Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If you need to return a struct from a function, you would normally return a pointer to the struct instead.

If you then want to return an array of structs, is it recommended to:

  1. return an array of structures (pointer to the first element)
  2. or return an array of struct pointers?

I have drawn a diagram for the two options below:

1:

enter image description here

2:

enter image description here

Given the following struct definition

struct values {
    int a;
    int b;
};

here is some sample code for accessing the fields of the structs from the two options:

Option #1:

 struct values *vals = get_values1();
 printf("%d, %d\n", values[0].a, values[1].b);

Option #2:

 struct values **vals = get_values2();
 printf("%d, %d\n", values[0]->a, values[1]->b);
share|improve this question
    
what is your doubt? –  Grijesh Chauhan Aug 1 '13 at 11:19
    
@GrijeshChauhan what is best? Does it even matter which I choose? –  Tyilo Aug 1 '13 at 11:19
2  
The only issue I see to not use version 1, is that it might be easier to identify the number of structures in the second version, as a NULL pointer can be used as a stopper element, whereas in the first version it might not be possible to define this stopper value. –  alk Aug 1 '13 at 11:21
    
@alk, yeah you're right about that :) –  Tyilo Aug 1 '13 at 11:23
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Unless you have a good reason to return a pointer to pointers (for example, if you want to modify the pointers themselves later on), I think a pointer to the struct is good enough. No need to trick around with double pointers.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The only issue I see to not use version 1, is that it might be easier to identify the number of structures (returned) in the second version, as a NULL pointer can be used as a stopper element, whereas in the first version it might not be possible to define a stopper element.

share|improve this answer
add comment

As an example for a beginners book on C, the question would clearly be satisfied better by option 1 (no indirection) as was pointed out by the answers so far. If there is more to the question however (e.g. which is the best way to pass around structs in a large framework) then I would certainly go for option 2. Why? structs are complex units of data and tend to become standalone entities which are allocated and passed around and disposed in differing ways - all code that handles them by direct access will need a rewrite if data handling becomes more complex.

share|improve this answer
add comment

For me, as the number of indirections grow, the code complexity grows even faster. Thus I prefer your Option #1: struct values *foo().

Should data requirements push toward #2: struct values **foo(), suggest creating a new type typedef struct values *ValuesSet and returning a pointer to that: ValuesSet *foo().

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.