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I'm trying to read a binary serialized object, I don't have the object definition/source for it. I took a peak into the file and saw property names, so I manually recreated the object (let's call it SomeDataFormat).

I ended up with this :

public class SomeDataFormat // 16 field
{
    public string Name{ get; set; }
    public int Country{ get; set; } 
    public string UserEmail{ get; set; }
    public bool IsCaptchaDisplayed{ get; set; }
    public bool IsForgotPasswordCaptchaDisplayed{ get; set; }
    public bool IsSaveChecked{ get; set; }
    public string SessionId{ get; set; } 
    public int SelectedLanguage{ get; set; } 
    public int SelectedUiCulture{ get; set; } 
    public int SecurityImageRefId{ get; set; } 
    public int LogOnId{ get; set; } 
    public bool BetaLogOn{ get; set; } 
    public int Amount{ get; set; }
    public int CurrencyTo{ get; set; }
    public int Delivery{ get; set; } 
    public bool displaySSN{ get; set; }
}   

Now I'm able to deserialize it like this :

BinaryFormatter formatter = new BinaryFormatter();  
formatter.AssemblyFormat = FormatterAssemblyStyle.Full; // original uses this       
formatter.TypeFormat = FormatterTypeStyle.TypesWhenNeeded; // this reduces size
FileStream readStream = new FileStream("data.dat", FileMode.Open);
SomeDataFormat data = (SomeDataFormat) formatter.Deserialize(readStream);

First suspicious thing is that only the 2 string (SessionId & UserEmail) has value in the deserialized data object. The other properties are null or just 0. This might be intended, but still, I suspect that something has gone wrone during the deserialization.

The second suspicious thing is if I reserialize this object, I end up with different file sizes. Original (695 bytes). Reserialized object is 698 bytes. So there is 3bytes difference. I should get the same file size as the original.

Taking a look at the original, and the new (reserialized) file:

The originally serialized file: (zoom) enter image description here The reserialized file: (zoom) enter image description here

As you can see, after the header section, the data appears to be in different order. For example, you can see that the email, and the sessionID is not at the same place.

UPDATE: Will warned me that the byte coming after the "PublicKeyToken=null" is also different. (03 <-> 05)

  • Q1: Why are the values are in different order in the two files?
  • Q2: Why is there extra 3 bytes compared the 2 serialized objects?
  • Q3: What am I missing? How could I do this?

Any help is appreciated.


Kind of related questions: 1 2 3

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1  
You should check that Data_reSerialized.dat will Deserialize and report what size it Serialize produces; i.e. what size is Data_reReSerialized.dat? –  Mark Hurd Aug 6 '13 at 13:40
1  
You mean what the size of Data_reReSerialized.dat when I deserialize it? I will report back with the results later today. –  Dominik Antal Aug 6 '13 at 13:42
1  
@MarkHurd I managed to reserialize the object, and now it's only 3 bytes bigger than it should be. I don't manipulate the data at all, something must be wrong in my object definiton, or I'm missing an option somewhere. I'll post pictures soon. –  Dominik Antal Aug 8 '13 at 14:57
1  
I assume you've looked at the first Related Question on the right: How to analyse contents of binary serialization stream? –  Mark Hurd Aug 9 '13 at 13:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+50

Why are the values are in different order in the two files?

That is because member order is not based on the declaration ordering. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/424c79hc.aspx

The GetMembers method does not return members in a particular order, such as alphabetical or declaration order. Your code must not depend on the order in which members are returned, because that order varies.

.

Why is there extra 3 bytes compared the 2 serialized objects?

First the TypeFormat 'TypesWhenNeeded' should actually be 'TypesAlways'. That is why there are so many differences. For example the 05 after '=null' becoming 03 is due to that.

