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I am new to the bit fields concept. I am trying to access the elements in the structure, but it is showing the error at aa=v like this.

error: incompatible types when assigning to type ‘cc’ from type ‘long unsigned int ’

And it is showing error if I typecasted at aa= (cc)v;

error: conversion to non-scalar type requested

I tried accessing the elements by declaring a pointer to a structure. I did well in this case, but in this case I do not declare a pointer to a structure and I have to access the elements. How can I overcome this error.

Thanks for any help in advance

#include<stdio.h>
typedef struct 
{
        unsigned long a:8;
    unsigned long b:8;
    unsigned long c:8;
    unsigned long d:8;
}cc;


int main()
{ 
        cc aa ;
    unsigned long v = 1458;
    printf("%d\n",sizeof(aa));
    aa=v;    // aa= (cc)v;
    printf("%d %d %d %d\n", aa.a,aa.b,aa.c,aa.d);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
I'd probably use uint8_ts from inttypes.h if you need 8 bit sized bitfields (sorry if this is obvious). –  m01 Aug 1 '13 at 9:36

5 Answers 5

If you intend to access the same data as multiple data-types, then you need to use an union in C. Take a look at the following snippet that will

  1. Write to a union treating it as a 32bit integer
    (and then)
  2. Access the data back as 4 individual 8bit bit-fields
    (and also for good measure)
  3. Access the same data back again as a 32bit integer

#include<stdio.h>

typedef struct {
    unsigned long a:8;
    unsigned long b:8;
    unsigned long c:8;
    unsigned long d:8;
}bitfields;

union data{
    unsigned long i;
    bitfields bf;
};

int main()
{ 
    union data x;
    unsigned long v = 0xaabbccdd;
    printf("sizeof x is %dbytes\n",sizeof(x));

    /* write to the union treating it as a single integer */
    x.i = v;

    /* read from the union treating it as a bitfields structure */
    printf("%x %x %x %x\n", x.bf.a, x.bf.b, x.bf.c, x.bf.d);

    /* read from the union treating it as an integer */
    printf("0x%x\n", x.i);

    return 0;
}

Note that when union is accessed as an integer, the endian-ness of the system determines the order of the individual bit-fields. Hence the above program on a 32bit x86 PC (little-endian) will output :

sizeof x is 4bytes
dd cc bb aa
0xaabbccdd
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It's because aa is a structure and v is not, the types are incompatible just like the error message says. Even if cc is a structure of bitfields, it still can only be used as a structure, with separate members, and not like an integer.

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but you wanted to assign a 4 byte sized long to your 4 byte sized struct. If yes, this might be for you:

 aa = *(cc*)&v;

However you should be aware about endianness in this case

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Use this :

aa.a = v;

Instead of

aa = v;
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you are trying to assign a long to a struct which are incompatible.

you can assign inner value of cc to v:

cc c;
unsigned long v = 1458;
c.b = v;

if you want the first 8 bits to be in a for example you can do

cc c;
unsigned long v = 1458;
c.a = v % 255;
c.b = v / 255 % 65280;
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't that lead to overflow? Isn't 255 the maximum integer value a field of eight bits can hold? –  verbose Aug 1 '13 at 9:15
    
1458 binary value is : 10110110010; my aim is to get first 8 bits into structure element a, i.e,10110010 = 178; and next 8 bits to element b:101=5....If I am doing as u said the first element is taking first 8 bits and remaining elements it is showing 0..... –  user2641184 Aug 1 '13 at 9:23
    
then you can use module for that @user2641184 –  No Idea For Name Aug 1 '13 at 10:00

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