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I am studying for the Java SE 7 exam and I am looking at sample questions. I cannot seem to figure out why the following program returns in the order x y c g.

I understand why the x is run first, because it is a static initialisation block but can someone please explain why y is run before c and g?

public class Triangle {
Triangle() {
    System.out.print("c ");
}

{
    System.out.print("y ");
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    new Triangle().go();
}

void go() {
    System.out.print("g ");
}

static {
    System.out.print("x ");
}
}
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marked as duplicate by jlordo, assylias, jason, eis, fedorqui Aug 1 '13 at 11:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@jlordo, yes you are correct. never found this question at all when searching it online –  theBigOzzy Aug 1 '13 at 11:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
{
    System.out.print("y ");
}

is an instance initialisation block and is run before the constructor. So the code is equivalent to:

Triangle() {
    System.out.print("y "); //initialisation block
    System.out.print("c ");
}
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so can you have more then one instance of an initialsation block in a class? if so do these run in a specific order? –  theBigOzzy Aug 1 '13 at 11:20
1  
@theBigOzzy yes you can and they run in the program order (i.e. in the order they appear in your code). It is defined in JLS #12.5, step 4: Execute the instance initializers and instance variable initializers for this class [...] in the left-to-right order in which they appear textually in the source code for the class –  assylias Aug 1 '13 at 11:20

Order will be static block:

static {
   System.out.print("x ");
}

Then instance initializer :

{
  System.out.print("y ");
}

which is implicitly :

Triangle() {
   System.out.print("y ");
   System.out.print("c ");
}

Read:

  1. Instance Initializers
  2. Creation of New Class Instances.
  3. Oracle tutorial.
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the "y" is inside a block statement, not in a method. Therefore the statements inside the block get executed when an instance of Triangle is created, even before the constructor.

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In memory first IIB and SIB get executed then your main function loaded into stack that's why you getting this output. As it name suggest IIB (intilised instance block) this is very important static is like free sailors which are floating on sea can be used by any class before main method get executed.

public class TestFirst

{
System.out.println(" From IIB");

}
static
{
    System.out.println("SIB ");
}

     public static void main(String   [] args){

System.out.println(" TestFirst ");

}

}
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..."static is like free sailors which are floating on sea"? what? –  eis Aug 1 '13 at 11:27
    
@Envious. Totally wrong. static blocks are executed after the class is loaded, not before it. And constructors are only executed, when an instance of class is created, not when the class is loaded. –  Rohit Jain Aug 1 '13 at 11:30
    
@eis there are many kind of static are there,do not mind if I have not clearly mentioned in reference to static.There are so many kind of static are there like variable,method can used by anyone means any Class that's why I have called free sailors and sea means our memory for pro-gramme –  Envious Aug 1 '13 at 11:36
    
@RohitJain yea you are right.I never wanted to say that may be I have mis-formated so I have deleted my comment because nothing can be loaded before loading the class,what I think when we invoke command :java test. then by Bootstrap class loader our class is loaded.If I am wrong correct me please. –  Envious Aug 1 '13 at 11:46
    
java test for only example I have taken. –  Envious Aug 1 '13 at 11:48

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