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First off I'd like to make perfectly clear that my knowledge of Access and VBA is extremely limited at best. I have an employee database system that due to it's age has been prone to small data corruption issues and controls breaking due to differences between 2003/2007 and 2010. While I've managed to hash out the bulk of the problems, one that has me especially concered is the script we're using to manage access to the database. The system is split between two files, a frontend where users can access the database and a backend file that contains all of the tables.

The issue I have is in the frontend form that handles the logon for the users. The way the access system is set up is the user enters their SSN, then the script finds their SSN in the table and if it exists looks if an access checkbox is checked. If they have access, they're directed to the main menu, if not they get a denied message. What I've found though is for some reason or another, if an entry in the personnel table has an incomplete SSN, the script breaks and anyone can gain access to the database.

There's a query that runs in the frontend that looks at the master personnel table and pulls just the first two columns, SSAN and Access.

The form itself has a visible text box, "Text8", and a hidden Combo Box "Combo4". Combo4 uses the previously mentioned query for the row source (SELECT qryAccess.SSAN FROM qryAccess;), while Text8 is where the user enters their SSN.

Here's the code right now:

Option Compare Database

Private Sub Combo4_AfterUpdate()
    ' Find the record that matches the control.
    Dim rs As Object

    Set rs = Me.Recordset.Clone
    rs.FindFirst "[SSAN] = '" & Me![Combo4] & "'"
    If Not rs.EOF Then Me.Bookmark = rs.Bookmark

    If Me![Access] = True Then
    DoCmd.RunMacro "Access"
    Else
    DoCmd.OpenForm "frmDenied"
    End If
End Sub

Private Sub Text8_AfterUpdate()
Me![Combo4] = Me![Text8]

    ' Find the record that matches the control.
    Dim rs As Object

    Set rs = Me.Recordset.Clone
    rs.FindFirst "[SSAN] = '" & Me![Combo4] & "'"
    If Not rs.EOF Then Me.Bookmark = rs.Bookmark

    If Me![Access] = True Then
    DoCmd.RunMacro "Access"
    Else
    DoCmd.OpenForm "frmDenied"
    End If
End Sub

Like I said before, as long as every entry for the SSNs is a full 9-digits, this system works. However, if for some reason the entry is not the full 9 like I just found in my database (and no, I have no idea what caused that to happen, there is an input mask in place, 000-00-0000;;_), this system breaks. You could type in "abc" for the SSN and gain access to the database.

How can I write a small script that pre-checks the table for SSN entries that don't fit the 9-digit format that is set, and if it finds them, resets them to an unused number, such as 000000000, 000000001, etc?

Also, if you have any suggestions on how to streamline the existing code, I'd be more than happy to take them.

share|improve this question
    
It wouldn't have to correct them to whatever that person's SSN is, it would just have to create a valid entry. For example, if the SSN field showed "123", it would just have to reset that field to show "000000001" or whatever the next incremental unique number would be. –  Chaosbydesign Aug 1 '13 at 19:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Add this function to you application

Public Function IsValidSSN(ByVal SSN As String) As Boolean

'Determines if SSN is a valid social security number
'requires SSN to be in either "#########" or "###-##-####" format

        IsValidSSN = (SSN Like "###-##-####") Or _
            SSN Like ("#########")

End Function

Also change your function to this:

Private Sub Combo4_AfterUpdate()
    ' Find the record that matches the control.
  If IsValidSSN(Me![Combo4]) Then  
    Dim rs As Object

    Set rs = Me.Recordset.Clone
    rs.FindFirst "[SSAN] = '" & Me![Combo4] & "'"
    If Not rs.EOF Then Me.Bookmark = rs.Bookmark

    If Me![Access] = True Then
    DoCmd.RunMacro "Access"
    Else
    DoCmd.OpenForm "frmDenied"
    End If
  Else
    DoCmd.OpenForm "frmDenied"
  End IF
End Sub

Private Sub Text8_AfterUpdate()
    Me![Combo4] = Me![Text8]

 If IsValidSSN(Me![Text8]) Then 
    ' Find the record that matches the control.
    Dim rs As Object

    Set rs = Me.Recordset.Clone
    rs.FindFirst "[SSAN] = '" & Me![Combo4] & "'"
    If Not rs.EOF Then Me.Bookmark = rs.Bookmark

    If Me![Access] = True Then
    DoCmd.RunMacro "Access"
    Else
    DoCmd.OpenForm "frmDenied"
    End If
  Else
    DoCmd.OpenForm "frmDenied"
  End If
End Sub

EDIT

Also why are you using a combobox to enter a SSN? You can use input mask on text box. Also I would highly suggest that you convert your system to some other identification other than SSN because it is easily passable to get past this code to look at the table containing everyones SSN, by holding down shift when opening the application. As for streamlining your code just remove that combobox altogether. If they are typing it into a textbox there is no need to put it into a hidden combobox.

