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Hello. I am having an build issues with a piece of code I am trying to execute. I am new to C++ and I am trying to get my head around it so the issue is probably something really simple. I'd really appreciate it of anyone could give me a hand. Here is the code;

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int i = 0;
char input = ' ';

int main()
{
    for(i = 1; i <= 100; ++i)
    {
        if((cin >> input) == 'a')
        {
            break;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

The issue is with the "if((cin >> input) == 'a')" there is something wrong with the operator '=='

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The problem is that (cin >> input) does not return something that is useful to compare with 'a'. –  juanchopanza Aug 1 '13 at 11:56
    
There is nothing wrong with it. You are comparing the result of operator>>() with 'a', and not input with 'a' –  StoryTeller Aug 1 '13 at 11:56
    
I'm sure you compiler has something interesting to say about this. Maybe you could start here. –  undu Aug 1 '13 at 12:18
    
@MikeSeymour, There is nothing wrong with operator==. –  StoryTeller Aug 1 '13 at 13:07
    
@MikeSeymour, to imply (as the OP has) that there is something wrong with the built in operator because one is using it improperly is ludicrous. It's not a problem with the operator, it's a problem with the OP. Please consider the context for comments. No need to teach me there is not an appropriate overload. –  StoryTeller Aug 1 '13 at 14:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The issue you have is that the expression cin >> input doesn't "return" the character typed, it returns cin as an istream& object.

The direct fix for you would be:

if( ( cin >> input ) && ( input == 'a' ) )
{
    break;
}

The reason for the check cin >> input is defensive: if for any reason an istream cannot read, it becomes invalid.

On a minor note, loops in C++ are conventionally zero based, and it's better to restrict the scope of your i variable:

for( int i = 0; i != 100; ++i )
share|improve this answer
    
The usual convention for the terminating condition is i < 100. –  Thomas Matthews Aug 1 '13 at 19:00
    
!= works for iterators as well as indexes, and imposes a certain discipline on range bounds programming. There's a wealth of stuff on this which, alas, is too much for a comment... jaggersoft.com/pubs/HowToWriteALoop.htm is a good start. –  SteveL Aug 1 '13 at 19:41
    
cheers guys for all your help –  user2099445 Aug 3 '13 at 18:45

the expression (cin >> input) returns a reference to cin, and this will never be equal to 'a'.

Change the loop like this:

for(i = 1; i <= 100; ++i)
{
    cin >> input;
    if( input == 'a')
    {
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

try

    for(i = 1; i <= 100; ++i)
    {
       cin >> input;
       if(input == 'a')
       {
          break;

        ...

instead. The iostream (cin) stores the input in input when theres a ; or endline ;)

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the operator >> doesn't return the character read, but a reference to the istream itself.

You have to do:

for(i = 1; i <= 100; ++i) {
    cin >> input;
    if (input == 'a') {
        break;
    }
}

You can also keep the condition if (cin >> input) to check if your istream is still in "good status", if it has read correctly, but I cannot possibly see how reading a char can make cin fail. It's anyway a good practice in all other cases where you have to read from an input stream.

Also using for(int i = 0; i < 100; ++i) instead of for(i = 1; i <= 100; ++i) is usually more useful (if for example you have to use i as an index for an array). Note also that you shouldn't define i outside the for loop: in C++, keep the variable scope as local as possible, it will protect you from many copy & paste errors.

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Just to propose another method to retrieve input data :

std::getline() allows you to retrieve what have been typed by the user including sentences and in a string object. So this solution tends to be more flexible.

string input;
getline(cin, input);
if(input == "a")
{
    break;
}
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