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Perhaps I've been spoiled by Ruby, but it seems to me that if I have two functions that use the same basic logic (but varying details), I should only have to write the logic out once -- and as a consequence, I should only have to maintain the code in one place.

Here is the basic logic, which I re-use in a number of different functions. The parts that change are labeled A, B, C, D, E, and F.

  if (recursions) {
    while (lcurr || rcurr) {

      if (!rcurr || (lcurr && (lcurr->key < rcurr->key))) {
        // A
        lcurr   = lcurr->next;
      } else if (!lcurr || (rcurr && (rcurr->key < lcurr->key))) {
        // B
        rcurr   = rcurr->next;
      } else { // keys are == and both present
        // C
        lcurr   = lcurr->next;
        rcurr   = rcurr->next;
      }
    }
  } else {
    while (lcurr || rcurr) {
      if (!rcurr || (lcurr && (lcurr->key < rcurr->key))) {
        // D
        lcurr         = lcurr->next;
      } else if (!lcurr || (rcurr && (rcurr->key < lcurr->key))) {
        // E
        rcurr         = rcurr->next;
      } else { // keys == and both left and right nodes present
        // F
        lcurr         = lcurr->next;
        rcurr         = rcurr->next;
      }
    }
  }

The return values of the functions may be different, too. I'd like to be able to have additional logic as well in various places, if possible.

I realize that this can be done by way of C macros, but they don't seem particularly maintainable. I also realize that if my matrix type used nested STL lists, this might be easier. But is there any functionality in C++11 (or old C++) that allows this logic to be written only once? Could one do this with lambdas, perhaps?

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6  
What are the details that differ? It's a bit hard to spot them... Can't you write some smaller examples? –  jrok Aug 1 '13 at 18:29
3  
Haven't checked the whole logic, but reinterpret_cast is almost always wrong. Also, I don't know what you are doing, but it seems overly complicated... can you describe in plain words what your algorithm does? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 1 '13 at 18:30
    
What I noticed is that you don't seem to use left and right anywhere other than to pass them down recursively. –  jrok Aug 1 '13 at 18:32
2  
There is a method. Write function and function templates. Inside, call other (or same) functions and function templates. Basically, the same thing you would do in Ruby. Have you tried that? If yes, what went wrong? –  n.m. Aug 1 '13 at 18:35
    
Seems to me that this is a case for use enumerators with yield, as in C#. Unfortunately you're not using C#. –  John Henckel Aug 1 '13 at 18:44

3 Answers 3

The way I've seen this done is to write callback functions. So you would write the logic part once, much like you have in your second text block. You would also define functions A, B, C, D, E, and F.

In your logic function, you would pass in both the parameters required and pointers to the callback functions. Then, in the logic function, you would call these callbacks and pass them the parameters they need.

Quite honestly, this seems like it would be more work in the end. You would maintain a single point of truth for your logic, but function pointers can be a massive pain and reduce the readability of your code.

For the sake of providing as much information as possible, an example:

int addTwoNumbers(int a, int b) { //A simple adding function
   return a + b; 
}

int subtractTwoNumbers(int a, int b) { //A simple subtracting function
    return a - b;
}

/*
 * This is the fun one. The first argument is a pointer to a function. The other 
 * arguments are the numbers to do math with. They aren't as important.
 * The important part is that, so long as the function declaration matches the one here
 * (so a function that returns an int and takes in two ints as arguments) it can be
 * used by this function
 */
void math(int (*mathFunc)(int, int), int one, int two) {
    cout << *mathFunc(one, two);
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    int whichMath = 0; //Assume 1 is add, 2 is subtract
    if(whichMath == 1) {
        math(&addTwoNumbers, 5, 6); //we're going to add 5 and 6
    } else {
        math(&subtractTwoNumbers, 5, 6); // we're going to subtract 5 and 6
    }
}

If that makes NO sense, then you are welcome to join the legions of us who struggle with function pointers. Again, I would say that you should just write the two separate functions, as you can see how ugly this will get.

