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So after pulling my hair out for 30 minutes, I have decided to come to SO for some help on this problem:

The sum of the primes below 10 is 2 + 3 + 5 + 7 = 17.

Find the sum of all the primes below two million.

Now, I don't want to know how to do the problem - that's easy - and especially not the answer. I would like to know why my code isn't giving me the correct answer when I run it (C#):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public class Euler010 {
    public static bool isPrime(Int64 n) {
        if (n <= 1)
            return false;
        if (n < 4)
            return true;
        if (n % 2 == 0)
            return false;
        if (n < 9)
            return true;
        if (n % 3 == 0)
            return false;

        Int64 r = (Int64)Math.Floor(Math.Sqrt((double)n));
        Int64 f = 5;
        while (f <= 4) {
            if (n % f == 0)
                return false;
            if (n % (f + 2) == 0)
                return false;
            f += 6;
        }
        return true;
    }


    public static void Main() {
        Int64 sum = 2;
        for (Int64 n = 3; n <= 2000000; n+=2) {
            if (isPrime(n)) {
                sum += n;
            }
        }

        Console.WriteLine(sum);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

When run to n <= 10, it outputs 17, like it should. When run to anything that's easy to compute by hand, it outputs the correct answer (like n <= 20 -> 77).

However, when I run this, it outputs 666667333337 which is wrong.

Any ideas?

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Do you really mean "Int64 f=5; while (f<=4) {" ? That seems like a while loop that isn't going to do anything. –  Eric Nov 25 '09 at 21:23
    
FYI, there are lots of neat shortcuts when testing numbers for primes. One that I like is this -- after 2 and 3, you only need to check numbers having the form: (6n -1) and (6n +1), starting with n=1. –  dan Nov 25 '09 at 21:29
1  
Why not calculate it directly? Let's see, the sum of all integers is n * (n + 1) / 2...subtract composite multiples of two... n(n+1)/(2p)-p...um.... I'll leave the rest as an excersize. :-) –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Nov 25 '09 at 21:31
    
This is an interesting solution. Very different from mine(on github), I used the sieve of eratosthenes as the basis for finding all primes. Blogged about it here –  gideon Mar 9 '12 at 16:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
        Int64 f = 5;
        while (f <= 4) {

Maybe I'm missing something here but these two lines don't seem to make sense. I'm fairly certain that the code posted above will never execute the body of the while loop.

Perhaps you meant to check if f is less than the square root of r?

share|improve this answer
    
DOH! Thanks for that. This is what happens with small keyboards... –  Austin Hyde Nov 25 '09 at 21:23

You're not using the variable r in your loop, I assume you probably want to loop while f<=r?

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Not what you are looking for, but you should probably use something like Sieve of Eratosthenes to generate your primes.

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Plus the existing tests catch all non-primes below 20 (divisible by 2, 3, etc).

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