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I was looking at a project in java and found a for loop which was written like below:

for(int i=1; i<a.length; i++)
{
    ...........
    ...........
    ...........
}

My question is: is it costly to calculate the a.length (here a is array name)? if no then how a.length is getting calculated internally (means how JVM make sure O(1) access to this)? Is is similar to:

int length = a.length;
for(int i=1; i<length; i++)
{
    ...........
    ...........
    ...........
}

i.e. like accessing a local variable's value inside the function. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
The time is a constant but its probably a tiny bit slower than storing the length in a stack variable. I suspect this because the JVM has to go to the array and then get the length. But it doesn't scan the array elements and count them. – Lee Meador Aug 1 '13 at 15:34
    
see stackoverflow.com/questions/5950155/… – Shoe Aug 1 '13 at 15:34
    
a.length is not getting "calculated", it's a final field. – arshajii Aug 1 '13 at 15:45
up vote 7 down vote accepted

My question is: is it costly to calculate the a.length

No. It's just a field on the array (see JLS section 10.7). It's not costly, and the JVM knows it will never change and can optimize loops appropriately. (Indeed, I would expect a good JIT to notice the normal pattern of initializing a variable with a non-negative number, check that it's less than length and then access the array - if it notices that, it can remove the array boundary check.)

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It's just a field on the array. what does this mean? array is not a container which will have a field. can you please explain? thanks for your effort. – Trying Aug 1 '13 at 15:46
1  
@Trying Have you opened the link and read the second line? – assylias Aug 1 '13 at 15:46
    
@assylias ya. and have doubt in the line The array's length is available as a final instance variable length. How come this is handled is my doubt. thanks. – Trying Aug 1 '13 at 15:48
1  
@Trying: What do you mean by "how come this is handled"? When you say "array is not a container" - um, it's an object which has a final field called length. What do you mean by "array is not a container"? – Jon Skeet Aug 1 '13 at 15:52
1  
@Trying: a is a reference to an object, which is an instance of the int[] class. I think you've got some fundamental misconceptions about arrays. I suggest you read docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/arrays.html – Jon Skeet Aug 1 '13 at 15:57

a.length is not a calculation but merely an access to a field held within the array. That type of read operation is super fast.

If the code is part of a method which is called often enough, it is almost certain that the JIT compiler will do the optimisation you propose to make it even faster.

The potential speed difference is in nanoseconds here (probably without an "s").

share|improve this answer
2  
Run it through jmh :) – Marko Topolnik Aug 1 '13 at 15:45
2  
I've run it, and your estimate was almost correct: it's with "s", namely zero nanoseconds :) – Marko Topolnik Aug 1 '13 at 16:07
    
@MarkoTopolnik my comment was on performance before JIT! I think there is an option somewhere to prevent compilation if you feel bored! – assylias Aug 1 '13 at 16:32
    
You're guessing right, I do feel bored :) With -Xint, the story is quite different: 6.75 ops/msec (cache in local variable) vs. 4.94 ops/msec (fetch .length every time). – Marko Topolnik Aug 1 '13 at 18:20
1  
Ufff... I know what you mean. That tool eats time like it was peanuts. You waste 5 minutes on a full run, only to notice a fatal flaw in your code. Then repeat that 20 times... – Marko Topolnik Aug 1 '13 at 18:46

For your convenience, I've microbenchmarked it. The code:

public class ArrayLength
{
  static final boolean[] ary = new boolean[10_000_000];
  static final Random rnd = new Random();
  @GenerateMicroBenchmark public void everyTime() {
    int sum = rnd.nextInt();
    for (int i = 0; i < ary.length; i++) sum += sum;
  }
  @GenerateMicroBenchmark public void justOnce() {
    int sum = rnd.nextInt();
    final int length = ary.length;
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) sum += sum;
  }
}

The results:

Benchmark                     Mode Thr    Cnt  Sec         Mean   Mean error    Units
o.s.ArrayLength.everyTime    thrpt   1      3    5    40215.790     1490.800 ops/msec
o.s.ArrayLength.justOnce     thrpt   1      3    5    40231.192      966.007 ops/msec

Summary: no detectable change.

share|improve this answer
    
@MarkoTopolnik appreciate the effort. Thanks. +1. – Trying Aug 1 '13 at 17:48

in java arrays are fixed. Once you declare it you can not change that array's size in memory (if you tried to change the array size it will make a new array in memory).

Because of this we get O(1) length lookup. As we know the total size in memory of the array. If we also look up the size in memory of the first index we can do a quick calculation to get length at O(1) speed. As no matter how big our array is, its going take the same amount of time to lookup the size in memory and lookup the first index's size

share|improve this answer

In an array, length is not a function as in List.size(). When you create an array in java, its length is a constant. So the cost is minimal

share|improve this answer
    
list.size() is a simple getter for most list implementations. – assylias Aug 1 '13 at 15:36

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