Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to get Guard to detect file system changes while I'm working with SASS files. I want them to be compiled to CSS. I don't want to interact with the terminal every time I make a change though. It should just happen automatically. Right now, I have to press enter at the terminal to get it to compile.

When I do gem query --loacl I get this:

coderay (1.0.9)
ffi (1.8.1)
formatador (0.2.4)
guard (1.8.0)
guard-sass (1.1.0)
listen (1.0.3)
lumberjack (1.0.3)
method_source (0.8.1)
pry (0.9.12.1)
rb-fsevent (0.9.3)
rb-inotify (0.9.0)
rb-kqueue (0.2.0)
sass (3.2.9, 3.2.8)
slop (3.4.4)
thor (0.18.1)

I should note that this will eventually be a guard init on a Samba share; the directory is not on my physical machine, but I am testing on my local hard drive.

To initialize the guard project, I did guard init and then guard on my 'Portfolio' directory. This my directory structure:

-- Portfolio
    -- sass
    -- css
    -- Guardfile (file)

And this is the contents of my guard file:

# A sample Guardfile
# More info at https://github.com/guard/guard#readme

guard 'sass', :input => 'sass', :output => 'css'

I read something about Ruby being compiled against libedit instead of readline. How can I check if this is the issue?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

It appears the issue was in fact that Ruby wasn't using readline. I am not a Ruby expert, so I don't know for sure if this was the issue or not. I did follow the directions here and installed the Ruby Version Manager (RVM) and reinstalled Ruby to version 1.9.3 (although I think I could have used the latest 2.0.0) and I reinstalled the guard and guard-sass gems and now my filesystem changes are being detected automatically.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.