share|improve this answer
    
The text box Text8 is where the users are entering the SSN with the appropriate password mask, not the combo box. Why the combo box is there is beyond me. And yes that shift trick is exactly how I'm getting at the code to fix everything. Luckily the majority of the users are not computer-savvy enough to know that bypass or how to make use of it. Would there be a way for the script to query the personnel table directly without exposing the list of SSNs that have access to a frontend user that used the shift bypass? –  Chaosbydesign Aug 1 '13 at 19:31
    
@Chaosbydesign Unfortunately the only real way to hide SSN and should be done is to hide it with hashing. The when the user enters one, hash it and compare hashes. Hashes are one way function. –  ObieMD5 Aug 1 '13 at 19:48
1  
@Chaosbydesign also you are potentially opening your self up to lawsuit or somethung if those SSN get stolen. I think they may fall under Personal Identification Information (PII) –  ObieMD5 Aug 1 '13 at 19:51
    
Believe me, in my line of work I know all too much about the protection of PII, however due to the nature of the work I do using the SSN as the access control and primary key in the personnel table is the only thing we can do maintain the database structure. –  Chaosbydesign Aug 1 '13 at 20:12
    
@Chaosbydesign I'm not saying dont use the SSN just dont store it in plain text. If you hash it it will still be a unique primary key. –  ObieMD5 Aug 1 '13 at 20:23

You have a text field, SSAN, and with that input mask the dashes are not included in the stored values. So valid values would be 9 digit strings.

If that is correct, you can use a query to identify any invalid stored values.

SELECT y.SSAN, Len(SSAN) AS LenghtOfSSAN
FROM YourTable AS y
WHERE Len(SSAN)<>9 OR y.SSAN ALike '%[!0-9]%';

That query will return rows where SSAN includes < or > 9 characters, and any values which include characters other than digits.

Note the ALike keyword tells the db engine to expect ANSI wild card characters.  If you prefer Access' * wild card instead, change it to Like '*[!0-9]*'

Once you fix the stored values, add a Validation rule for that SSAN field (Like "#########") to require all values consist of 9 digits.

share|improve this answer
    
There are only 550 entries in the table, so finding and manually correcting the 6 invalid ones was pretty easy to do. How could I take that and then rewrite all of those entries to be a valid unique number? Thanks for the tip on the validation rule, I just looked in the master table and saw there was none set. –  Chaosbydesign Aug 1 '13 at 19:35
    
Yes, I put that into play immediately on the production copy of the database backend. –  Chaosbydesign Aug 1 '13 at 19:40

Since it looks like this became more of a "How do I find the user" than "How do I fix the existing entries", let me throw my hat into the ring.

Unless I completely misunderstand this, the existing (and accepted answer) function is HORRIBLE. You can do this all much more efficiently and with less code. First of all, delete Combo4. No need for it. Then do this:

Private Sub Text8_AfterUpdate()
Dim X as Integer

X = DLookup("Access", "qryAccess", "SSAN = '" & Me!Text8 & "'")

    If Nz(X) = True Then
    DoCmd.RunMacro "Access"
    Else
    DoCmd.OpenForm "frmDenied"
    End If
End Sub

That's all you need. If the user's SSN was stored incorrectly, he's gonna be denied. 7 digits, 8 digits, doesn't make a difference. Only exact matches get through. That is, assuming 0 = False and 1 = True, which should be the default anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, I'm not going to lie to you, this whole thing was coded probably 8 or 9 years ago in Access 2003. I don't know any better unless someone tells me, because I have hardly any idea what it is I'm looking at. Also, while I like the streamlined approach here, your code is throwing a Run-time error '94': Invalid use of Null –  Chaosbydesign Aug 1 '13 at 21:31
    
Probably needs a little tweakin', I kind of "air-coded" it. You probably have to change "If Nz(X) = True Then" to "If Nz(X) = 1 Then", or something like that. The Nz() function changes anything that's NULL to 0 by default, so you probably can't have 0 = True. Just guessing. If you could put a breakpoint in the code and let me know what it thinks X is equal to, that would help me diagnose it. –  Johnny Bones Aug 1 '13 at 23:41
    
After thinking about this for a bit, it depends on what Data Type the field "Access" is. I assumed it was an Integer (which is why I Dim'd X as an Integer), but if it's Yes/No then that would probably throw an error. Like I said, it probably needs to be tweaked a little but not all that much. Also, "Me!Text8" may need to be changed to "Me![Text8]" or "Me!Text8.Text" or something. Put a breakpoint on the first line of code, and when the code breaks just step through it (hitting the F8 key). At each step, hover your mouse over any variables and make sure they are equal to what you expect. –  Johnny Bones Aug 2 '13 at 4:18

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