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I am trying to randomise a number of enum values without assigning the same enum value more than once.

For Example:

public class Strings {

   public enum String {HELLO, WORLD, HELLOWORLD, HELLOAGAIN};

     private static final List<Strings> VALUES =
          Collections.unmodifiableList(Arrays.asList(values()));
          private static final int SIZE = VALUES.size();
          private static final Random RANDOM = new Random();

          public static Strings randomString()  {
            return VALUES.get(RANDOM.nextInt(SIZE));
          }
        }
}

When I call this method from my main I would get an output of (or similar to):

HELLO
HELLO
HELLO
WORLD

I need to, once an enum value is outputed, it cannot be output again and if it is, throw an exception/error saying no values left.

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I agree with Rohit. Using Collections.shuffle() would be an easy solution to echo the enum values in random order and also with no duplicate. Sample code:

public class Strings {
    public enum Message { HELLO, WORLD, HELLOWORLD, HELLOAGAIN };

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Message> shuffled = Arrays.asList(Message.values());
        Collections.shuffle(shuffled);
        for (Message msg : shuffled) {
            System.out.println(msg);
        }
    }
}
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Well, each time you want a random value, you can shuffle your collection using Collections.shuffle(List<?>). Then remove and get the 1st element. That way, you won't get the duplicate. And yes, you should not use a unmodifiable list then. As you will modify it.

And please give some other name to your enum. String is already a class defined in Java API.

You can try this code:

class Strings {
     enum Test {HELLO, WORLD, HELLOWORLD, HELLOAGAIN};

     private static final List<Test> VALUES = new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList(Test.values()));

     public static Test randomString()  {
            Collections.shuffle(VALUES);
            return VALUES.remove(0);
     }
}
share|improve this answer

Why not insert each enum value into a map keyed by a random number? Have your randomString() traverse the map in key order. When it reaches the end of the map, it can indicate that no values are left.

@Jeff - okay :-) Here's something that demonstrates what I'm talking about. You only have to "shuffle" once and then use the results.

public class TestApp
{
    public enum Test {HELLO, WORLD, HELLOWORLD, HELLOAGAIN};

    public static void main( String[] args )
    {
        Map<Integer,String> map = new TreeMap<Integer,String>();

        Test[] tests = Test.values();
        Random random = new Random();

        for ( Test t : tests )
            map.put( random.nextInt(), t.name() );

        for ( Map.Entry<Integer,String> e : map.entrySet() ) 
            System.out.println( e.getValue() );
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You should expand upon this and show some example code. It's a good idea. –  asteri Aug 1 '13 at 15:10

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