of representing the same thing. You had to add the System namespace because you where using the longer version, just like you would need to add System if you used Int32 instead of int. –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 1 '13 at 7:03
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Can someone tell me if there is any difference between these two. I have not seen the Nullable before and I'm not sure why it does not just create a "bool"

technically there is no difference in Nullable and bool?. Whatever you write they will compile down to Nullable in IL. so no difference. The ? is just C# compiler syntax.

why require system for Nullable

it is because it is used as a type. And type needs to be in a namespace.

But there is a difference in bool and bool?. As bool is a simple value type that cannot be assigned null value whereas you can assign value to bool?.

Nullable represents a value type that can be assigned null and it lies in the namespace System.

Further as it can be assigned null therefore you can check whether it has value or not like this

if(Correct.HasValue)
{
  //do some work
}
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Nullable<bool> and bool? are equivalent ("?" suffix is a syntactic sugar). Nullable<bool> means that in addition to typical bool values: true and false, there's a third value: null.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/1t3y8s4s(v=vs.80).aspx http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2cf62fcy.aspx

Null value could be useful if you work with uncertain values, e.g. in some cases you can't tell if the instance is correct one or not, if any response has been given; for instance in your case

  // true  - instance is correct
  // false - instance is incorrect
  // null  - additional info required
  public bool? Correct { get; set; }
  // true  - response was given 
  // false - no response
  // null  - say, the response is in the process
  public bool? Response { get; set; }
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Yes there is difference between Nullable<bool> and bool.

public Nullable<bool> Correct { get; set; } // can assign both true/false and null
Correct = null;  //possible 

whereas

in your case you can't have it

public bool Correct { get; set; } //can assign only true/false
Correct = null;  //not possible

Maybe the previous guy who coded may not exposed to bool? dataType.

System.Nullable<bool> is equivalent to bool?

Update: There is no difference between Nullable<bool> and bool?

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Hello. I just upvoted you because of your answer. Note that I now changed my code to bool? I realize it was my mistake. –  Alan Aug 1 '13 at 6:13
    
@Alan no difference,known as alias. –  Praveen Aug 1 '13 at 6:22
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There is no difference.

Hint: Nullable<Nullable<bool>> n; // not allowed

Source msdn Nullable Types

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