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A = {
   name: 'Class A',
   sayMyName: function() {
      console.log(this.name);
   }
};

B = {
   name: 'Class B', 
   sayMyName: A.sayMyName
};

B.sayMyName();  // Logs 'Class B'

I understand the concept that the scope has not changed, you're assigning an actual function to another class.

How can I get B's sayMyName to execute A's sayMyName and have this refer to A?

UPDATE: Explanation

The reason for this is we have multiple layers: controller, bll, repository and in some cases there is no BLL logic to do, we just end up passing parameters like this:

SomeBLL = {
   readById: function(id, includes, callback) {
       SomeRepo.readById(id, includes, callback);
   }
};

If the parameters were to change (more likely with a create) then it would be easier not to edit the BLL which, as of right now, is doing nothing.

I figured if it could just pass on the call to the repository layer instead, that would make for less maintenance. Controller always has to access the BLL though so that if we do want to add logic down the road we can add it in the right place without changing the controller.

Our original solution was:

SomeBLL = {
    readById: SomeRepo.readById
};

However the context hasn't changed and this refers to SomeBLL instead of SomeRepo when we work in the repository layer.

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Could you post a snippet of code that is complete enough to actually answer your question? What is b.logMe()? –  itcouldevenbeaboat Aug 1 '13 at 18:54
    
@itcouldevenbeaboat he probably meant b.sayMyName() –  alfasin Aug 1 '13 at 19:01
    
Oh in that case it is a fine question indeed –  itcouldevenbeaboat Aug 1 '13 at 19:09
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4 Answers

If I understood your question correctly - you can do:

A = {
   name: 'Class A',
   sayMyName: function() {
      console.log(A.name);
   }
};

Now it doesn't matter who's calling sayMyName - it'll always print Class A.

Another option:

A = {
   name: 'Class A',   
   sayMyName: function(obj) {
      console.log(obj.name);
   }
};

and then either define B like this:

B = {
   name: 'Class B', 
   sayMyName: function(){A.sayMyName(A);}
};

B.sayMyName();

or call: B.sayMyName(A)

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I just updated the code so that it works. I do see that A.name would work... I was hoping to avoid doing that but I guess it's the only solution? –  user2643331 Aug 1 '13 at 19:02
    
I'm not sure I understand what you're looking for - what are you trying to achieve? –  alfasin Aug 1 '13 at 19:04
    
See the update in the question for the explanation. –  user2643331 Aug 1 '13 at 21:45
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Rather than referencing a function, you could call it within another anonymous function.

B = {
   name: 'Class B', 
   sayMyName: function () {
     A.sayMyName();
   }
};
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add comment
B.sayMyName.call(A) 

should do the work, just I dont understand why you need this kind of code? If you explain your problem, there can be more solid solution

share|improve this answer
    
See the update in the question for the explanation. –  user2643331 Aug 1 '13 at 21:46
add comment
SomeBLL = {
    readById: SomeRepo.readById
};

However the context hasn't changed and this refers to SomeBLL instead of SomeRepo when we work in the repository layer.

A universal function that doesn't need changes to its parameters would be

… = function() {
    return SomeRepo.readById.apply(SomeRepo, arguments);
}

using the arguments object and apply. However, there's a shorter solution to fix this: the bind Function method, though it needs shimming in older browsers:

SomeBLL = {
    readById: SomeRepo.readById.bind(SomeRepo)
};
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