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I don't have a problem; I'm just curious. Imagine the following scenario:

foreach (var foo in list)
{
    try
    {
         //Some code
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        //Some more code
    }
    finally
    {
        continue;
    }
}

This won't compile, as it raises compiler error CS0157:

Control cannot leave the body of a finally clause

Why?

share|improve this question
7  
So. Just curious. If it makes complete sense to you why it won't compile, why do you want someone to explain what already makes sense? =) –  J. Steen Aug 1 '13 at 10:10
14  
why would you need a continue; in finally block? isn't it same as continue; after the try -- catch block? –  bansi Aug 1 '13 at 10:10
6  
@J.Steen No, I DO know that the finally/continue is a limitation of the C# compiler :-) I'm curious too on the reason of this limitation. –  xanatos Aug 1 '13 at 10:14
5  
@xanatos - Technically speaking, it's a limitation of the underlying CIL. From the language spec: "Control transfer is never permitted to enter a catch handler or finally clause except through the exception handling mechanism." and "Control transfer out of a protected region is only permitted through an exception instruction (leave, end.filter, end.catch, or end.finally)." The br family of branch instructions cannot accomplish this. –  Unsigned Aug 1 '13 at 20:04
1  
@Unsigned: it is a good limitation too, allowing it would be bizarre :) –  user7116 Aug 8 '13 at 17:27

11 Answers 11

up vote 146 down vote accepted

finally blocks run whether an exception is thrown or not. If an exception is thrown, what the heck would continue do? You cannot continue execution of the loop, because an uncaught exception will transfer control to another function.

Even if no exception is thrown, finally will run when other control transfer statements inside the try/catch block run, like a return, for example, which brings the same problem.

In short, with the semantics of finally it doesn't make sense to allow transferring control from inside a finally block to the outside of it.

Supporting this with some alternative semantics would be more confusing than helpful, since there are simple workarounds that make the intended behaviour way clearer. So you get an error, and are forced to think properly about your problem. It's the general "throw you into the pit of success" idea that goes on in C#.

C#, you, and the out if success

If you want to ignore exceptions (more often than not is a bad idea) and continue executing the loop, use a catch all block:

foreach ( var in list )
{
    try{
        //some code
    }catch{
        continue;
    }
}

If you want to continue only when no uncaught exceptions are thrown, just put continue outside the try-block.

share|improve this answer
11  
I will accept this as the answer, because you make understand the reasons why Microsoft possibly decided to not accept a continue in a finally. Probably that images has convinced me too :) –  lpaloub Aug 1 '13 at 11:11
20  
can you elaborate the "throw you into the pit of success" idea? I didn't get it :-D –  Ant Aug 1 '13 at 11:28
9  
@Ant codinghorror.com/blog/2007/08/… –  Josh Aug 1 '13 at 11:37
12  
The image was made by Jon Skeet, btw. I got from here: msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/2010/09/02/… –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 1 '13 at 11:51
1  
Of course, a continue in a finally block will be OK if it only continues a local loop defined inside the finally block. In the question, however, it tries to continue an "outer" loop. Similar statements that you can't have inside a finally block are return, break (when breaking out of the block) and goto (when going to a label outside the finally block). For a related Java discussion, see Returning from a finally block in Java. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Aug 1 '13 at 15:27

Here is a reliable source:

A continue statement cannot exit a finally block (Section 8.10). When a continue statement occurs within a finally block, the target of the continue statement must be within the same finally block; otherwise, a compile-time error occurs.

It is taken from MSDN, 8.9.2 The continue statement.

The documentation say that:

The statements of a finally block are always executed when control leaves a try statement. This is true whether the control transfer occurs as a result of normal execution, as a result of executing a break, continue, goto, or return statement, or as a result of propagating an exception out of the try statement. If an exception is thrown during execution of a finally block, the exception is propagated to the next enclosing try statement. If another exception was in the process of being propagated, that exception is lost. The process of propagating an exception is discussed further in the description of the throw statement (Section 8.9.5).

It is from here 8.10 The try statement.

share|improve this answer

You may think it makes sense, but it doesn't make sense actually.

foreach (var v in List)
{
    try
    {
        //Some code
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        //Some more code
        break; or return;
    }
    finally
    {
        continue;
    }
}

What do you intend to do a break or a continue when an exception is thrown? The C# compiler team doesn't want to make decision on their own by assuming break or continue. Instead, they decided to complain the developer situation will be ambiguous to transfer control from finally block.

So it is the job of developer to clearly state what he intends to do rather than compiler assuming something else.

