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We are working to integrate a step into our continuous integration (CI) server (CruiseControl.NET). We want to register the debug symbols *.pdb generated from our build process into a Microsoft Symbol Server. As implemented by Microsoft, a symbol server is a directory structure Visual Studio uses to find the *.pdb debug symbols for C++/C# executables. Microsoft provides a command symstore that takes debug symbols in one directory and populates the central symbol store directory as appropriate.

The trouble is symstore explicitly states it is not safe to run concurrently.

What approaches or strategies can we try to prohibit the concurrent execution of the symstore command via BATCH or Powershell scripts?

We are flexible on approach, but because we run on a Windows platform, BATCH and Powershell are preferred solutions.

Clarification:

For our use-case, symstore needs to be runnable from two different CI servers which will save the symbols on a common network drive.

Resources:

symstore:: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms681417(v=vs.85).aspx

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2  
Do you need to run symstore on the same computer across different processes? Or do you need to run symstore on different computers, managing a symbol store on a central computer? – Aaron Jensen Aug 1 '13 at 20:15
    
Using TFS and its build process templates, it is possible to synchronize access to the symbol store. See "The SharedResourceScope Activity" here: blogs.msdn.com/b/adamroot/archive/2009/06/17/… – M.A. Hanin Aug 1 '13 at 22:49
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use a locked file as a simple semaphore to serialize events. When you redirect stdout to a file in a batch file, it establishes an exclusive write lock on that file. No other process can open up the same file for write access. The lock will automatically be released when the process finishes, no matter how it ends (clean exit, CTRL-C, Exception failure, etc)

A batch file can attempt to redirect 9 to a lock file, and if it fails, loop back until success. The symstore command is only run while the lock is in place. A non-standard file handle (stream?) is used so that the lock does not interfere with stdin, stdout, or stderr processing.

So you just need to make sure you never call symstore directly. Instead you always call it via a batch script. Something like the following (serializeSymstore.bat):

@echo off
setlocal

:loop

:: Save stderr definition and redirect stderr to nul
:: to hide possible redirection error when establishing lock.
8>&2 2>nul (

  %= Attempt to establish the lock and restore stderr =%
  9>"\\centralServer\somePath\symstore.lock" 2>&8 (

    %= If got here then lock is established throughout all commands =%
    %= in this set of parentheses.                                  =%

    %= Execute your command =%
    symstore %*

    %= Save the return code =%
    call set "rtnCd=%%errorlevel%%"

    %= The next command is a very fast way to clear the ERRORLEVEL. =%
    %= We don't want symstore failure to trigger a loop.            =%
    (call )
  )

) || (
  %= If entered here then failed to establish lock.                 =%
  %= Wait 1 second and then loop back to retry.                     =%
  %= Replace with PING delay if TIMEOUT not universally available.  =%
  timeout 1 /nobreak >nul
  goto loop
)

:: Exit with appropriate return code
exit /b %rtnCd%

Without comments, it becomes a tiny bit of code

@echo off
setlocal

:loop
8>&2 2>nul (
  9>"\\centralServer\somePath\symstore.lock" 2>&8 (
    symstore %*
    call set "rtnCd=%%errorlevel%%"
    (call )
  )
) || (
  timeout 1 /nobreak >nul
  goto loop
)
exit /b %rtnCd%

I have found this primitive and simple strategy to be extremely effective in many projects. I must confess that I have not tested the lock and release characteristics on remote machines. But I believe it should be reliable as long as all machines are Windows.

The only drawback I am aware of is that there is no FIFO queue. If multiple overlapping requests are received, then it's a random luck of the draw as to which process gets to go next. But the processes will be serialized.

EDIT:
I've read splattered bits' original answer prior to editing. He questions whether file locking is reliable on remote machines. I did some quick Google searches and there does appear to be some issues with file locking on UNC paths. If you run into problems, you may have better luck redirecting to a file on a mapped drive letter instead of directly through a UNC path. This is all theory - I've done no testing. Please be sure to do adequate testing before committing to this solution. Note that PUSHD is a convenient way to temporarily assign a drive letter to a UNC path without knowing what drive letters are available. POPD will unmap the drive assignment.