Second you don't have the correct types. Looking at BinaryFormatter in ILSpy and the hex dump reveals that the members you marked as 'int' are actually 'string'.

public class SomeDataFormat // 16 field
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Country { get; set; } 
    public string UserEmail{ get; set; }
    public bool IsCaptchaDisplayed{ get; set; }
    public bool IsForgotPasswordCaptchaDisplayed{ get; set; }
    public bool IsSaveChecked{ get; set; }
    public string SessionId{ get; set; } 
    public string SelectedLanguage{ get; set; } 
    public string SelectedUiCulture{ get; set; } 
    public string SecurityImageRefId{ get; set; } 
    public string LogOnId{ get; set; } 
    public bool BetaLogOn{ get; set; } 
    public string Amount{ get; set; }
    public string CurrencyTo{ get; set; }
    public string Delivery{ get; set; } 
    public bool displaySSN{ get; set; }
}

What am I missing? How could I do this?

I don't see a way to do it with the given BinaryFormatter. You could decompile/reverse the way BinaryFormatter works.

share|improve this answer
    
Suddenly, everything works fine! Thank you so much! –  Dominik Antal Aug 12 '13 at 7:33

If I'm not mistaken the binary serializer dumps some information about the object type name and namespace. If these values differ from the original class type and your new "SomeDataFormat" it may explain the size difference.

Have you tried comparing the two files with a hex-editor?

share|improve this answer
    
That was the first thing to check. I was able to read the object variable names, so I created that class with those properties in it. Then I tried to deserialize it, when it complained about "cant convert int to bool" and stuff, so it actually told me what data type it's expecting. I corrected the types and then it deserialized just fine. –  Dominik Antal Aug 1 '13 at 14:53
    
I tinkered around with the binaryFormatter properties, and found out that I can exclude type information, which yields 698bytes at reserialization instead of the previous 672, so now there is only 3 extra bytes. Also, looking at the original and the new serialized objects in hex editor, I see that the data is in different order. I'll probably make some pictures. –  Dominik Antal Aug 8 '13 at 14:34
2  
pictures are good :) –  pdriegen Aug 8 '13 at 14:37
    
updated with pictures, and current progress. –  Dominik Antal Aug 8 '13 at 16:39

When you do the deserialization some thing will upcast just fine. For example

public class SomeClass()
{
   public short SomeProperty {get;set;}
}

will deserialize into

public class SomeClass()
{
   public long SomeProperty {get;set;}
}

But if you serialize the second SomeClass (i.e. the one with long) it will result in a different size that the serialization of SomeClass with a short. In this particular case 6 bytes.

Update:

Deserialize into a generic object and then use reflection to get at the types. You would probably have to do recursion and special handling for a complex object.

using (var fileStream = new FileStream("TestFormatter.dat", FileMode.Open))
        {
            var binaryFormatter = new BinaryFormatter();
            var myObject = binaryFormatter.Deserialize(fileStream);
            var objectProperties = myObject.GetType().GetProperties();
            foreach (var property in objectProperties)
            {
                var propertyTypeName = property.PropertyType.Name; //This will tell you the property Type Name. I.e. string, int64 (long)
            }                
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Can I assume that the deserialized file contains all field names used in the original object? Or the only non null, used field names got serialized into that file? Also, is there a way to know for sure what type is SomeProperty? –  Dominik Antal Aug 5 '13 at 8:52
1  
By default BinaryFormatter will include all fields even if they are null. Depending on how complex the object you could probably use reflection on the generic object graph. I'll update my answer with a bit on how to do that. –  cgotberg Aug 5 '13 at 16:52
    
I tried your reflection method, and it gave me the same types that I'm using right now. So I guess it means that I'm stuck. –  Dominik Antal Aug 8 '13 at 9:22
1  
I'm out of ideas. Maybe you can figure out a way to get your hands on the original object that was serialized. Do you end up with the same size issue if you just serialize the generic object. –  cgotberg Aug 8 '13 at 13:11
    
Thank you anyway. I updated the question btw :) –  Dominik Antal Aug 8 '13 at 16:57

The remaining discrepancies could be from missing attributes on your class. Try this:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack=1)]
public class SomeDataFormat // 16 field
{
   ...
share|improve this answer
    
Will solved the problem, however this was a good idea, thank you :) –  Dominik Antal Aug 12 '13 at 7:34

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