I hope you understand why this doesn't compile!

share|improve this answer
    
On a related note, even if there were no "catch", the execution path following a finally statement would be affected by whether the catch had exited via exception, and there is no mechanism to say how that should interact with a continue. I like your example, though, because it shows an even bigger problem. –  supercat Aug 2 '13 at 18:17
    
@supercat Agree with you, my answer shows an example of ambiguous situation for compiler still there are so many problems with this approach. –  Sriram Sakthivel Aug 2 '13 at 19:51
    
@Tevo Thanks for your edit –  Sriram Sakthivel Aug 6 '13 at 12:26

As others have stated, but focused on exceptions, it's really about ambiguous handling of transferring control.

In your mind, you're probably thinking of a scenario like this:

public static object SafeMethod()
{
    foreach(var item in list)
    {
        try
        {
            try
            {
                //do something that won't transfer control outside
            }
            catch
            {
                //catch everything to not throw exceptions
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            if (someCondition)
                //no exception will be thrown, 
                //so theoretically this could work
                continue;
        }
    }

    return someValue;
}

Theoretically, you can track the control flow and say, yes, this is "ok". No exception is thrown, no control is transferred. But the C# language designers had other issues in mind.

The Thrown Exception

public static void Exception()
{
    try
    {
        foreach(var item in list)
        {
            try
            {
                throw new Exception("What now?");
            }
            finally
            {
                continue;
            }
        }
    }
    catch
    {
        //do I get hit?
    }
}

The Dreaded Goto

public static void Goto()
{
    foreach(var item in list)
    {
        try
        {
            goto pigsfly;
        }
        finally
        {
            continue;
        }
    }

    pigsfly:
}

The Return

public static object ReturnSomething()
{
    foreach(var item in list)
    {
        try
        {
            return item;
        }
        finally
        {
            continue;
        }
    }
}

The Breakup

public static void Break()
{
    foreach(var item in list)
    {
        try
        {
            break;
        }
        finally
        {
            continue;
        }
    }
}

So in conclusion, yes, while there is a slight possibility of using a continue in situations where control isn't being transferred, but a good deal (majority?) of cases involve exceptions or return blocks. The language designers felt this would be too ambiguous and (likely) impossible to ensure at compile time that your continue is used only in cases where control flow is not being transferred.

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In general continue does not make sense when used in finally block. Take a look at this:

foreach (var item in list)
{
    try
    {
        throw new Exception();
    }
    finally{
        //doesn't make sense as we are after exception
        continue;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
"In general" a lot of things don't make sense. And it doesn't mean it shouldn't work "in particular". IE: continue makes no sense outside loop statement, but it doesn't mean it's not supported. –  zerkms Aug 1 '13 at 10:15
    
I think it make some sense. item can be file, read failed -> finally closes the file. continue prevents rest of the processing. –  jnovacho Aug 1 '13 at 10:15
1  
@jnovacho an exception being thrown already prevents that. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 1 '13 at 10:18

"This won't compile and I think it makes complete sense"

Well, I think it doesn't.

When you literally have catch(Exception) then you don't need the finally (and probably not even the continue).

When you have the more realistic catch(SomeException), what should happen when an exception is not caught? Your continue wants to go one way, the exception handling another.

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2  
I think you could need finally when you have catch. It's commonly used for closing resources in reliable way. –  jnovacho Aug 1 '13 at 10:19
    
It's not just exceptions though. You could easily have a return statement within your try or catch blocks. What do we do now? Return or continue the loop? (and if we do continue, what if it's the last item to iterate? Then we just continue outside the foreach and the return never happens?) EDIT: Or even goto to a label outside the loop, pretty much any action that transfers control outside the foreach loop. –  Chris Sinclair Aug 1 '13 at 10:21
2  
I don't agree with "When you literally have catch(Exception) then you don't need the finally (and probably not even the continue).". What if I need to do an operation whatever an exception has raised or not? –  lpaloub Aug 1 '13 at 10:30
    
OK, the finally caters for additional returns inside the block. But normally execution continues after the catch-all. –  Henk Holterman Aug 1 '13 at 11:08
    
'finally' is not 'catch'. It should be used for cleanup code. a finally block runs regardless whether an exception is thrown or not. Stuff like closing files, or freeing memory (if you're using unmanaged code) etc. these are the things you put in a finally block –  Robotnik Aug 1 '13 at 11:46

You cannot leave the body of a finally block. This includes break, return and in your case continue keywords.

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The finally block can be executed with an exception waiting to be rethrown. It wouldn't really make sense to be able to exit the block (by a continue or anything else) without rethrowing the exception.