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This was exactly the paradigm I was hoping was possible...a batch/powershell wrapper that provides mutual-exclusivity. Preliminary testing on some VMs look good. I'll do more testing then accept! – Eric Webb Aug 2 '13 at 3:27
    
@EricWebb - Please look at the edit to my answer - there may be a problem with locks over UNC paths. – dbenham Aug 2 '13 at 4:20
    
It doesn't matter what the path is, UNC or a network drive, it matters that its a networked file system. Windows can't guarantee file locking when accessing the file over a network connection. – Aaron Jensen Aug 2 '13 at 4:46
    
@splatteredbits - Does it matter what OS or file system is being used on the target machine? Have you any references I can look at? I'd like to learn more. I've got to believe there are some configurations that can support this, but I can see how others might not. In my casual search I found claims that mapped drives solved some issues with locks against UNC paths. – dbenham Aug 2 '13 at 5:35
    
I have no reference other than my memory of reading about it before in regards to hosting Mercurial repositories on server shares. The Mercurial team doesn't recommend it because Windows can't guarantee locks on networked file systems. – Aaron Jensen Aug 2 '13 at 14:13

In order to lock access to the network drive, you'll need a third-party that both your CI services talk to. This third-party would then handle access to the network drive. This third party could be:

  • MSMQ
  • Row in a database table
  • WCF service on symbol server which runs symstore and your CCNet builds talk to it to trigger symstore
  • CCNet on the symbol server with a project/job that can be triggered remotely
  • A scheduled job on the symbol server that can be triggered remotely from your CI servers
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1  
it does not solve the problem if the two processes run in different hosts. – PA. Aug 1 '13 at 19:51
    
@PA The original question didn't mention anything about cross-machine requirements. – Aaron Jensen Aug 1 '13 at 20:13
    
you are right, it does not, I just was assuming it from previous similar scenarios (btw I didn't downvote your answer) – PA. Aug 1 '13 at 20:15
    
@splatteredbits this looks like a fine solution! After getting the initial answers (and your clarification request) I realized I needed to clarify my requirement as it changes the solutions substantially. But, if my requirement was block concurrency on one machine, I think this is right. – Eric Webb Aug 1 '13 at 21:32
    
@EricWebb I've updated my answer, since using a mutex won't work across computers. – Aaron Jensen Aug 1 '13 at 22:06

Use a file in the shared directory as semaphore to avoid concurrent executions.

:checkfile
if exist %cidir%\sem.txt goto :wait10secs
echo gotit! >%cidir%\sem.txt
doit
del %cidir%\sem.txt
goto :eof
:wait10secs
ing 192.0.2.2 -n 1 -w 10000 > nul
goto :checkfile

Be prepared for debugging all strange ways your batch can fail and all nasty racing conditions.

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1  
This looks like a race condition to me. Checking for the existence of sem.txt and creating (locking) it needs to be atomic for this to work, that, or creating the sem.txt fails if it already exists. – Eric Webb Aug 1 '13 at 19:51
    
yes it is, I left this detail implementation to the OP, or to a second SO question. – PA. Aug 1 '13 at 19:52
1  
That detail is fundamental to the question as stated! That said, the point about cross machine concurrency is a good one. – Eric Webb Aug 1 '13 at 19:55
    
you are right, but we don't have enough information for how fundamental is to avoid the concurrency. It could be that symstore would just refuse or ignore the second attempt. Or it could be some more serious situation. It is up to the OP to evaluate and come back to us if he needs help – PA. Aug 1 '13 at 20:08
    
The race condition is avoided by relying on a lock on the file instead of the existence of the file. See my answer – dbenham Aug 1 '13 at 22:24

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