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I have just been reading page 93-4 of Effective Java, but I have come across the term a mixin. But I am finding it difficult to visualise what a mixin actually is. Could anybody please help me out by providing an example of a Mixin in Java. Thank you for your help because I have searched Stackoverfolw and the Internet, but found nothing really conclusive of clear.

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marked as duplicate by Narendra Pathai, Nicolas, blackpanther, Philipp, mlk Aug 1 '13 at 8:51

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There isn't just a single meaning for mix-in. If you provided a quote from the book, it would be easier to help. –  Alexey Romanov Aug 1 '13 at 7:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're referring to Item 18 of Effective Java - Prefer interfaces to abstract classes, and I believe the following section in particular:

Interfaces are ideal for defining mixins. Loosely speaking, a mixin is a type that a class can implement in addition to its "primary type" to declare that it provides some optional behaviour. For exampleComparable is a mixin interface that allows a class to declare that it its instances are ordered with respect to other mutually comparable objects. Such an interface is called mixin because it allows the optional functionality to be "mixed in" to the type's primary functionality. Abstract classes can't be used to define mixins for the same reason that they can't be be retrofitted onto existing classes: a class cannot have more than one parent, and there is no reasonable place in the class hierarchy to insert a mixin.

Essentially, one of the key differences between specifying functionality in an abstract class and in an interface is that the interface version can be used in a number of different class hierarchies, whereas an abstract class can only be used in the one class hierarchy tree because Java only allows single-inheritance.

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1  
It's useful to compare this definition to a mixin in another language like Ruby or Python. In those languages, classes can have multiple parents, and so it is possible for a class to bring in logic from an arbitrary number of generic parents. They are considered mixins because rather than being considered the primary parent of a class, they are some additional logic that has been "mixed in." Example: ruby-doc.org/docs/ProgrammingRuby/html/tut_modules.html#S2 –  Brandon Yarbrough Aug 1 '13 at 8:14
1  
Interfaces are not mix-ins. Interface doesn't hold state or even code, therefore it's not a mix-in. For instance you cannot define a mix-in called Traversable with one abstract method forEach and 10 concrete methods that provide functionality based on it (drop, take, filter, map,...).With interfaces you can declare all these methods, but any class implementing this interface will have to provide implementation for all of them instead of just 1.Abstract classes work great for this, but they are limited to just 1 as parent of a class and they put you in specific hierarchies.Not mixin –  U Mad Aug 1 '13 at 9:00

There is no such thing as mix-in in java since there's no way to add the a piece of code to classes in separate hierarchies. To do so would require multiple inheritance or a least Scala type traits.

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1  
What about Aspects? –  Web Devie Aug 1 '13 at 7:46
    
Aspects are not part of Java language. Aspects in java are implemented by byte-code weaving after the code is complied, so it's an after-compile tool. –  U Mad Aug 1 '13 at 8:05
    
But java enables such byte-code weaving. And interface-proxies are a part of Java. –  Web Devie Aug 1 '13 at 8:23
    
Interface proxies do not provide a full mix-in support. –  U Mad Aug 1 '13 at 8:52

In 'Effective Java'`s scope, it is mentioned just logically, without specific Java implementation. For example, a Comparable interface. It doesn't change your class purpose or confuse your api users. It just mixes in functionality for sorting and comparation. So, in a Java context I would narrow this to a Decorator pattern.

Another variation on a mix-in could be the following. Assume, you have:

interface IMyInterface
{
    public void doStuff();
}

class MyClass implements IMyInterface
{
    public void doStuff(){};
}

Now we want to 'mix in' some additional functionality. We add an abstract class:

abstract class AbstractMixInProvider
{
    public abstracrt void doMixinStuff();
}

And we extend MyClass from AbstractMixInProvider:

class MyClass extends AbstractMixInProvider implements IMyInterface
{
    public void doStuff(){};
    public void doMixinStuff();
}

But, as I`ve mentioned above, trying to pull mix-in concept to Java looks ugly, because it is just play on words.

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The example is for only one interface, which is no mixin –  Web Devie Aug 1 '13 at 8:24
    
In this example I`ve used AbstractMixInProvider as a mixin. It is not the point if it is an interface or not. I tried to discribe a sample situation for @blackpanther, so he could understand the approach from 'Effective Java'. –  Michael Cheremuhin Aug 1 '13 at 8:27
    
You can't do this with 2 abstract classes this way. –  Web Devie Aug 1 '13 at 8:34
    
No, you cant. That why you can use multiple interfaces for your target class or one AbstractMixinProvider with multiple interfaces in it. Thats why I think, that calling all this stuff 'mixin' is weird. –  Michael Cheremuhin Aug 1 '13 at 8:38

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