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I was experimenting with vectors of pointers and came across the following behavior which I don't quite understand:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::vector<int*> vec;

    int* p1 = new int;
    *p1 = 100;

    vec.push_back(p1);  
    std::cout << *vec[0] << std::endl;

    delete p1;
    std::cout << *vec[0] << std::endl;

    int* p2 = new int;
    *p2 = 200;

    std::cout << *vec[0] << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Using the MinGW C++ compiler (g++), this gave me the following output:

100
5640648
200

Now of course the actual element vec[0] was not erased when deleting the pointer, but note that p2 is not inserted in the vector at all. Still, printing the value of the first element returns the value of this seemingly unrelated pointer! Also, restructuring the code a little bit so that p2 is declared before deleting p1 does not yield this behavior.

Just to make sure, I also compiled this with MSVC++, which gave me the following (expected) output:

100
5484120
5484120

Does anyone have an explanation for the first output?

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2  
Why is this behaviour unexpected? You do something that is undefined, after all :) The different outputs are likely related to the way the compilers map the memory. Did you compare the bytecodes? –  Gnosophilon Aug 1 '13 at 16:29
    
This question is somewhat useful if only because it shows at the end of the day, its machine code that sometimes does interesting things if you do blatant, variable-boundary-jumping stuff at the language level. –  Jim Aug 1 '13 at 17:57
    
Although I have already accepted an answer, I would still like to encourage anyone who can provide more in-depth information about this specific behavior to post their answer. –  mhj Aug 1 '13 at 22:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It reallocated the space held by p1, which vec[0] was still pointing to, hence the 200 value that showed up.

As you have noticed, this was the behavior of one compiler, and another compiler acted differently. You may have other behaviors based on different optimization switches as well. So overall, the behavior is undefined, though we can sometimes figure out what happened in particular cases.

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Do you mean that in the sense that the address of p1 and the address of p2 are equal? Because that does not seem to be the case when I look at them. If p2 actually replaced p1 at the same location in memory then the 200 value would make sense to me. –  mhj Aug 1 '13 at 17:47
    
Yes, that's what I was thinking. Since there's a vector involved, there might be another level of indirection in there somewhere. How could it have replaced it? You didn't do another pushback. –  Jim Aug 1 '13 at 17:55
    
Accept this answer if you like it. –  Jim Aug 1 '13 at 21:29
    
@Jim always give this link. syntax is: [text to displace](url of link) –  Grijesh Chauhan Aug 1 '13 at 21:36

because after delete you access the memory it causes undefined behavior:

delete p1;
std::cout << *vec[0] << std::endl;  <-- Buggy code

undefined behavior: - No guaranty how it will work

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1  
Undefined behavior –  Grijesh Chauhan Aug 1 '13 at 16:36
    
Fair enough. But then why is it that if p2 would be declared before invoking delete p1 the value of *vec[0] becomes something different? Something must be going on behind the scenes that causes the undefined behavior to change for both cases. –  mhj Aug 1 '13 at 17:59
1  
@mhj Undefined behavior means we can predict how program will behave at run time, declaring p2 before delete p1 doesn't make sense just code behaving differently because different sequences of instructions at low level. The problem is you can't access a memory the is deleted that I marked buggy code in your program. –  Grijesh Chauhan Aug 1 '13 at 18:23
    
@mhj after delete p1; if you accesses the memory location, it will be a memory access violation that may be detected by runtime system an cause terminate your program. –  Grijesh Chauhan Aug 1 '13 at 18:31
    
This isn't really an explanation of why the first instance happened. It is more of a (correct) statement that no explanation is required, as it is undefined behavior. –  Jim Aug 1 '13 at 19:46

Do you understand why this is undefined behaviour in the first place?

The value of vec[0] is p1. As soon as you delete p1; it becomes illegal to dereference vec[0]. vec[0] is just a copy of your pointer p1.

Imagine that the value of p1 is (the address) 953241, which is returned by new for you to use freely. The int value that you store in that address is 100. But once you delete p1, you renounce to any rights concerning that address. You effectively give it back to the system. You can't read from it anymore.

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When you delete p1, C++ frees up the space that p1 was taking up on the heap and lets it be used for other data. So when you create p2, it puts it there because it's the next spot in memory it wants to use.

vec[0] still points there only because the data from your pointer is still there on the stack. (C++ doesn't know you deleted the pointer was there, but the pointer data doesn't go anywhere, so you can sill access it. It'll be replaced the next time you do anything on the stack.)

I'm guessing that MSVC++ purposefully tries not to use recently freed memory space because it's "safer" - if you deleted something by accident and then overwrote it, it's gone forever.

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delete p1;
std::cout << *vec[0] << std::endl; // (1.)

int* p2 = new int;
*p2 = 200;

std::cout << *vec[0] << std::endl; // (2.)

return 0;
  1. you deleted the memory so it is not defined what will be at this address.
  2. in the g++ output you see that the new value 200 is displayed, this is because it is at the adress of the

    int* p1 = new int;
    *p1 = 100;
    

    code, don't use the value because the behavior is implemention specific and it shows only up because you don't allocate anything earlier that can fit in the freed memory place.

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