As a disclaimer, I have not compiled this code. I'm at work and there is no c++ compiler on these machines.

I have used this site heavily in the past for reference on function pointers: http://www.newty.de/fpt/fpt.html#defi

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2  
Use a template argument instead of function pointers. –  Alexandre C. Aug 1 '13 at 18:50
1  
My classes never covered Templates in depth. Can you expand on that? It would probably help out OP, and I'd love to learn from it too. –  TylerLubeck Aug 1 '13 at 18:52
1  
...or at least use a lambda. –  T.E.D. Aug 1 '13 at 18:58
    
... or std::function<int (int, int)> - It's still kind of ugly though... en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/functional/function –  user451498 Aug 2 '13 at 4:18

Well, one solution is to yank out the bit of redundant code and put it into a template, such as

  template<T1, T2, T3>
  bool TESTKEYS(T1 lcurr, T2 rcurr, T3 actor)
  {
    while (lcurr || rcurr) {
      if (!rcurr || (lcurr && (lcurr->key < rcurr->key))) {
        if (actor.TestLeft(....)) return false;
        lcurr         = lcurr->next;
      } else if (!lcurr || (rcurr && (rcurr->key < lcurr->key))) {
        if (actor.TestRight(....)) return false;
        rcurr         = rcurr->next;
      } else { // keys == and both left and right nodes present
        if (actor.TestBoth(....)) return false;
        lcurr         = lcurr->next;
        rcurr         = rcurr->next;
      }
    }
    return true;
  }

You will need to decide for yourself what parameters to use for the TestLeft, etc.

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What if the functions with similar logic aren't returning the same types? eqeq_r returns false, but merge_r is void. I suppose it might be possible to return LDType or RDType too. –  mohawkjohn Aug 1 '13 at 20:28
template<typename A, typename B, typename C>
void compute (/*some parameters */)
{
   if (recursions) {
     while (lcurr || rcurr) {
       if (!rcurr || (lcurr && (lcurr->key < rcurr->key))) {
         auto aResult = A (lcurr, rcurr);
        lcurr   = lcurr->next;
       } else if (!lcurr || (rcurr && (rcurr->key < lcurr->key))) {
        auto bResult = B (lcurr, rcurr);
       } // ... and so on
       C (aResult, bResult);
    } // ... etc
} 

To call compute you need to write classes you want to pass down in place of your A to F placeholder. The actual work is done in the operator() member function of each class.

class A1 {
  public:
    double operator() (SomeType t1, SomeType t2) {
      // do work
    }
};

class A2 {
  public:
    int operator() (SomeType t1, SomeType t2) {
      // do work
    }
};

class B1 {
  public:
    char* operator() (SomeType t1, SomeType t2) {
      // do work
    }
};

class B2 {
  public:
    SomeClass* operator() (SomeType t1, SomeType t2) {
      // do work
    }
};

class C1 {
  public:
    int operator() (double t1, char* t2) {
}

class C2 {
  public:
    int operator() (int t1, SomeClass* t2) {
}

compute<A1, B1, C1>(whatever);
compute<A2, B2, C2>(whatever);

Note how A1 and B1 return types match C1 arguments, and similarly for A2, B2 and C2.

auto requires C++11, if you cannot use it, you will have to do a little additional work:

class A1 {
  public:
    typedef double result_type;
    double operator() (SomeType t1, SomeType t2) {
      // do work
    }
};

and inside compute

             typename A::result_type aResult = A (lcurr, rcurr);
share|improve this answer
    
Ahh! Thanks for this. Interesting. –  mohawkjohn Aug 2 '13 at 15:44
    
Can one use an std::function instead of functors? –  mohawkjohn Aug 2 '13 at 15:51
    
Yes but you will have to pass std::functions as normal function parameters in addition of passing their types as template parameters. –  n.m. Aug 2 '13 at 15:56
    
std::function can't be passed as a template param? –  mohawkjohn Aug 2 '13 at 17:35
1  
No, it cannot. Its type can, but the function itself cannot. –  n.m. Aug 2 '13 at 17:43

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