If you want to continue your loop whatever happens, you do not need the finally statement: Just catch the exception and don't rethrow.

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finally runs whether or not an uncaught exception is thrown. Others have already explained why this makes continue illogical, but here is an alternative that follows the spirit of what this code appears to be asking for. Basically, finally { continue; } is saying:

  1. When there are caught exceptions, continue
  2. When there are uncaught exceptions, allow them to be thrown, but still continue

(1) could be satisfied by placing continue at the end of each catch, and (2) could be satisfied by storing uncaught exceptions to be thrown later. You could write it like this:

var exceptions = new List<Exception>();
foreach (var foo in list) {
    try {
        // some code
    } catch (InvalidOperationException ex) {
        // handle specific exception
        continue;
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        exceptions.Add(ex);
        continue;
    }
    // some more code
}
if (exceptions.Any()) {
    throw new AggregateException(exceptions);
}

Actually, finally would have also executed in the third case, where there were no exceptions thrown at all, caught or uncaught. If that was desired, you could of course just place a single continue after the try-catch block instead of inside each catch.

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Technically speaking, it's a limitation of the underlying CIL. From the language spec:

Control transfer is never permitted to enter a catch handler or finally clause except through the exception handling mechanism.

and

Control transfer out of a protected region is only permitted through an exception instruction (leave, end.filter, end.catch, or end.finally)

On the doc page for the br instruction:

Control transfers into and out of try, catch, filter, and finally blocks cannot be performed by this instruction.

This last holds true for all branch instructions, including beq, brfalse, etc.

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The designers of the language simply didn't want to (or couldn't) reason about the semantics of a finally block being terminated by a control transfer.

One issue, or perhaps the key issue, is that the finally block gets executed as part of some non-local control transfer (exception processing). The target of that control transfer isn't the enclosing loop; the exception processing aborts the loop and continues unwinding further.

If we have a control transfer out of the finally cleanup block, then the original control transfer is being "hijacked". It gets canceled, and control goes elsewhere.

The semantics can be worked out. Other languages have it.

The designers of C# decided to simply disallow static, "goto-like" control transfers, thereby simplifying things somewhat.

However, even if you do that, it doesn't solve the question of what happens if a dynamic transfer is initiated from a finally: what if the finally block calls a function, and that function throws? The original exception processing is then "hijacked".

If you work out the semantics of this second form of hijacking, there is no reason to banish the first type. They are really the same thing: a control transfer is a control transfer, whether it the same lexical scope or not.

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The difference is that finally by definition must be immediately followed by continuing the transfer that triggered it (an uncaught exception, return, etc.). It would be easy to allow "goto-like" transfers within finally (which languages do this, by the way?), but doing so would mean that try { return } finally { ... } may not return, which is completely unexpected. If finally calls a function that throws, that's not really the same thing, because we already expect that exceptions may occur at any time and interrupt normal flow. –  nmclean Aug 1 '13 at 21:43
    
@nmclean: Actually, an exception which escapes finally is sorta same thing, in that it can result in unexpected and illogical program flow. The only difference is that the language designers, being unable to reject all programs where a finally block could throw an unhandled exception, instead allow such programs to compile and hope the program can accept any consequences that may follow the abandonment of the earlier exception-unwinding sequence. –  supercat Aug 2 '13 at 18:26
    
@supercat I agree that it breaks expected flow, but my point is that that is always the case for unhandled exceptions, whether the current flow is a finally or not. By the logic of Kaz's last paragraph, functions should also be free to affect the flow in their caller's scope by way of continue etc., because they are allowed to do so by way of exceptions. But this of course is not allowed; exceptions are the sole exception to this rule, hence the name "exception" (or "interrupt"). –  nmclean Aug 2 '13 at 18:48
    
@nmclean: Non-nested exceptions represent a control flow which differs from normal execution, but is still structured. The statement following a block should only execute if all exceptions that occurred within that block were caught within it. That might seem like a reasonable expectation, but an exception which occurs within a finally block can violate it. Really a nasty situation, which IMHO should have been solved by at minimum letting finally blocks know about any pending exceptions so they can build composite exception objects. –  supercat Aug 2 '13 at 19:04
    
@mmclean Sorry, I do not agree that the name "exception" comes from some "exception to the rule" (regarding control) specific to C#, LOL. The control flow altering aspect of an exception is simply a non-local dynamic control transfer. A regular control transfer within the same lexical scope (no unwinding taking place) can be regarded as a special case of that. –  Kaz Aug 2 '13 at 21:20

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