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HTML:

<div class="content">
    <div class="card">
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

.content {
    min-height: 350px;
    min-width: 320px;
    max-width: 350px;
    padding: 15px;
}

.card {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    background-color: black;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/aJhEF/1/

When examined with console, it shows that .content has functioning width and height. Then why does the child element, with its width and height being set to 100% not fill out its parent's width and height?

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You need to give it an explicit width/height, rather than only minimum and maximum values. –  RGraham Aug 1 '13 at 12:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Child elements don't inherit their parents min-height property

This is why the .card element has a height of 0

As far as width is concerned, .card does fill out it's parent's width.

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This seems like strange behaviour. Do you know why they don't inherit min-height property? –  styke Aug 1 '13 at 12:30
    
It does not fill out it's parent as long as the padding is there. Padding is extra space on the INSIDE of the parent element, therefore this extra space is non-filled space of the parent element. –  Parrotmaster Aug 1 '13 at 12:32
1  
@styke After some googling I found this post - :) –  Danield Aug 1 '13 at 12:37
    
@Danield thanks Daniel, the post you found contains a workaround too. Take care. –  styke Aug 1 '13 at 12:39

Danield is right.

You might solve this by using relative and absolute positions, combined with a negative margin (to compensate the padding):

.content {
    min-height: 350px;
    min-width: 320px;
    max-width: 350px;
    padding: 15px;
    position: relative;
}

.card {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    background-color: black;
    position: absolute;
    margin: -15px;
}
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Because you gave the parent a set padding. Remove padding: 15px; to fill out the div.

padding is extra space at the inside of the elements borders. If you want space around the outside, use margin.

You stated that you wanted your child to fill out the parent element, and since padding it is extra space on the inside of the parent element, the child will not fill out it's parent as long as the padding is there.

Edit: The reason you don't see the results you wanted is because you have your element a min-height and min-width instead of actual sizes. You need to give this element set size (be it pixels or %). This is due to the fact that your child element doesn't inherit the min and max width/height of it's parent.

See JSFiddle

share|improve this answer
    
The JSFiddle is without padding. Still does not work. –  styke Aug 1 '13 at 12:24
1  
I've noticed if you remove the min prefixes, it fills it out, sans padding. –  user1508519 Aug 1 '13 at 12:26
    
Elaborate on the -1? –  Parrotmaster Aug 1 '13 at 12:30

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