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I am trying to make a .deb package out of a python project I am working on. The program needs a .sqlite file though, that somehow needs to be initialized (create it and set up tables, associations etc). Although there is a lot of documentation on deb package creation, e.g.

-From Debian Wiki

-A python-specific tutorial

I was not able to find good suggestions regarding the following questions:

  1. is it better to incorporate an initialized .sqlite file in the list of files to be copied (installed) or to include the .sqlite file creation / setup in the installation process?

  2. if the second option is preferable, where should the table creation script should go? I guess the obvious assumption is to do that in the rules file (or not?). And if this process goes to rules file, should we do this by using shell scripting (rules is a makefile)

  3. the second link above suggests the usage of a postinst script (where the above issue could be addressed) but I have not seen this practice anywhere else? Is it a common practice?

  4. what is the best way to have the target machine checked for dependencies? (sqlite3, python3.2 - does the build-depends field of the control file checks if the dependencies exist on the target machine, so as to abort package installation if e.g. sqlite3 or python3.2 are missing?

Many thanks

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2 Answers 2

I think you should just go with a pre-generated SQLite file. It is the simplest solution, and I don't see any shortcomings.

As for declaring install-time (aka, run-time) dependencies, you need to place them in debian/control, in a binary package section, one starting with Package (example). That way, Debian packaging tools will refuse to install the package if such dependencies are unsatisfied (unless you ask nicely, e.g. using dpkg --force-depends --install <package name>).

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After a lot of trial and error here is what seems to be working best for the time being:

  1. The sqlite db file gets generated during (post)installation time

  2. I did that within the postinst file, using as a bash script and using constants for table creation and primary/foreign key assignment statements as follows

    #!/bin/bash
    set -e
    
    CREATE_TBL_PROBLEMS="CREATE TABLE tblProblems(
    ID INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT,
    Name TEXT NOT NULL UNIQUE
    )"
    
    CREATE_TBL_MAIN="CREATE TABLE tblMain (
    ID INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT,
    DBVersion TEXT NOT NULL,
    DBrDate TEXT NOT NULL)"
    
    CREATE_TBL_EVENTS="CREATE TABLE tblEvents (
    ID INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT,
    User TEXT NOT NULL,
    NoOfInfections INTEGER NOT NULL,
    NoOfHealings INTEGER NOT NULL,
    DateTime TEXT NOT NULL,
    VirusDBID INTEGER NOT NULL,
    FOREIGN KEY(tblMainID) REFERENCES tblMain(ID)
    )"
    
    CREATE_TBL_ISSUES="CREATE TABLE tblIssues (
    ID INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT,
    FilePath TEXT NOT NULL,
    Inode INTEGER NOT NULL UNIQUE,
    ScanEventID INTEGER NOT NULL,
    MalwareID INTEGER NOT NULL,
    FOREIGN KEY(EventID) REFERENCES tblEvents(ID),
    FOREIGN KEY(ProblemID) REFERENCES tblProblems(ID)
    )"
    

The main challenge was the following: the application was supposed to go in /usr/share/myapplication owned by root as is the common practice and db file (sqlite) should be a user owned file. So the later was placed in /home/user1/.myapplication as follows:

USER_HOME=$(eval echo ~${SUDO_USER})
echo "USER HOME IS  "  ${USER_HOME}

case "$1" in

  configure)
    mkdir -p "${USER_HOME}"/.myapplication
    echo "Creating tables needed for myapplication"
    sqlite3 "${USER_HOME}"/.myapplication/mydbfile.sqlite "${CREATE_TBL_MAIN}; ${CREATE_TBL_EVENTS}; ${CREATE_TABLE_ISSUES}; ${CREATE_TBL_PROBLEMS}"
    echo "Assigning myapplication.sqlite file to user " "${SUDO_USER}"
    chown -R "${SUDO_USER}":"${SUDO_USER}" "${USER_HOME}"/.myapplication/
  ;;

  abort-upgrade|abort-remove|abort-deconfigure)
        exit 0
  ;;

  *)
        echo "postinst called with unknown argument \`$1'" >&2
        exit 1
  ;;

esac

The installation of myapplication was taken care of within rules file through successive calls to install -m

Regarding dependencies, Tshepang was right, they should be declared in the control file. However, and I have not figured that out yet, in some cases (machines) they were automatically installed if they were missing and in others installation was aborted as soon as the dependent packages were missing.

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